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n, and at three o'clock in the afternoon succeeded in exploding one of their caissons and capturing ten of their wounded.--General McClellan's Despatch. An expedition under Colonel Dewey to Pittman's Ferry, Current River, Mo., in pursuit of a band of guerrillas infesting that locality, this day returned to camp at Patterson, Wayne County, Mo., having captured thirteen rebels and made a march of one hundred and sixty miles in eight days.--(Doc. 23.) An engagement occurred near Williamston, N. C., between four companies of the Twentieth regiment of North-Carolina rebels, under the command of Colonel Burgwyn, and a party of National troops.--Richmond Dispatch, November 7. Colonel Lee, of Hamilton's National cavalry, retured to Grand Junction, Miss., after a three days reconnaissance in the direction of Ripley and ten miles south. Ripley was captured and held twenty-four hours, as was also the town of Orizaba. Lieutenant-Colonel Hovis and the Surgeon of Faulkner's rebel ran
the captured. Total. Fair Oaks, Va. 25 92 20 137 Seven Days Battle, Va.   1 1 2 Swift Creek, Va. 1 4   5 Drewry's Bluff, Va. 2 17 4 23 Cold Harbor, Va. 46 159 10 215 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 11 32   43 Chaffin's Farm, Va. 9 50   59 Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864   3   3 Picket, and Skirmishes 4 26 1 31   Totals 98 384 36 518 Present, also, at Siege of Yorktown, Va.; Williamsburg, Va.; Malvern Hill, Va.; Winston, N. C.; Free Bridge, N. C.; Williamston, N. C. Dismal Swamp, Va.: Proctor's Creek, Va.; Bermuda Hundred, Va.; Fall of Richmond. notes.--Recruited principally at Oswego, in the fall of 1861. It left Oswego January 20, 1862, with 750 men, and at Albany received 250 more, who had been recruited in Oneida county. It left the State in February, 1862, and upon its arrival at Washington was assigned to Palmer's Brigade, Casey's Division, Fourth Corps. The regiment fought well at Fair Oaks, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel DeFores
hat the enemy were erecting a fortification and collecting a large force, with the intention of resisting all approaches to Weldon by the river. After taking on board Captain Hammell's company of Zouaves, which are stationed at Plymouth, (a very important point at the mouth of the Roanoke, and also the headquarters of the naval force in the Albemarle Sound,) the fleet proceeded up the river at a rapid rate, meeting with no difficulties until they arrived at a point some six miles above Williamston, where a barricade of rafts and piles were chained together, reaching transversely up and across the river. Just before the fleet arrived at the barricade, a deadly fire from infantry in an ambush was opened upon the Ceres, which was in the advance, killing one seaman, John H. Bridges, of Danvers, Mass., and wounding several more. The Ceres immediately responded with grape, which, with some timely and well-directed shells from the Perry and Shawsheen, soon dispersed the cowardly assassi
ery, left Washington, under my command, for Williamston. On the evening of the same day we encount till the next morning, when we marched for Williamston in the midst of a severe snow-storm. At WiWilliamston we remained a day, in order to give the men an opportunity to rest. At daylight the nextaptured five prisoners, who were paroled at Williamston. The loss on our side consisted in six kil At four P. M., when within six miles of Williamston, cannonading and musket-firing was heard in, led the advance. A fight was expected at Williamston, but when the army approached the town it w for the night in a field five miles beyond Williamston, and on moving again on the morning of the and sleet, over roads yet unsettled, toward Williamston, thirteen miles distant, which we reached ah for much needed rest. While remaining at Williamston our troops cut down the whipping-post, and he march were left on board the gunboats at Williamston and Hamilton. Two deaths from exhaustion o[1 more...]
tack. This phraseology implies that the enemy had advanced on Martinsburg through my lines, and had driven in my brigade. The following statement will show that such was not the case. As you are aware, my line extended on the Potomac from Black Creek to the mouth of the Opequon. When General Lee joined me, upon consultation with Colonel Lee, (who was in command of the brigade the day before the advance of the enemy,) he said that if his pickets were driven in, he would make a stand at Williamston's cross-roads, and, if forced to retire, would fall back to the Stone Bridge, which he would hold to the last extremity. On the morning of the first October, a courier from Colonel Lee informed me that the enemy were advancing on him, and, soon after, another courier notified me that Colonel Lee had fallen back to the cross-roads. Expecting an attack upon my own picket line, I ordered my brigade to be ready to move, and I sent a few men from the provost guard toward the stone bridge to
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, North Carolina, 1863 (search)
NA--1st Mounted Infantry (Detachment). July 4-8: Expedition to TrentonMASSACHUSETTS--17th, 23d and 27th Infantry. NEW JERSEY--9th Infantry. NEW YORK--Battery "K" 3d Light Arty.; 81st and 158th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--Battery "F" 1st Light Arty. July 5: Skirmishes, Warsaw and KenansvilleNEW YORK--3d (Detachment), and 23d (Battalion) Cavalry; Battery "H" 3d Light Arty. (Section). NORTH CAROLINA--1st Mounted Infantry (Detachment). July 5-7: Expedition from Plymouth to Gardner's Bridge and WilliamstonNEW YORK--85th and 96th Infantry (Detachments). PENNSYLVANIA--101st and 103d Infantry. July 6: Action, Free BridgeRHODE ISLAND--Battery "F" 1st Light Arty. July 6: Action, Quaker BridgeMASSACHUSETTS--17th, 23d and 27th Infantry. NEW YORK--Battery "K" 3d Light Arty.; 81st and 158th Infantry. NEW JERSEY--9th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--Battery "F" 1st Light Arty. July 6: Skirmish, TrentonMASSACHUSETTS--23d Infantry. NEW JERSEY--9th Infantry. RHODE ISLAND--Battery "F" 1st Light Arty. July 8:
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Jersey Volunteers. (search)
y 28-June 1. Battles about Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before. Petersburg June 15-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16-September 17. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Embarked for North Carolina September 17, arriving at Morehead City and Carolina City September 21, and duty there till December 5. Non-Veterans left front October 21, and mustered out at Trenton, N. J., December 7, 1864. Moved to Newberne, N. C., December 5, thence to Plymouth, N. C. Expedition to Williamston December 9-14. Expedition up the Roanoke December 22-24. At Plymouth, N. C., till January 7. Expedition to Hard's Island February 1-5 (Cos. B, E, H and I ). Moved to Carolina City January 7, and duty there till March 4. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Kinston March 4-14. Battle of Wise's Forks March 8-10. Occupation of Kinston March 14, and garrison there till March 19. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Provost duty at Goldsboro till A
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
o July 20. Hookerstown July 21. Swift Creek, Street's Ferry and Scupperton July 22, Expedition from Plymouth to Foster's Mills July 26-29 (Detachment). Williamston July 27. Foster's Mills July 27. Sparta July 20. Chowan July 28. Near Washington August 14. Near Rocky Run November 4. Near Janesville NovembeN. C., till April, 1863. Expedition to relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Moved to Plymouth, N. C., May 2, and duty there till July. Expedition to Williamston and Gardiner's Bridge July 5-7 (Detachment). Expedition from Plymouth to Foster's Mills July 26-29. Expedition to Roanoke Island August 6-13, and to Colum the District of the Albemarle till October, 1863. Expedition to relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Expedition from Plymouth to Gardiner's Bridge and Williamston July 5-7 (Detachment). Expedition from Plymouth to Foster's Mills July 26-29. Moved to Newport News, Va., October, and duty there till December. Scout
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
pedition for relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Moved to Plymouth May, 1863, and duty there till March, 1864. Expedition from Plymouth to Nichol's Mills June 28, 1863 (Detachment). Expedition from Plymouth to Gardner's Bridge and Williamston July 5-7. Expedition from Plymouth to Foster's Mills July 26-29. Harrellsville January 20, 1864 (Detachment). Windsor January 30. Fairfield February 16. Moved to New Berne March, 1864; thence to Roanoke Island and to Plymouth Apxpedition from New Berne to Mattamuskeet Lake February 7-14. Expedition for relief of Little Washington April 7-10. Moved to Plymouth, N. C., May, 1863, and duty there till April, 1864. Expedition from Plymouth to Gardner's Bridge and Williamston July 5-7, 1863. Expedition to Foster's Mills July 26-29. Herford December 10. Harrellsville January 20, 1864 (Detachment). Windsor January 30. Siege of Plymouth April 17-20. Regiment mostly captured April 20. Those not cap
e C. Lee, of the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, in which it remained during the whole period of its term of service, very much to the satisfaction of the whole regiment. Before the regiment had been forty-eight hours in Newbern, orders were received to be prepared to start on an expedition immediately. Arriving by transports to Washington, N. C., on the 31st of October, on the 2d of November the whole force, under command of Major-General Foster, took up its line of march to Williamston. There were some slight skirmishes with the enemy on the route, but nothing of importance transpired during the time. On the morning of the 10th December, the regiment left its camp to join an expedition to Goldsborough, having for its object the destruction of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. The Fifth was assigned the second post of honor, and the care of the wagon train was intrusted to it. Companies H and E were posted about three miles from regimental headquarters, and, on the
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