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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cornelius Tacitus, A Dialogue on Oratory (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 40 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 28 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 20 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 10 0 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Glass, Washingtonii Vita (ed. J.N. Reynolds) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Art of Poetry: To the Pisos (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Cicero (New York, United States) or search for Cicero (New York, United States) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 4 (search)
t idlers pared their nails in the shops to Rome.; he collected all the parings, and carried them off. ANTHRAX I' faith, you do describe a miserably stingy wretch. LYCONIDES But do you think that he does live so very stingily and wretchedly? STROBILUS A kite, the other day, carried off his morsel of food; the fellow went crying to the PrætorTo the Prœtor: The "Prætor" was a magistrate at Rome, who administered justice, and ranked next to the Consuls. There were eight Prætors in the time of Cicero. Two of them were employed in adjudicating "in causis privatis," "disputes concerning private property." One of these was called "Prætor urbanus," or "the city Prætor," who administered justice when the parties were "cives," or possessed the rights of Roman citizenship. The other was called "Prætor peregrinus," or "the foreigners' Prætor," who administered justice when both the litigating parties, or only one of them, were "peregrini," or "foreigners," and had not the right of Roman citizen