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Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Cratylus, Theaetetus, Sophist, Statesman 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hector (New York, United States) or search for Hector (New York, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen heroes: an address delivered by Hon. A. M. Keiley, of Richmond, on Memorial day, at Loudon park, near Baltimore, June 5, 1879. (search)
nt soldier to fallen comrades and to the cause for which they died.] Of all the affecting pictures with which the great Greek epic is filled, none, I think, equals in dramatic power and interest that which portrays the melancholy pilgrimage of Hector's heavy-hearted sire to beg of the remorseless Achilles, for sepulture, the mangled body of his gallant son. The unnumbered woes and impending fate of his country, the peril of his crown, the slaughter of his people, the extermination of his raceboon, worthy the sacrifice of a passion or a prejudice — above all, of a revenge? I said in opening that of all the beautiful pictures in Homer's immortal poem, the chief has ever seemed to me that which portrays the sad journeying of God-like Hector's father to beg the mangled body of his son from his merciless slayer; but in that rich picture, filled as it is with an infinite pathos, no scene so moves the heart as that which exhibits the fierce son of Peleus, saddened and softened by memori