Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Rockingham, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) or search for Rockingham, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence in the light of modern criticism, the. (search)
Already, prior to the year 1778, according to Lecky, the King had laboriously built up in England a system of personal government ; and it was because he was unwilling to have this system disturbed that he then refused, in defiance of the most earnest representations of his own minister and of the most eminent politicians of every party. . . to send for the greatest of living statesmen at the moment when the empire appeared to be in the very agonies of dissolution. . . . Either Chatham or Rockingham would have insisted that the policy of the country should be directed by its responsible ministers and not dictated by an irresponsible sovereign. This refusal of the King to pursue the course which was called for by the constitution, and which would have taken the control of the policy of the government out of his hands, was, according to the same great historian, an act the most criminal in the whole reign of George III. . . . as criminal as any of those acts which led Charles I. to t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rockingham, Charles Watson Wentworth, Marquis of 1730- (search)
repeal of the stamp duties, but before he was able to carry out the other measures in his scheme he was forced by growing opposition to resign his office. On March 28, 1782, when Lord North resigned the office of prime minister, the Marquis of Rockingham was again called to the head of the cabinet. The avowed principle of Rockingham and his colleagues was to acknowledge the independence of the United States and treat with them accordingly. Lord Shelburne still hoped Lord Rockingham. for a rRockingham and his colleagues was to acknowledge the independence of the United States and treat with them accordingly. Lord Shelburne still hoped Lord Rockingham. for a reconciliation and the restoration of the American colonies as a part of the British Empire. John Adams was at The Hague, negotiating a treaty of commerce, and overtures were made to him, as well as to Franklin at Paris, to ascertain whether the United States would not agree to a separate peace, and to something less than entire independence. With this object, the ministry appointed Sir Guy Carleton to supersede General Clinton in command of the British army in America, and commissioned him,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wentworth, Sir John 1737-1820 (search)
Wentworth, Sir John 1737-1820 Colonial governor; born in Portsmouth, N. H., Aug. 9, 1737; nephew of Benning; graduated at Harvard College in 1755. In 1766 he was sent to England as agent of the province, when the Marquis of Rockingham procured his appointment as governor of Benning Wentworth. New Hampshire, which he held in 1767-75. He was also appointed surveyor of the King's woods, which was a lucrative office. On the assumption of all political power by the Provincial Congress of New The Wentworth mansion, little Harbor, N. H. Hampshire, Sir John, the last royal governor, seeing his power depart, and fearing popular indignation, shut himself up in the fort at Portsmouth, and his house was pillaged by a mob. He prorogued the Assembly (July, 1775), retired to Boston, soon afterwards sailed to England, and remained there until 1792, when he was made lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia. He died in Halifax, N. S., April 8, 1820.