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Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Cratylus, Theaetetus, Sophist, Statesman 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 239 (search)
s. Talthybius Why! is it not an honor that she should win our monarch's love? Hecuba What have you done to her whom recently you took from me, my child? Talthybius Do you mean Polyxena, or whom do you inquire about? Hecuba Yes, that one; to whom has the lot assigned her? Talthybius To minister at Achilles' tomb has been appointed her. Hecuba Woe is me! I the mother of a dead man's slave! What custom, what ordinance is this among Hellenes, friend? Talthybius Count your daughter happy; it is well with her. Hecuba What wild words are these? Please tell me, is she still alive? Talthybius Her fate is one that sets her free from trouble. Hecuba And what of the wife of Hector skilled in arms, sad Andromache? declare her fate. Talthybius She too was a chosen prize; Achilles' son took her. Hecuba As for me whose hair is white with age, who need to hold a staff to be to me a third foot, whose servant am I to be? Talthybius Odysseus, king of Ithaca, has taken you to be his slave.
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 634 (search)
as though she never had seen the light, and little she knows of her calamity; whereas I, who aimed at a fair repute, though I won a higher lot than most, yet missed my luck in life. For all that stamps the wife a woman chaste, I strove to do in Hector's home. In the first place, whether there is a slur upon a woman, or whether there is not, the very fact of her not staying at home brings in its train an evil name; therefore I gave up any longing to do so, and stayed within my house; nor wouldm, and where it was best to yield. Report of this has reached the Achaean army, and proved my ruin; for when I was taken captive, Achilles' son would have me as his wife, and I must serve in the house of murderers. And if I set aside my love for Hector, and open my heart to this new lord, I shall appear a traitress to the dead, while, if I hate him, I shall incur my master's displeasure. And yet they say a single night removes a woman's dislike for her husband; I despise the woman who, when sh
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 673 (search)
O my dear Hector, in you I found a husband amply dowered with wisdom, noble birth and fortune, a brave man and a mighty; while you took from my father's house a spotless bride, yourself the first to make this maiden wife. But now death has claimed you, and I am soon to sail to Hellas, a captive doomed to wear the yoke of slavery. Has not then the dead Polyxena, for whom you wail, less evil to bear than I? I have not so much as hope, the last resource of every human heart, nor do I beguile mysld to fortune and commit themselves to the driving billows. Even so I, by reason of my countless troubles, am speechless and forbear to say a word; for this surge of misery from the gods is too strong for me. Cease, my darling child, to speak of Hector's fate; no tears of yours can save him; honor your present master, offering your sweet nature as the bait to win him. If you do this, you will cheer your friends as well as yourself and you shalt rear my Hector's child to lend stout aid to Ilium
Plato, Cratylus, section 392e (search)
He alone defended their city and long walls.Hom. Il. 22.507But the verb is in the second person, addressed by Hecuba to Hector after his death. Therefore, as it seems, it is right to call the son of the defender Astyanax (Lord of the city), ruler of that which his father, as Homer says, defended.HermogenesThat is clear to me.SocratesIndeed? I do not yet understand about it myself, Hermogenes. Do you?HermogenesNo, by Zeus, I do not.
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 3 (search)
make the fruits grow and nourish them, and stir the winds and make them remit, and warm the bodies of men properly: go, travel round, and so administer things from the greatest to the least. You are a calf; when a lion shall appear, do your proper business (i. e. run away): if you do not, you will suffer. You are a bull: advance and fight, for this is your business, and becomes you, and you can do it. You can lead the army against Ilium; be Agamemnon. You can fight in single combat against Hector: be Achilles. But if ThersitesSee the description of Thersites in the Iliad, ii. 212. came forward and claimed the command, he would either not have obtained it; or if he did obtain it, he would have disgraced himself before many witnesses. Do you also think about the matter carefully: it is not what it seems to you. (You say) I wear a cloak now and I shall wear it then: I sleep hard now, and I shall sleep hard then: I will take in addition a little bag now and a staff, and I will go about a
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 3 (search)
orm the year and the seasons, and increase and nourish the fruits; you can raise and calm the winds, and give an equable warmth to the bodies of men. Go; make your circuit, and thus move everything from the greatest to the least. You are a calf; when the lion appears, act accordingly, or you will suffer for it. You are a bull; come and fight; for that is incumbent on you and becomes you, and you can do it. You can lead an army to Troy; be you Agamemnon. You can engage in single combat with Hector; be you Achilles." But if Thersites had come and claimed the command, either he would not have obtained it, or, if he had, he would have disgraced himself before so many more witnesses. Do you, too, carefully deliberate upon this undertaking; it is not what you think it. "I wear an old cloak now, and I shall have one then. I sleep upon the hard ground now, and I shall sleep so then. I will moreover take a wallet and a staff, and go about, and beg of those I meet, and begin by rebuking them;
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 11, line 749 (search)
ed from Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymede— taken by Jupiter, and old Laomedon, and Priam, ruler at the fall of Troy. “Aesacus was the brother of the great illustrious Hector; and, if he had not been victimized by a strange fate in youth, he would have equalled Hector's glorious fame, Hector was child of Hecuba, who was daughter of DymHector's glorious fame, Hector was child of Hecuba, who was daughter of Dymas. Alexirhoe, the daughter of the two-horned Granicus, so rumor has it, secretly brought forth Aesacus, hidden under Ida's shade. “He loathed the city and away from court, frequented lonely mountains and the fields of unambitious peasants. Rarely he was seen among the throngs of Ilium.— yet, neither churlish nor impregnable to loHector was child of Hecuba, who was daughter of Dymas. Alexirhoe, the daughter of the two-horned Granicus, so rumor has it, secretly brought forth Aesacus, hidden under Ida's shade. “He loathed the city and away from court, frequented lonely mountains and the fields of unambitious peasants. Rarely he was seen among the throngs of Ilium.— yet, neither churlish nor impregnable to love's appeal, he saw Hesperia, the daughter of Cebrenus, while she was once resting on the velvet-shaded banks of her sire's cherished stream. Aesacus had so often sought for her throughout the woods. “Just when he saw her, while she rested there, her hair spread on her shoulders to the sun, she saw him, and without delay sh
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy VI: On the Death of His Mistress's Parrot. By Creech. (search)
Plain fountain water all thy drink allow'd, And nut and poppy-seed were all thy food. The preying vultures and the kites remain, And the unlucky crow still caws for rain; The chough still lives 'midst fierce Minerva's hate, And scarce nine hundred years conclude her fate; But my poor Poll now hangs his sickly head, My Poll, my present from the east, is dead. Best things are sooner snatch'd by cov'tous fate, To worse she freely gives a longer date; Thersites brave Achilles' fate surviv'd, And Hector fell, whilst all his brothers liv'd. Why should I tell what vows Corinna made? How oft she begg'd thy life, how oft she pray'd ? The seventh day came, and now the Fates begin To end the thread, they had no more to spin; Yet still he talk'd, and when death nearer drew, His last breath said, "Corinna, now adieu!" There is a shady cypress grove below, And thither (if such doubtful things we know) The ghosts of pious birds departed go; 'Tis water'd well, and verdant all the year, And birds obsce
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XVIII: To Macer, blaming him for not writing of love as he did. (search)
, that Sabinus, my departed friend, Could from all quarters now his answers send! Ulysses' hand should to his queen be known, And wretched Phaedra hear from Theseus' son; Dido Aeneas' answer should receive, And Phillis Demophoon's, if alive; Jason should to Hypsipyle return A sad reply, and Sappho cease to mourn: Nor him whom she can ne'er possess, desire, But give to Phoebus fane her votive lyre. As much as you in lofty epics deal, You, Macer, show that you love's passion feel, And sensible of beauty's powerful charm, You hear their call amid the noise of arms. A place for Paris in your verse we find, And Helen's to the young adult'rer kind; There lovely Laodamia mourns her lord, The first that fell by Hector's fatal sword. If well I know you, and your mind can tell, The theme's as grateful, and you like as well To tune your lyre for Cupid as for Mars, And Thracian combats change for Paphian wars; If well I know you, and your works design Your will, you often quit your camp for mine.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 52 (search)
the vices of the former, who was of a loose disposition and led a dissolute life, he was not much affected at his death; but, almost immediately after the funeral, resumed his attention to business, and prevented the courts from being longer closed. The ambassadors from the people of Ilium coming rather late to offer their condolence, he said to them by way of banter, as if the affair had already faded from his memory, "And I heartily condole with you on the loss of your renowned countryman Hector." He so much affected to depreciate Germanicus, that he spoke of his achievements as utterly insignificant, and railed at his most glorious victories as ruinous to the state; complaining of him also to the senate for going to Alexandria without his knowledge, upon occasion of a great and sudden famine at Rome. It was believed that he took care to have him dispatched by Cneius Piso, his lieutenant in Syria. This person was afterwards tried for the murder, and would, as was supposed, have prod
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