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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Fort Sumner (New Mexico, United States) or search for Fort Sumner (New Mexico, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
we must say a few words regarding the isolated exploits which marked the first ten weeks of the year in the vast regions situated between the Mississippi, the Missouri, and the Rocky Mountains. In New Mexico, finally abandoned by the Southerners, the Federals had, as before the war, no other adversaries than the Indian tribes that did not yet recognize their authority. Other Indians who had submitted claimed their protection. Among these were the Apaches, who had been gathered around Fort Sumner. These were attacked on the 4th of January by the Navajoes. The little garrison hastened to their assistance, and easily mastered the savages, who were armed with only bows and arrows. The latter lost about sixty warriors. Two days after, Colonel Kit Carson, well known for his experience in Indian wars, left Fort Canby with four hundred men to punish these savages. He penetrated into the deep valleys or cañons which were their abode, and where careful farming—a rare thing among India