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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
an merchant service, and everywhere eluded National vessels of war sent out in pursuit of her. At length she crossed the ocean, and at the close of 1861 was compelled to seek shelter under British guns at Gibraltar, where she was watched by the Tuscarora. Early in the year 1862 she was sold, and thus ended her piratical career. Encouraged by the practical friendship of the British evinced for these corsairs, and the substantial aid they were receiving from British subjects in various ways, e the attention of the British Government to the matter, but every effort to induce it to interpose its authority, in accordance with the letter and spirit of the Queen's proclamation of neutrality, See page 567, volume I. was fruitless. The Tuscarora watched her, but in vain. She was allowed to depart, with ample assistance, and under false pretenses she was supplied with cannon and other materials of war by an English merchant vessel, in a Portuguese harbor of the Western Islands. When a
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.8 (search)
's best wishes. The old captain's words were better than his gold, for they gave me a healthful stimulus. His gold was not to be despised, but his advice inspired me with hope, and I lifted my head, and fancied I saw clearer and further. All men must pass through the bondage of necessity before they emerge into life and liberty. The bondage to one's parents and guardians is succeeded by bondage to one's employers. On the very next day I took a passage for St. Louis, by the steamer Tuscarora ; and, by the end of November, 1859, I reached that busy city. The voyage had proved to me wonderfully educative. The grand pictures of enterprise, activity, and growing cities presented by the river shores were likely to remain with me forever. The successive revelations of scenery and human life under many aspects impressed me with the extent of the world. Mental exclamations of What a river! What a multitude of steamers! What towns, and what a people! greeted each new phase. The
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
American vessels with their cargoes. Seventeen captures in all were made, of which two were ransomed and seven were released in Cuban ports. The Sumter finally found herself blockaded, early in 1862, in the harbor of Algeciras, Spain, by the Tuscarora, Kearsarge, and Ino. Her boilers were now worn out, and there was no opportunity to repair them. So the vessel was sold, and was turned by her new owners into a blockade-runner. This vessel, of all those available for the Confederate navy, ers, but the swiftest and most formidable of them was the Alabama. Battle of the Kearsarge and the Alabama Among the Federal war vessels that were searching for this much-advertised craft was the U. S. S. Kearsarge, whose sister ship, the Tuscarora, was also in foreign waters bent on the same mission. The Kearsarge was built in 1861, was of fourteen hundred and sixty-one tons displacement, and in all respects varied but a few feet in her dimensions from her much-looked — for adversary.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, I. List of officers from Massachusetts in United States Navy, 1861 to 1865. (search)
r. See enlistment, Oct. 28, 1861.Me.Mass.Mass.Jan. 15/62.Actg. Master's Mate.Tuscarora; Keystone State.Special Service; No. Atlantic.Jan. 20, 1866.Hon. discharged.At, Aug. 15, 1863. Credit, Boston.Mass.Mass.Mass.Apr. 5, 1865.Actg. Boatswain.Tuscarora.South Atlantic.Sept. 11, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Boatswain. Hardwick, Chatown, Ward 3.Mass.Mass.Mass.Dec. 17, 1862.Actg. Ensign.Mercedita; Periwinkle; Tuscarora.South Atlantic; Potomac Flotilla; Special Service.--- Dec. 16, 1864.Actg. Mamey, William H.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Jan. 18, 1864.Actg. Master's Mate.Sarah Bruen; Tuscarora.West Gulf; South Atlantic.Jan. 18, 1868.Hon. discharged.Mate. O'Neil, A. F.,orge W., Credit, Blackatone.Mass.Mass.Mass.May 7, 1863.Actg. Master's Mate.Tuscarora.North Atlantic.Oct. 18, 1864.Resigned.Actg. Master's Mate. Rich, John A.,Me.t, Winchester.Mass.Mass.Mass.Dec. 23, 1862.Actg. Master's Mate.Massachusetts; Tuscarora.Supply Steamer; South Pacific.Mar. 9, 1868.Hon. discharged.Actg. Ensign. Jul
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The blockade and the cruisers. (search)
sailing vessels, 137 in all. The number of vessels bought during the whole war amounted to 418, of which 313 were steamers. After the war was over, they were rapidly sold, at less than half their cost. The second measure adopted by the administration was the construction of sloops-of-war. Seven of these had been authorized by Congress in February, but the Department resolved to build eight, assigning two to each navy yard. Four of these vessels, the Oneida. Kearsarge, Wachusett, and Tuscarora, were reproductions of three of the sloops of 1858, which made the work of construction quicker and easier, the designs being already prepared. In the latter part of 1861, eight additional sloops were built, of the same general class, but larger. All these fourteen sloops, like their models of two years before, were excellent vessels, and several of them are still in the service as second-rates and third-rates. The third measure adopted by the Department, on its own responsibility, wi
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix B. (search)
*** Contoocook Class. 10 screw-sloops, clippers, single deck:132,348 Arapahoe132,348Never built. Contoocook (Albany)132,348Sold in 1872. Keosauqua132348Never built. Manitou ( Worcester)132,348 Mondamin132348Never built. Mosholu (Severn)132,348Sold, 1877. Pushmataha (Congress).132,348 Tahgayuta132,348Never built. Wanslosett132348Never built. Willamette132,348Never built. Kearsarge Class. 4 screw-sloops :8 to 101,023 (average). Kearsarge71 031 Oneida91,032Sunk, Yedo, 1870. Tuscarora10997 Wachusett91,032 Shenandoah Class. 6 screw-sloops :8 to 161,367 to 1,533 Canandaigua91,395 Lackawanna91,533 Monongahela91,378 Sacramento91,367Wrecked 1867. Shenandoah91,378 Ticonderoga91,533 Ossipee Class. 4 screw-sloops :10 to 131,240 Juniata91,240 Ossipee91,240 Adirondack91,240Wrecked near Abaco, Aug. 23. 1862. Housatonic91,240Sunk (torpedo), Feb. 17, 1864. Serapis Class. 8 screw-sloops :121,380 Algoma (Benicia)121,380Launched, 1869. Confiance121,380Not built. De