hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 6 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for Ovid (New York, United States) or search for Ovid (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 1 (search)
opum vi.'" Colerus. not to pass through life in obscurity,In obscurity] Silentio. So as to have nothing said of them, either during their lives or at their death. So in c. 2: Eorum ego vitam mortemque juxta æstumo, quoniam de utrâque siletur. When Ovid says, Bene qui latuit, bene vixit, and Horace, Nec vixit malè, qui vivens moriensque fefellit, they merely signify that he has some comfort in life, who, in ignoble obscurity, escapes trouble and censure. But men thus undistinguished are, in the ed cattle. which nature has formed grovelingGroveling] Prona. I have adopted groveling from Mair's old translation. Pronus, stooping to the earth, is applied to cattle, in opposition to erectus, which is applied to man; as in the following lines of Ovid, Met. i. 76: Pronaque cum spectent animalia cætera terram, Os homini sublime dedit, cælumque tueri Jussit, et erectos ad sidera tollere vultus." "------ while the mute creation downward bend Their sight, and to their earthly mother tend, Man looks