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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 17 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) or search for Kenesaw (Nebraska, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 87 results in 47 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
mishers engaged the enemy; fell slowly back to the foot of Kenesaw Mountain; the casualties in the regiment were 1 commissioned officer wounded, 2 enlisted men killed, and 7 enlisted men wounded. On Monday, June 20, the regiment lay in front of Kenesaw all day; no casualties. On Tuesday, June 21, the regiment moved forward and to the right. We were here opened upon by two batteries from the rebels. We threw up a new line of works, it being already the third before Kenesaw in about twenty-foKenesaw in about twenty-four hours; the casualties from the enemy's shells were 1 enlisted man killed and 2 enlisted men wounded. On Wednesday, June 22, the enemy opened upon us the same as before, but our works being completed we were better protected, and no casualties occurred in the regiment. On Thursday, June 23, the regiment moved to the right and lay in reserve until dark, when we moved forward close to the enemy, and during the night completed a strong earth-work. On Friday, June 24, we had some skirmishing;
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
n. The fire of the latter would have been very destructive to our troops. Our loss this day was very large. The enemy retired in the night to their position at Kenesaw. June 19, advanced, General Stanley's division leading; my skirmish line, under Colonel Miller, Thirtysixth Illinois, was thrown out well to the left, to cover ttions took place beyond changing and adjusting the lines, and skirmishes and demonstrations. June 27, my division was ordered to assault the enemy's lines before Kenesaw, in front of the position held by General Stanley's division. The formation prescribed by General Howard was in two columns, composed of divisions closed in massivision; Capt. J. S. Bliss, aide-de-camp, Sixty-seventh New York Volunteers, wounded; Lieut. H. W. Jackson, aide-de-camp, Fourth New Jersey Volunteers, wounded at Kenesaw, June 27; Lieut. E. Carrington, aide-de-camp; Captain Ransom, provost-marshal, Forty-fourth Illinois; Captain Morgan, acting assistant inspector-general, Seventy-
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
ed all their duties, and there is no command in the U. S. Army composed of better men than those who make up the First Brigade, of the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. Many of the bravest and best have fallen a sacrifice to their country's cause. It is impossible for me in this report to mention all the deserving by name, but the memory of such men as Col. Silas Miller, of the Thirty-sixth Illinois, who was mortally wounded while in charge of my skirmish line on the 27th of June, at Kenesaw, and of Lieutenant-Colonel Chandler, of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, who was killed while leading his regiment in the charge of that day, and of Lieutenant-Colonel Kerr, Seventy-fourth Illinois Infantry, who was mortally wounded and captured on the parapets of the enemy's works in the same action, will never fade in the hearts of a people who appreciate the noble and the brave and the good. Col. W. W. Barrett, of the Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry, is entitled to special mention for his
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
Kingston. Moved toward Dallas May 23; arrived near New Hope Church May 26. At this place we were under fire for eleven days, during which time the regiment was engaged in skirmishing, erecting works, and performing other duties incident to a position so close to the enemy. The patient endurance and determined bravery of both officers and men during this time are worthy of highest praise. June 7, we marched to a point near Acworth, from which place, on the 10th, the regiment moved toward Kenesaw. On the 19th of June Colonel Miller was ordered by the brigade commander to advance the Thirty-sixth Illinois as skirmishers. The regiment was deployed and moved into a thicket so dense that but a few feet could be seen in advance; got very near the enemy before seeing them. The enemy were thrown into confusion, and it being utterly impossible to maintain a very regular line on our own part while advancing through such a place, we soon became mingled with the enemy. While in this condi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 40 (search)
dark, when they retreated; we lost 4 killed and 32 wounded. We took part in the operations near Dallas, in which we lost 2 killed and 5 wounded. May 31, our adjutant was mortally wounded and 1 captain severely. In the skirmishing from Dallas to Kenesaw we had 10 men killed and wounded. In the charge on Kenesaw, June 27, we lost: Commissioned officers, 3 wounded; enlisted men, 5 killed and 28 wounded. In the siege of Atlanta the regiment lost, in killed and wounded, 13. August 26, marched towKenesaw, June 27, we lost: Commissioned officers, 3 wounded; enlisted men, 5 killed and 28 wounded. In the siege of Atlanta the regiment lost, in killed and wounded, 13. August 26, marched toward the right flank of our army and southwest of Atlanta. August 30, was on the skirmish line; came up with the enemy's skirmishers, charged them and drove them back. September 1, we took part with the brigade, by your order, in burning the Macon railroad. At 4 p. m. was in position in front of the enemy near Jonesborough; at 5 o'clock we advanced on the enemy and was ordered by you to charge with my regiment across a field and make a lodgment in the timber on the opposite side, which order
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 41 (search)
ntry. Hdqrs. Seventy-Third Illinois Infantry Vols., Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the recent campaign: The Seventy-third Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers marched from Cleveland, Tenn., May 3, 1864, numbering about 250 guns; was engaged in action at Resaca, Ga., May 14 and 15; at Adairsville May 17; in various skirmishes from Dallas to Kenesaw Mountain; in the action of June 27 at Kenesaw; that of July 20 at Peach Tree Creek; in the operations before Atlanta from July 22 to August 26, and in the engagement at Jonesborough, Ga., on September 1. The casualties in the command have been 2 commissioned officers wounded, 16 enlisted men killed or died of wounds, and 37 wounded, making a total of 55. To my officers and men I return my hearty thanks for their prompt obedience to my orders and ready performance of duty at all times. I am, colonel, very respectfully, your
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
ince died), 7; wounded, 27; missing, 7. Aggregate loss, 63. Colonel Kerr, foremost in the regiment, was captured mortally wounded. The undersigned, being senior officer, assumed command of the regiment and brought it off the field. June 28, 1 man was wounded this day. Lay in these works until July 2, when, at 9 p. m., moved to left one mile, and at 12 m. relieved Third Division in works. July 3, at 3 a. m. this morning it was discovered that the rebels had evacuated all the works around Kenesaw and the mountain itself. Troops were immediately sent in pursuit. The regiment moved out at 7 a. m., and at 11 a. m. stacked arms in Marietta. Moved on, and at 7.30 p. m. camped at Smyrna Camp-Ground, the regiment going on picket. July 4, the regiment was on the skirmish line all day, advancing one and a half miles, driving the enemy from their rifle-pits under a heavy fire. Loss this day, 7 men wounded, 2 of them mortally. July 5, moved out at 7 a. m., advancing slowly. Constant ski
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
ain Berkshire, Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers, were both killed while gallantly leading their companies in the charge. Nothing of importance occurred in my command until the night of the 2d of July, when the enemy evacuated their strong hold at Kenesaw, and retreated toward the Chattahoochee River. On the morning of the 3d I was ordered to march to Marietta, and from thence in pursuit of the enemy, whom we found strongly intrenched some five miles distant, in a southerly direction. The 4tion was particularly worthy of commendation; also, to Lieutenant-Colonel Blanch, Fifty-seventh Indiana Volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Hammond, One hundredth Illinois Volunteers: Lieutenant-Colonel Boone, Twentyeighth Kentucky, who was wounded at Kenesaw, but refused to leave the field; Major Barth, Twenty-eighth Kentucky Volunteers, who has commanded the regiment since Lieutenant-Colonel Boone was wounded; Lieutenant-Colonel Squires, Twenty-sixth Ohio; Major Peatman, Twenty-sixth Ohio, who has
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 52 (search)
19th, when we halted, and the whole army rested for three days near Kingston. Resumed the march on the 23d, and found the enemy on the 25th near Dallas. After eleven days skirmishing they retreated, and we rested three days near Acworth. The casualties here (near Dallas) were 1 officer and 11 men wounded. Moved forward on the 9th of June, and on the 15th, being on the skirmish line, lost 1 officer and 12 men killed and wounded. On the 17th the enemy decamped to their intrenchments at Kenesaw, where nothing except changes of line and light skirmishing occurred till the 27th, when we participated in an assault on the enemy's line, losing 4 officers and 39 men. The losses from the 15th to this time were 11 men killed and wounded. The enemy left this line on the night of the 2d of July, and we marched to the Chattahoochee without further hinderance than a show of resistance on the 4th. On the 10th marched to Roswell, eighteen miles up the river, and crossed, returning to our posi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
ance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works. June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. June 18, the lines are extended, the One hundred and twenty-fifth moves a short distance to the right and fortifies. June 19, the enemy having evacuated during last night, our lines are advanced two miles, when we again encountered him at the base of Kenesaw, on the northeast side of the mountain. Heavy cannonading is opened. Lieut. Freeman Collins is killed by a fragment of shell, 2 men are wounded. Threw up strong works at night. June 20, the brigade being relieved by a brigade of the Fourteenth Army Corps, at dark the regiment marched one mile to the rear and bivouacked in open field. June 21, moved half a mile to the right, relieving Twentieth Army Corps in the trenches. At 4 p. m. advanced our lines 400 yards and fortified. June 22,
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