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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), What shall we do with them? (search)
osition, and through systematic disuse loses his moral and many of his physical faculties. Very white men have exhibited no greater capacity for resisting the degrading influences of bondage. Mr. Dupuis, who was long the British Vice-Consul at Mogadore, tells us that the Europeans and Americans who were rescued from enslavement in the desert, were found to have their spirits completely broken by their masters. When they came into Mogadore, he says, They appeared degraded, and below the negro Mogadore, he says, They appeared degraded, and below the negro slave — every spring of hope or exertion was destroyed in their minds — they were abject, servile, and brutified. This is said by a white observer of white men just emancipated — we believe that no Pro-Slavery scribbler has said anything worse of the liberated black man. The gist of the matter is just this: if we should take Gov. Seymour, for instance — we take him as at present the leading white man of New York — if we should put him upon a year-long course of short rations and sharp flog
bling themselves to cut out the wounded part. There is reason for supposing that the discovery of the various poisons used for weapons, and the practice of applying them to such a purpose, arose spontaneously and separately in the various quarters of the globe. Poisoned weapons are used by the Negroes, Bushmen, and Hottentots of Africa; in the Indian Archipelago, New Hebrides, and New Caledonia. They are employed in Bootan, Assam, by the Stiens of Cambodia, and formerly by the Moors of Mogadore. The Parthians and Scythians used them in ancient times. The composition of the poison varies in different races; the Bushmen, Hottentots, and others, using the venomous secretions of serpents and caterpillars. In the Bosjesman country, Southern Africa, the natives hunt the puff-adders, in order to extract the poison. They creep upon the reptile unawares, and break its back at a single blow. The poison-glands are then extracted; the venom is very thick, like glycerine, and has a fain
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Tales and Sketches (search)
er-side, and he did not come back. And another year passed, and then the old sailors and fishermen shook their heads solemnly, and said that the Lively Turtle was a lost ship, and would never come back to port. And poor Anna had her bombazine gown dyed black, and her straw bonnet trimmed in mourning ribbons, and thenceforth she was known only as the Widow Matson. And how was it all this time with David himself? Now you must know that the Mohammedan people of Algiers and Tripoli, and Mogadore and Sallee, on the Barbary coast, had been for a long time in the habit of fitting out galleys and armed boats to seize upon the merchant vessels of Christian nations, and make slaves of their crews and passengers, just as men calling themselves Christians in America were sending vessels to Africa to catch black slaves for their plantations. The Lively Turtle fell into the hands of one of these sea-robbers, and the crew were taken to Algiers, and sold in the market place as slaves, poor Da
t till the last extremity. The Sardinian General, Mezzacopa, had likewise proceeded with troops towards the Neapolitan fortress of Civitella, on the Trouto, and would commence an immediate attack unless surrendering. The Official Opinione denies the rumored existence of negotiations between Sardinia and Rome. Spain. Spain had agreed with Morocco that the payment of the indemnity, 200,000,000 reals, shall be completed immediately. The customs and duties at Tangiers and Mogadore are to be hypothecated to Spain for remaining indemnity. Austria. It was reported, via Hamburg, that orders had been sent to Trieste to arm at once all sailing vessels of the Austrian navy. They are to be stationed at Zara, Cattoro, Fiume, Ragusa, &c. Twelve gunboats are to be sent to the Guif Guarrero, to watch the coast of Turkey. The Levant Herald says the Hasue Tarius are to be renewed for fourteen years, and also says a general suspension of Galata bankers and merchants i