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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.115 (search)
t Salisbury. Vaughn marched in the direction of Morganton, and I set out for Lincolnton, where I expected to find my horses and the detail, under Colonel Napier, whi, p. 495] were now certainly very near, and also marching in the direction of Lincolnton. I was very anxious to get there first, for I feared that if the enemy anticemy was close at hand, and found that he was moving upon another main road to Lincolnton, nearly parallel with that which I was pursuing, and some three miles distant on horses and better equipped than the others, with instructions to get into Lincolnton before the enemy and communicate with Colonel Napier. However, when I had conear this point, and led to other paths which conducted to the main road from Lincolnton to Charlotte. I turned into this road. Procuring guides, I marched some 15 because a large body of Federal cavalry, the same which I had encountered at Lincolnton, were marching some ten or fifteen miles distant on our right flank, keeping
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
h ten thousand small-arms, four cotton factories, and seven thousand bales of cotton. These were all destroyed, with the railway tracks in each direction from Salisbury. The Union prisoners had been removed. The prison-pens where they had suffered were destroyed. On the 17th of April, Stoneman started, with a part of his command, for East Tennessee, taking with him the prisoners, captured artillery, and thousands of negroes. On the following day, General Palmer, whose command was at Lincolnton, sent Major E. C. Moderwell, with two hundred and fifty men of the Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, to destroy the bridge of the Charlotte and South Carolina railroad,over the Catawba River. At that time, Jefferson Davis, having fled from Richmondi was at Charlotte with a very considerable force; and the mounted men of Vaughn and Duke, who had come down from the borders of Virginia, were on the Catawba. On that account it was necessary to move with great Railway bridge over the Catawba River.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
ations begun with General Sherman. details of the conference. armistice and convention agreed on. the latter represented by Washington authorities. military convention. farewell order to the Confederate troops. I was residing in Lincolnton, North Carolina, in February, 1865, and on the 23d of the month received, by telegraph, instructions from the Administration to report for orders to General Lee, recently appointed general-in-chief. A dispatch from General Lee, in anticipation of suche by Confederate officers, and directed him to suspend hostilities. Before these orders were received, if they were ever delivered to General Stoneman, the railroad bridges over the Catawba between Chesterville and Charlotte, and Charlotte and Lincolnton, and the railroad depot at Salisbury, were destroyed by these troops. Pettus's brigade, sent from Greensboroa to protect the railroad bridge over the Yadkin, arrived in time to repel the large party sent to burn it. The arrival of Brigadier-Ge
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memoranda of the operations of my corps, while under the command of General J. E. Johnston, in the Dalton and Atlanta, and North Carolina campaigns. (search)
E. Johnston: The Secretary of War directs that you report by telegram to General R. E. Lee, Petersburg, Virginia, for orders. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. Headquarters, February 22, 1865. General J. E. Johnston: Assume command of the Army of Tennessee and all troops in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Assign General Beauregard to duty under you as you may select. Concentrate all available forces and drive back Sherman. R. E. Lee. Lincolnton, North Carolina, February 23, 1865. General R. E. Lee: It is too late to expect me to concentrate troops capable of driving back Sherman. The remnant of the Army of Tennessee is much divided. So are other troops. I will get information from General Beauregard as soon as practicable. Is any discretion allowed me? I have no staff. J. E. Johnston. Charlotte, February 28, 1865. Hon. J. C. Breckenridge, Secretary of War, Richmond: I respectfully urge that four months pay be
valescence wearing a beautifully patched uniform and underwear made from the linen of the women, who sacrificed their own clothes and comfort for the benefit of the men at the front. Fighting on his own ground was a stimulus to defend the devoted and self-sacrificing women of the South. The Richmond city hospital The Chimborazo hospital, Richmond, Virginia valleys. There were probably at least three laboratories for the preparation of indigenous drugs established: one in Lincolnton, North Carolina; one at Macon, Georgia, and one west of the Mississippi, in which tinctures and extracts were manufactured to some extent. One tincture in particular, well remembered and popularly known in field and hospital service as old indig., was used as a substitute for quinine in malarial fevers, a compound tincture of willow, dogwood, and yellow-poplar barks. Efforts were made to cultivate the poppy (Papaver somniferum) in Florida and North Carolina, and the unripe seed-capsules, when
valescence wearing a beautifully patched uniform and underwear made from the linen of the women, who sacrificed their own clothes and comfort for the benefit of the men at the front. Fighting on his own ground was a stimulus to defend the devoted and self-sacrificing women of the South. The Richmond city hospital The Chimborazo hospital, Richmond, Virginia valleys. There were probably at least three laboratories for the preparation of indigenous drugs established: one in Lincolnton, North Carolina; one at Macon, Georgia, and one west of the Mississippi, in which tinctures and extracts were manufactured to some extent. One tincture in particular, well remembered and popularly known in field and hospital service as old indig., was used as a substitute for quinine in malarial fevers, a compound tincture of willow, dogwood, and yellow-poplar barks. Efforts were made to cultivate the poppy (Papaver somniferum) in Florida and North Carolina, and the unripe seed-capsules, when
rrest's Corps. Samuel W. Ferguson commanded a Cavalry brigade. George D. Johnston led a brigade under Bragg. Joseph R. Davis led a brigade in R. E. Lee's Army. Wirt Adams, a conspicuous Cavalry commander. the Army of Northern Virginia, receiving his division on the organization of the Third Army Corps. He died in Staunton, Virginia, July 18, 1863, from wounds received upon the field of Gettysburg. Major-General Stephen Dodson Ramseur ´╝łU. S.M. A. 1860) was born in Lincolnton, North Carolina, May 31, 1837, and was assigned to the artillery at Fort Monroe. He resigned in April, 1861, to enter the Confederate service. He was made major in the North Carolina State artillery. He was present at the siege of Yorktown, and was placed at the head of a North Carolina regiment in April. He was severely wounded at Malvern Hill, but returned to the army during the winter of 1862-63, having been made brigadier-general in October. He led a brigade with great ability in the Seco
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.16 (search)
with preserving and maintaining an army. Many of the men are lost sight of, and never return. It is recommended that the law be repealed. Furloughs should only be authorized by orders to be granted as circumstances may demand. Foreseeing the many and great difficulties to be encountered in procuring medical supplies from foreign countries through the blockade, attention was given at an early day to the establishment of medical laboratories, and the manufacture of medicines at Lincolnton, North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, Macon and Atlanta, Georgia, and Mobile and Montgomery, Alabama. While these laboratories have been engaged more especially in the manufacture of medicines, heretofore universally procured from abroad. great attention has been given to the manufacture of indigenous remedies, which are now administered by medical officers, in lieu of medicines of foreign origin, with favorable results. In the beginning of the war, the Departm
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
h Carolina not submitted to the people, elects Richard Caswell governor by ordinance, and completes its labors......Dec. 18, 1776. Articles of confederation ratified by North Carolina......April 5, 1778 John Penn, Cornelius Harnett, and John Williams sign the articles of confederation on the part of North Carolina......July 21, 1778 Four hundred North Carolina Whigs under Col. Francis Locke attack a camp of Tories under Lieut.-Col. John Moore, and rout them at Ramsour's Mill, near Lincolnton......June 20, 1780 Battle of Charlotte......Sept. 26, 1780 General Greene successfully conducts his retreat across North Carolina from Cowpens to the river Dan, a distance of 230 miles, pursued by British under Lord Cornwallis......February, 1781 Cornwallis issues at Hillsboro a proclamation inviting all loyal citizens to join him......Feb. 20, 1781 Battle at Guilford Court-house; the British under Cornwallis defeat the Americans under General Greene......March 15, 1781 Gene
r several miles on all the railroads leading out of the town. On the afternoon of April thirteenth, the command moved westward to Statesville and Lenoir, at which latter point General Stoneman left the troops to be disposed of by General Gillem, and proceeded with the prisoners and captured artillery to East Tennessee, reporting his arrival, on the nineteenth, at Greenville, and detailing the disposition of his troops, which was as follows: Palmer's brigade, with headquarters at Lincolnton, North Carolina, to scout down the Catawba river toward Charlotte; Brown's brigade, with headquarters at Morgantown, to connect with Palmer, down the Catawba, and Miller's brigade, with General Gillem, was to take post at Ashville, with directions to open up communication through to Greenville, East Tennessee. The object in leaving the cavalry on the other side of the mountains being to obstruct, intercept, or disperse any troops of the enemy going south, and to capture trains. General Gillem
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