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Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) or search for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 87 results in 47 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 119 (search)
e enemy's skirmish pits, capturing 15 prisoners with their arms. Early on the 18th again advanced the line, charged their pits, capturing 4 prisoners and driving the enemy in our front to their main works near foot of Kenesaw Mountain, and holding the position 600 yards therefrom under a heavy artillery and musketry fire. During these advances the regiment lost 2 killed and 5 wounded. The enemy again forced from his lines, the regiment with brigade went into position near southwest end of Kenesaw; again moving on night of 22d about one and a half miles to right and taking position on Bald Knob, 700 yards from enemy's main works, and from which the most vigorous shelling was kept up daily on our lines, the regiment losing 1 killed and 3 wounded. Remained in this position until the night of July 2, when the brigade moved to the left flank, only to find the enemy in retreat on the morning of July 3. Followed in pursuit at once, passing through Marietta and forcing the enemy, July 5, t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
. June 17, 18, the regiment occupying the same position, and constant skirmishing in front. June 19, early this morning the command moved forward to the foot of Kenesaw under a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries on the crest of the mountain, no casualties occurring in the regiment. June 20, steady skirmishing in front; at noon the rebel batteries on Kenesaw again opened on our camp, shelling us heavily, but resulting in no damage to the regiment other than tearing of tents, &c. June 21, heavy fighting on the right; the enemy have not used their guns on us, but the skirmishers keep up a continual fire; Private Kennedy, Company E, wounded. June 22, earl skirmishing on the line, with occasional artillery duels; Samuel Boice, Company K, wounded June 25, 1864. June 26, at 10 p. m. the command moved from in front of Kenesaw toward the right; were on the road all night, marching four miles; halted in rear of the Fourth Corps, and remained all day. June 27, at 6 a. m. the command, in l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 133 (search)
rtance transpired until the 19th. June 19, my regiment advanced as skirmishers; met the enemy in heavy force on Kenesaw Mountain; we lost I killed and 7 wounded, including I commissioned officer wounded. June 20, while encamped near the foot of Kenesaw, lost 5 enlisted men, wounded in camp. June 23, lost 2 enlisted men, wounded in camp. June 24, 1 enlisted man killed while on picket. June 26, moved from Kenesaw, and took position to the left. June 28, 2 enlisted men mortally wounded by sheKenesaw, and took position to the left. June 28, 2 enlisted men mortally wounded by shell in camp. July 3, the enemy having evacuated during the night, we pursued them at daybreak of the 3d, overtaking them at night-fall strongly intrenched. July 4, my regiment on the skirmish line; received order to advance the line, and, if possible, carry the enemy's riflepits; assaulted them, and advanced to within 100 yards of their pits, and finding it impossible to carry their works, we held our position under a galling fire, with a loss of 6 enlisted men killed and 21 wounded. July 5, t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
ece of woods in rear of front line, near Big Shanty Station. Lay here until the 18th. June 18, at 4 p. m. moved a half mile to the front toward Kenesaw Mountain and threw up earth-works. June 19, left our works at 7.50 a. m. and marched toward Kenesaw; halted at 9.30 a. m. and formed line of battle in front of rebel earth-works, where we remained until 11 a. m., when we moved on in a heavy rain-storm and formed in close column by division on a ridge three-quarters of a mile from Kenesaw. JusKenesaw. Just before night we moved slowly forward and formed in line of battle about forty rods from the foot of the mountain, and then at dark went on picket on the side of the mountain. The picket-firing here was very brisk and fatal, as the enemy were so much elevated above us. Distance marched, four miles. June 20, relieved from picket at dusk and camped at the foot of the mountain with the brigade. Here we remained until June 26. June 23, the enemy shelled our camp vigorously, wounding a very few o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 139 (search)
mpaign, the whole line being gradually shifted toward the railroad. In the afternoon of June 15 a portion of my regiment, then on the picketline, was sent forward as skirmishers at the time the whole line was advanced, the remainder of the regiment being held in reserve. The outposts of — the enemy were driven about three-quarters of a mile in our front, the pickets established on the new line, those of my regiment relieved, and the whole returned to camp. The enemy having fallen back to Kenesaw on the 18th, the whole line was advanced, my regiment taking a position in range of a battery on the mountain; we threw up temporary fortifications in the afternoon of the 19th, as it was apparent that the enemy were preparing to shell our camp. The next day they opened on us, shelling our camp furiously nearly all the forenoon, but without damage to my command. Moved with the brigade to a position about three miles southwest of the camp mentioned above. June 27, four companies (A, F, I
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 140 (search)
found the enemy had taken to his main works on Kenesaw Mountain and around Marietta. Our line was formed at the base of the mountain, where we remained until the night of the 25th, subjected to a continuous shelling from the rebel batteries on Kenesaw, which was alike annoying by day and unseasonable by night. After a night's march the morning of the 26th found us in rear of the Fourth Corps, facing to the east. On the 27th the regiment participated in that evermemorable assault upon the enemy's works around Kenesaw. By reference to list of killed and wounded you will see that it sustained a heavy loss. Of the commissioned officers, First Lieut. George A. Brown, Company A, was mortally wounded, and died three days after. Capt. William B. Akins, Company K, slight wound in the head by piece of shell, and Capt. Thomas L. Howden, Company G, slight in head and back by shell. Though the enemy's works were not carried, yet the line in which the Seventy-eighth advanced held its groun
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 143 (search)
side ditches of the enemy's works on the 27th of June were captured and 1 is missing. Among the dead we mourn the gallant Maj. John Yager. Absent on duty in Ohio when the cam. paign commenced, he asked to be relieved and hastened to join his regiment. His high sense of honor would not permit him to be absent from nis command in the hour of peril and aanger. He joined us at Dallas on the 30th of May, and in less than a month, on the 27th of June, at the assault upon the enemy's works at Kenesaw, at his post on the left of the regiment, cheering on the men, he received three mortal wounds, from which he died before he could be taken from the field. He was a brave man, a true soldier, and loved by the entire command. At the same time and from the same volley the accomplished scholar and soldier, Capt. M. B. Clason, received two mortal wounds, from which he died upon the field, while gallantly leading his company in the charge; also, the young, brave, and dashing Captain Patrick, o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 148 (search)
e close of this campaign. In conclusion I would say in behalf of the officers and enlisted men of this regiment, that they, with few exceptions, most manfully and soldierly, in every engagement in which the regiment has participated, stood up and faced the foe, while many fell dead on the field. It would be difficult to make special mention of names and do ample justice to all and i justice to none. A grateful country will reward them all for their noble services. The survivors of Kenesaw and subsequent battles can never forget our patriotic dead. Colonel Harmon, Captains Fellows and Lee, and Lieutenant McLean fell at the former place, where duty called them. At Peach Tree Creek, Lieutenant Jones, of Company D, commanding Company B, died as he had lived — a true Christian soldier. Lieutenant White, who so nobly fell at the crossing of the Sandtown road, was loved and respected by all whose good fortune it was to have his acquaintance. Again, at Jonesborough, the daring a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 150 (search)
Eighty-sixth Illinois on the 16th, and advanced the skirmish line on the 18th. On the 21st the regiment threw up works under the mountain. On the 2.d the regiment was ordered to support the skirmish line in a contemplated advance to the top of Kenesaw. The advance was not made, and the regiment returned on the 24th. Companies D, I, and C on the skirmish line at the foot of the mountain. Relieved at dusk by the Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, when the regiment marched two miles to the ricompanying list I hope will be sufficiently explicit. Of the officers whom we shall see no more, I can only say they flinched from no known duty, dying like they were, true men and true soldiers. Capt. S. M. Neighbor was mortally wounded at Kenesaw; also Lieuts. Ira H. Pool and D. F. Miser. Capt. P. C. Schneider and Lieut. J. H. Donaldson were killed on the field at Peach Tree. Were I to begin making special mention of the worthy it would be difficult to avoid injustice to some. Alike to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 159 (search)
ut my regiment lost only 11 men in killed and wounded; but so effectual was the assault of our army that during the night the enemy abandoned his works and moved nearer the mountain. Our lines followed, and from this time till the evacuation of Kenesaw, though constantly involved in heavy skirmishing, there is no need to detail the monotonous operations of my regiment. On the 3d of July the enemy evacuated Kenesaw and fell back to the Chattahoochee, to which place our army immediately follKenesaw and fell back to the Chattahoochee, to which place our army immediately followed. Heavy skirmishing, but no regular combat, took place; one corps after another crossed the river, my regiment crossing with its brigade on the 17th of July. We skirmished slowly and steadily toward Atlanta, being always under fire, but not involved (except slightly on the 20th) in any of the heavy engagements around the city. The most notable of our combats occurred on the 5th of August, when we were ordered to support the skirmish line while we threw forward our intrenchments nearer th
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