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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Appleton, Nathan and Samuel, (search)
Appleton, Nathan and Samuel, Merchants and philanthropists; brothers; born in New Ipswich, N. H., in 1779 and 1766 respectively; engaged in the cotton manufacturing business, as partners; were founders of the city of Lowell, Mass., which grew up around their many mills. Both were widely known for their benevolence. Nathan set up the first power loom in the United States, in his Waltham mill. Nathan died in 1861; Samuel, in 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Farrar, Timothy 1788-1874 (search)
Farrar, Timothy 1788-1874 Jurist; born in New Ipswich, N. H., March 17, 1788; was associated in law practice with Daniel Webster in 1813-16; vice-president of the New England Historico-Genealogical Society in 1853-58. His publications include Report of the Dartmouth College case; Review of the Dred Scott decision; and Manual of the Constitution of the United States. He died in 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kidder, Frederick 1804-1885 (search)
Kidder, Frederick 1804-1885 Author; born in New Ipswich, N. H., April 16, 1804; engaged in business at different times in Boston, New York, and the South; and became widely known as an antiquarian authority. His publications include The history of New Ipswich, N. H., from its first Grant in 1736 to 1852 (with Augustus A. Gould); The expeditions of Capt. John Lovewell; Military operations in Eastern Maine and Nova Scotia during the Revolution; History of the first New Hampshire Regiment in thmes in Boston, New York, and the South; and became widely known as an antiquarian authority. His publications include The history of New Ipswich, N. H., from its first Grant in 1736 to 1852 (with Augustus A. Gould); The expeditions of Capt. John Lovewell; Military operations in Eastern Maine and Nova Scotia during the Revolution; History of the first New Hampshire Regiment in the War of the Revolution; and History of the Boston massacre, March 5, 1770. He died in Melrose, Mass., Dec. 19, 1885.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
d not seen for a long time, and the pleasure at meeting was mutual. There is to be a Free Soil Convention in this town next week; and to-morrow Mr. Child begins a short tour through the county, for the purpose of addressing the people, and urging upon them the importance of sending delegates to the meeting. Bro. George drove down to the depot a G. W. Benson. few minutes after my arrival, and carried me and my baggage, with Mr. Child and Mrs. Hammond Eliza P. Hammond, formerly of New Ipswich, N. H., where her husband, an amateur portrait painter, had had Mr. Garrison for a sitter in January, 1844. (whom we took up by the way), to Bensonville. On the way, we discussed the affairs of the nation as vigorously and actively as possible. Speaking of Mrs. Chapman's visit to Europe, for educational purposes in regard to her children, Mr. Child expressed much surprise and wonder at her choice, and said that he had supposed there was not steam power enough to drag her away from the anti-
n. 1724-5 Ebenezer, b. 27 Ap. 1729 (Town Rec. 1730, but bap. 4 May 1729); Nathan, b. 27 Sept. 1733; John, b. 25 Sept. 1735; Silence, b. 22 Mar. 1739-40, d. 29 Nov. 1747; Ebenezer, bap. 29 Ap. 1714; grad. H. C. 1762, was the first lawyer in New Ipswich, N. H., Judge of Probate sixteen years, and d. 10 Sept. 1810. Solomon the f. was living in 1764; his w. Abigail d. 18 Jan. 1785. 12. Noah, s. of Daniel (7), m. Martha Hubbard 26 Oct. 1725, and had John, b. 12 Oct. 1729; Noah, 14 Jan. 1731-2; Nis w. Sarah d. 11 Sept. 1711. 2. Thomas, s. of Thomas (1), m. Elizabeth Chadwick, and had in Wat., John, b. 8 July 1694; Elizabeth, b. 17 Aug. 1698; and in Camb., Jonas, b. 1 Oct. 1711, said to have been one of the first five settlers of New Ipswich, N. H. Worwood, Richard, d. 13 May 1644. Wyer, Edward, Jr., m. Abigail Lawrence 1 Sept. 1684. Wyeth, Nicholas, about 1645 bought house and land on the westerly side of Garden Street, near Phillips Place, which remained in possession of his
appointed administratrix 20 Ap. 1747. 11. Solomon, s. of Daniel (7), m. Elizabeth Chamberlin 8 May 1723, who d. suddenly 21 Feb. 1736-7, and he m. Abigail, wid. of Geo. Macsparran, 1738; his chil. were Elizabeth, b. 4 Nov. 1723; Solomon, b. 7 Jan. 1724-5 Ebenezer, b. 27 Ap. 1729 (Town Rec. 1730, but bap. 4 May 1729); Nathan, b. 27 Sept. 1733; John, b. 25 Sept. 1735; Silence, b. 22 Mar. 1739-40, d. 29 Nov. 1747; Ebenezer, bap. 29 Ap. 1714; grad. H. C. 1762, was the first lawyer in New Ipswich, N. H., Judge of Probate sixteen years, and d. 10 Sept. 1810. Solomon the f. was living in 1764; his w. Abigail d. 18 Jan. 1785. 12. Noah, s. of Daniel (7), m. Martha Hubbard 26 Oct. 1725, and had John, b. 12 Oct. 1729; Noah, 14 Jan. 1731-2; Noah, bap. 23 Dec. 1733. All these appear to have d. young. Noah the f. died 1749. His w. Martha long survived him, and was a distinguished school-dame. In 1758 she purchased the homestead of Dr. Coolidge, at the E. corner of Harvard and Holyoke S
; Elizabeth, b. 30 Ap. 1668, m. John How at Sudbury 3 Nov. 1686; Mary, b. 28 Nov. 1673, m. Samuel Jones 1700; Joseph, b. 16 Nov. 1677. Thomas the f. res. on the south side of the river until about 1666, when he rem. to Sudbury, and d. about 1713; his w. Sarah d. 11 Sept. 1711. 2. Thomas, s. of Thomas (1), m. Elizabeth Chadwick, and had in Wat., John, b. 8 July 1694; Elizabeth, b. 17 Aug. 1698; and in Camb., Jonas, b. 1 Oct. 1711, said to have been one of the first five settlers of New Ipswich, N. H. Worwood, Richard, d. 13 May 1644. Wyer, Edward, Jr., m. Abigail Lawrence 1 Sept. 1684. Wyeth, Nicholas, about 1645 bought house and land on the westerly side of Garden Street, near Phillips Place, which remained in possession of his descendants, bearing the name of Wyeth, for more than two centuries. He had then a dau. Sarah, by a former wife, b. in England, who m. John Fiske of Wat. 11 Dec. 1651; there is no evidence that he brought other children with him. He m. Rebecca, wid.
27. Mt. Holly, Vt., 55, 56. Munroe, —, 48. Munroe, Edwin, 17, 21. Munroe, Henry, 56. Myles, Rev., John, 53. Myles Standish and the Plymouth Explorers, 61. Mystic, No. 6, 14. Mystic Pumping Station, 60. Mystic River, 51, 71. Mystic Valley Parkway, 50. Nahant, Mass., 13. Napoleon, 69, 77. Nathan Tufts Park, 51. National Geographic Society, 62. Naval School Hospital, 40. New Bridge, 9. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 62. New England Primer, 78. New Ipswich, N. H., 48. New Orleans, La., 62, 64, 65, 66, 67, 80, 81, 82. Newton Centre, Mass., 58. Newton, Joanna, 45. Newton, Mass., 22. Nineteenth Army Corps, 65. Nineteenth Army Corps, History of the, 64. Ninetieth Pennsylvania, 32. Noble, Mary Ann, 10. North Star, Transport, 65. North Street, 45. Norton North Precinct, 53. Norton, Mass., 53. Norwich, Conn., 22. Nutting, John, 53. Oasis Lodge, I. O. O. F., 23. Oglethorpe Guard House, 38. Oliver, F. J., 32. Oliver, Juds
p, bap. here 26 Aug. 1753; Mary (perhaps of same), bap. here 7 Oct. 1753. Isaac, had child, b.——— 1779 (see Locke Book, 125?). Isaac, belonged to the Baptist Society in Camb. N. W. Pct. 21 July, 1787. [Deacon of Baptist ch. at Menotomy—per Locke Book, 67.] See Wyman, 682; Locke Book. Isaac, d. 12 Apr. 1806, a. 45—son of foregoing Isaac-see Locke Book, 125. Isaac Munroe, s. of Isaac and Abigail, and gr.—s. of Dea. Isaac, of Menotomy, was born 26 April, 178; married Emily Wheeler, of New Ipswich, N. H., 28 October, 1807. He was a printer, and was of the firm of Munroe & French, publishers of the Boston Patriot, established 1809. In 1812 he removed to Baltimore, Md., and was associated in publishing the Baltimore Patriot, which supported Mr. Madison's administration and the war of 1812, and was an influential journal for half a century. He was a volunteer in the Artillery Company of Fencibles, commanded by Chief-Justice Nicholson, at the time of the attack on Baltimore by the
A Medford teacher. Ellen M. Barr. About half-way between Mt. Monadnock, N. H., and Mt. Wachusett, Mass., lies the little village of New Ipswich, N. H., where may be found a large old-fashioned mansion dating back to 1768, and belonging to the Barrs. On one side stands a large willow tree with the most comfortable rustic seats built among its trunk-like branches. In this colonial house, with its large fireplaces and cozy-corners, was born, in 1840, a little girl destined to become one of Medford's most beloved and influential teachers. The New England Magazine states that James Barr, a Scotch gentleman traveling in the American colonies, was caught here when war was declared against Great Britain, and falling in love with a bright-eyed New Hampshire maiden, never went back to his Highland home. His son, Dr. James Barr, prominent as a physician in New Ipswich, endeared himself for miles around for his sturdy character and genial wit. He married Laura L. Bellows of Wa
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