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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), The dove of the regiment: an incident of the battle of Ohickamauga. (search)
d, the rebels on their track, A weary host, our scattered bands come marching slowly back. “Now fire the dwellings, fell the groves, these sylvan bowers lay low, That o'er the plain our guns may speak a welcome to the foe! Though driven from the bloody field we almost won, and lost, Back from this mountain citadel we'll hurl the rebel host; As, after Cannee's fatal day, the Roman armies bore Their standards from Tiber's banks to Afric's hated shore; As when the northern bear waned weak, in Borodino's fight, Napoleon's host recoiled before the vengeful Muscovite ; So yet from Chattanooga's walls we'll spring, the foe to meet-- The army of the Cumberland shall never know defeat!” As from doomed Sodom's sin-cursed town to Zoar Lot trembling crossed, So from the tumult flees a dove, and cowers amid our host; A message to that war-worn band it bears upon its wing, Though not the olive-leaf of Peace, Hope's grateful offering. “Be firm,” its language seems to be, “though right may yield
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Antietam scenes. (search)
rted action, no hammering all along the line at the same time. Heavy blows were given, but they were not followed up. It has been said that McClellan's excuse for not throwing in Porter's corps at that moment was the reason given by Napoleon at Borodino when asked why he did not at a certain moment put in the Imperial Guard: If I am defeated to-day, where is my army for to-morrow? There was no parallel between Antietam and Borodino. The moment had come for dividing Lee's army at its center anBorodino. The moment had come for dividing Lee's army at its center and crushing it back upon the Potomac in utter rout. A. P. Hill, on his way from Harper's Ferry to join Lee, was at that moment fording the Potomac at Shepherdstown. This General McClellan did not know, but the fact was before him that French and Richardson had pierced the Confederate center. With the falling back of the Confederates I went up past Roulette's house to the sunken road. The hillside was dotted with prostrate forms of men in blue, but in the sunken road, what a ghastly spectacl
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
n the whole course of an enterprise. Such was the famous project of marching upon Leipzig, without being disquieted about Dresden and the two hundred and fifty thousand men of Napoleon, a project which, resolved upon at Trachenberg in the month of August, 1813, would probably have been fatal to the allied armies, if my soliditations made at Jungferteinitz, had not caused it to be modified. The second case is when we should have a remote or deep line of operations, like that of Napoleon at Borodino; especially if this line of operations offered still but a single suitable line of retreat; then every flank movement which should leave it exposed, would be a grave fault. In countries where good secondary communications should be numerous, flank movements would be less dangerous, because at need one could have recourse to a change of line of operations if he were repulsed. The physical and moral state of armies, the more or less energetic character of the chiefs and of the troops, cou
tself in the position R on the plan, and the French and English in A F. The Russians retreated in the best order, and unmolested by the enemy. We may well ask if 61,000 French and English could not have done better than to force 35,000 Russians to a well-ordered retreat. The dispositions of the Russian commander, Prince Menschikoff, were made in the expectation of a main attack on the road to Burluk; this road was well swept by a battery of four 32-pounders; and in case the regiment Borodino (15th) was driven back, the advancing columns of the enemy would have been assailed on all sides by such a fire that their retreat would have been very probable. His plan of battle was of an offensive defense, but becoming offensive only at the moment the enemy entered his own lines. His front was about 7000 yards long, and counted, therefore, five men for every yard of the front, which number was quite sufficient, considering the nature of the ground. His position is given in the small
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 5: casualties compared with those of European wars — loss in each arm of the service — deaths from disease — classification of deaths by causes. (search)
tally wounded, 85,482 wounded, and 14,138 missing; total, 127,897. All historians agree that Borodino was the bloodiest battle since the introduction of gunpowder. The casualties in that battle ha, and prisoners, and the French loss at considerably above 20,000. Allison gives the losses at Borodino in round numbers only, placing the French loss at 50,000, and the Russian at 45,000. The most London Statistical Society, which places the number of killed and wounded in the French army at Borodino at 28,085, out of 133,000 troops present on the field. The Russian army numbered 132,000 at thits loss was greater than that of its antagonist. Although the number of killed and wounded at Borodino was greater, numerically, than at Waterloo and Gettysburg, the percentage of loss was very muchy stated, that no definite idea of the loss can be obtained. It was greater, probably, than at Borodino. In the American Civil War, the Union Armies lost 110,070 killed or mortally wounded, and 27
the ponderous fore and after wheels of his gun-carriage, hanging on with both hands, and vainly striving to jump upon the ordnance. The drivers were spurring the horses; he could not cling much longer, and a more agonized expression never fixed the features of a drowning man. The carriage bounded from the roughness of a steep hill leading to a creek, he lost his hold, fell, and in an instant the great wheels had crushed the life out of him. Who ever saw such a flight? Could the retreat at Borodino have exceeded it in confusion and tumult? I think not. It did not slack in the least until Centreville was reached. There the sight of the reserve — Miles's brigade — formed in order on the hill, seemed somewhat to reassure the van. But still the teams and foot-soldiers pushed on, passing their own camps and heading swiftly for the distant Potomac, until for ten miles the road over which the grand army had so lately passed southward, gay with unstained banners, and flushed with surety of
000 Torgau, 1760Prussians, 46,00012,00024,0002226 Austrians, 60,00012,000 Austerlitz, 1805French, 65,0009,00025,0001613 Allies, 83,00016,000 Eylau, 1807French, 70,00020,00042,0003328 Russians, 63,50022,000 Heilsberg, 1807Russians, 84,00010,00022,0001311 French, 85,00012,000 Friedland, 1807French, 75,00010,00034,0002313 Russians, 67,00024,000 Aspern, 1809Austrians, 75,00020,00045,0002626 French, 95,00025,000 Wagram, 1809French, 220,00022,00044,000.1110 Austrians, 150,00022,000 Borodino, 1812French, 125,00030,00075,0002824 Russians, 138,00045,000 Bautzen, 1813French, 190,00012,00024,00086 Allies, 110,00012,000 Leipsic, 1813Allies, 290,00042,00092,0002014 French, 150,00050,000 Ligny, 1815French, 73,00012,00024,0001516 Prussians, 86,00012,000 Waterloo, 1815Allies, 100,00020,00042,0002420 French, 70,00022,000 Solferino, 1859Allies, 135,00016,50031,5001011 Austrians, 160,00015,000 Koniggratz, 1866Prussians, 211,0008,89426,89464 Austrians, 206,00018,000 Vionville,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
r who had met no equal; we were an army who saw in half the guns of our train the spoil of the enemy, who bore upon our flags the blazon of consistent victory. If he and we confided in our daring and trusted to downright fighting for what strategy might have safely won, who shall blame us and which shall blame the other? It was a fault, if fault there were, such as in a soldier leans to virtue's side; it was the fault of Marlbrook at Malplaquet, of Great Frederic at Torgau, of Napoleon at Borodino. It is the famous fault of the column of Fontenoy, and the generous haste that led Hampden to his death. Lee chose no defensive of his own will. None knew better than he that axiom of the military art which finds the logical end of defence in surrender. None knew better than he that Fabius had never earned his fame by the policy some attribute to him, nor saved his country by retreats, however regular, or the skill, however great, to choose positions only to abandon them. The defensi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 6 (search)
o have a fire ready for me in my room on my return from a journey. I think it was on that very evening that he read aloud to me from Krummacher's Parables, a book then much liked among us,--selecting that fine tale describing the gradual downfall of a youth of unbounded aspirations, which the author sums up with the terse conclusion, But the name of that youth is not mentioned among the poets of Greece. It was thus with Hurlbert when he died, although his few poems in Putnam's magazine --Borodino, Sorrento, and the like — seemed to us the dawn of a wholly new genius; and I remember that when the cool and keen-sighted Whittier read his Gan Eden, he said to me that one who had written that could write anything he pleased. Yet the name of the youth was not mentioned among the poets; and the utter indifference with which the announcement of his death was received was a tragic epitaph upon a wasted life. Thanks to a fortunate home training and the subsequent influence of Emerson and
ponderous fore and after wheels of his gun-carriage, hanging on with both hands and vainly striving to jump upon the ordnance. The drivers were spurring the horses; he could not cling much longer, and a more agonized expression never fixed the features of a drowning man. The carriage bounded from the roughness of a steep hill leading to a creek; he lost his hold, fell, and in an instant the great wheels had crushed the life out of him. Who ever saw such a fight? Could the retreat at Borodino have exceeded it in confusion and tumult? I think not. It did not slack in the least until Centreville was reached.--There the sight of the reserve — Miles' Brigade — formed in order on the hill, seemed somewhat to reassure the van. But still the teams and foot soldiers pushed on, passing their own camp and heading swiftly for the distant Potomac, until for ten miles the road over which the grand army had so lately passed southward, gay with unstained banners, and flushed with surety of st
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