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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
y letter to the Secretary of War, suggesting the conference, I wrote: Thus far the numbers and condition of this army have at no time justified our assuming the offensive .... The difficulty of obtaining the means of establishing a battery near Evansport Evansport is on the Potomac below Alexandria, at the mouth of Quantico Creek. . . .. has given me the impression that you cannot at present put this army in condition to assume the offensive. If I am mistaken in this, and you can furnish thEvansport is on the Potomac below Alexandria, at the mouth of Quantico Creek. . . .. has given me the impression that you cannot at present put this army in condition to assume the offensive. If I am mistaken in this, and you can furnish those means, I think it important that either his Excellency the President, yourself, or some one representing you, should here, upon the ground, confer with me on this all-important question. In a letter dated September 29th, 1861, the Secretary wrote that the President would reach my camp in a day or two for conference. He came for that object September 30th, and the next evening, by his appointmente he was waited on by Generals Beauregard, Gustavus W. Smith, and myself. In discussing the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
and skill as her ordnance and executive officer was due the character of her battery, which proved so efficient. It consisted of 2 7-inch rifles, heavily reenforced around the breech with 3-inch steel bands, shrunk on. These were the first heavy guns so made, and were the bow and stern pivots. There were also 2 6-inch rifles of the same make, and 6 9-inch smooth-bore broadside,--10 guns in all. During the summer and fall of 1861 I had been stationed at the batteries on the Potomac at Evansport and Aquia Creek, blockading the river as far as possible. In January, 1862, I was ordered to the Virginia as one of the lieutenants, reporting to Commodore French Forrest, who then commanded the navy yard at Norfolk. Commodore Franklin Buchanan was appointed to the command,--an energetic and high-toned officer, who combined with daring courage great professional ability, standing deservedly at the head of his profession. In 1845 he had been selected by Mr. Bancroft, Secretary of the Na
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 8: winter campaign in the Valley. 1861-62. (search)
f Pendleton, Highland, and Bath. Winchester was again exposed to the advance of the enemy from four directions. The difficulties of General Jackson's position were, at the same time, aggravated by a diminution of his force. General Loring having been assigned to a distant field of operations, his command was divided between the Valley and Potomac districts. The brigade of General Anderson, composed of Tennessee troops, was sent, with two regiments from that of Colonel Taliaferro, to Evansport, on General Johnston's extreme right. The brigade of Colonel Gilham, now commanded by the gallant Colonel J. S. Burks, was retained by General Jackson; and was henceforth denominated the 2d Brigade of the Army of the Valley. Two Virginia regiments only, the 23d and 37th, remained to Colonel Taliaferro. These, increased afterwards by the addition of the 10th Virginia, composed the 3d Brigade of the Army of the Valley. The three militia brigades were continually dwindling through defectiv
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 9: General view of the campaigns of 1862. (search)
Clellan, upon both banks of the Potomac; while its wings extended from the lower regions of the State of Maryland, to the Alleghanies. It was confronted by the army of General Joseph E. Johnston, with its right wing resting upon the Potomac to Evansport, and commanding the river by a formidable battery, its centre about Manassa's Junction, and its left at Winchester under General Jackson. This army was composed of volunteers enlisted for one year; and the hour when their term of service expiro its capture, every movement was to converge. General McClellan was to drive back the left wing of the Confederate army at Winchester, by — the forces under Shields and Banks, to insulate and overpower the right wing resting on the Potomac at Evansport, and to surround and crush General Johnston at Manassas, or else to force him toward Richmond, and pursue him. The army on the Peninsula, setting out from Fortress Monroe, was to press back General Magruder, and assail the capital from the East
The practice was kill or cure, but it was in a vast majority of cases, the latter; and men who stood the hardship thrived upon it. The Marylanders, too, were a marvel of patience. Self-made exiles, not only from the accustomed comforts of home, but cut off from communication with their absent ones and harrowed by vague stories of wrong and violence about them — it would have been natural had they yielded to the combined strain on mind and matter. At midwinter I had occasion to visit Evansport and Acquia creek. It had been bitter cold; a sudden thaw had made the air raw and keen, while my horse went to his girths at every plunge. More than once I had to dismount in mire girth-deep to help him on. Suddenly I came upon a Maryland camp-supports to a battery. Some of the soldiers I had known as the gayest and most petted of ballroom and club; and now they were cutting wood and frying bacon, as if they had never done anything else. Hands that never before felt an ax-helve plied
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 19: effort to effect exchange of prisoners-evacuation of Manassas-visit to Fredericksburg. (search)
never the enemy chooses to advance, and that he will be ready to take the field before yourself, clearly indicates prompt effort to disencumber yourself of everything which would interfere with your rapid movement when necessary, and such thorough examination of the country in your rear as would give you exact knowledge of its roads and general topography, and enable you to select a line of greater natural advantages than that now occupied by your forces. The heavy guns at Manassas and Evansport, needed elsewhere, and reported to be useless in their present position, would necessarily be abandoned in a hasty retreat. I regret that you find it impossible to move them. The subsistence stores should, when removed, be placed in positions to answer your future wants. Those cannot be determined until you have furnished definite information as to your plans, especially the line to which you would remove in the contingency of retiring. The Commissary-General had previously stopped
ountered a strong fort one mile out, which was evacuated by Jackson last night. The people generally were intensely delighted, and hail the coming of the Union army as a harbinger of peace and future prosperity. The regiments, as they passed, were cheered and greeted from the houses with various tokens of welcome, which were responded to warmly by officers and men.--(Doc. 87.) Serg. Wade, with a squad of the Carolina light dragoons, captured two of the enemy, about one mile from the Evansport batteries. The prisoners proved to be Lt. Wm. T. Baum, of Philadelphia, belonging to Gen. Hooker's staff, and Mr. Gregg, telegraph operator, of the same division of the Federal army.--Norfolk Day Book, March 19. A battalion, comprising the First Nebraska regiment and a portion of Curtis's Iowa cavalry regiment, under the command of Colonel W. W. Lowe, attacked a force of rebels six hundred strong, this morning, defeating them and taking possession of the town of Paris, Tenn., but bei
April 1. The United States steamers Jacob Bell and Stepping Stone, visited Evansport, Va., this day. A boat's crew from each vessel was sent on shore. They visited nearly all the batteries in that vicinity, including one on a high hill, about half a mile back of Evansport, where was found the gun that Capt. Eastman had attempted unsuccessfully to burst. It is a thirty-two pounder. This battery, aided by field-pieces, was intended to cover the retreat of the rebels through the woods in Evansport, where was found the gun that Capt. Eastman had attempted unsuccessfully to burst. It is a thirty-two pounder. This battery, aided by field-pieces, was intended to cover the retreat of the rebels through the woods in the rear, in the event of their being driven from the lower battery. It was defended by rifle-pits. Several men went a considerable distance into the country, but there were no signs of rebel troops nor inhabitants. Both parties of seamen subsequently returned on shore, in command of Lieut. Commanding McRea, of the Jacob Bea, proceeding inland, where they found five rebel store-houses, containing hay, cutting-machines, platform scales, and other useful apparatus and implements. They set f
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
n, Colonel Williamson, of the Engineer Department, was then engaged in the construction of field-works on the Rappahannock, to improve that line, naturally much stronger than the present one. Early in September the construction of batteries at Evansport was begun under the direction of Brigadier-General Trimble, by order of the War Department, to prevent the navigation of the Potomac by vessels of the United States. About the 20th of the month I became convinced that the increasing strengty-five hundred. This, of course decided the question of active operations then. Mr. Davis then proposed some operations of a partisan character, especially an expedition, by a detachment, against Hooker's division, in Maryland, opposite to Evansport. I objected to this proposition, because we had no means of transporting any sufficient body of men to the Maryland shore quickly; and the Potomac being controlled by Federal vessels-of-war, such a body, if thrown into Maryland, would inevitab
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
s soon as the country should be in condition for the marching of armies, it was impossible then, without much suffering by the troops, and great sacrifice of military property, including baggage. On that account, I thought the measure should be postponed until the end of the winter, and represented that the artillery-horses could not then draw field-pieces with their ammunition-chests, nor loaded caissons. This brought on a long discussion of the best mode of bringing off the guns of the Evansport batteries, which prolonged the conference until near sunset. It terminated without the giving of orders, but with the understanding on my part that the army was to fall back as soon as practicable. The discussion was understood to be strictly confidential; yet, on reaching the hotel, going directly from the President's office, I was asked by Colonel Pender, Sixth North Carolina regiment, just arrived in the city on his way to the army, after leave of absence, if I had heard a report t
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