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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 82 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 14 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
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Vexed and annoyed at our impudence and pertinacity, they pointed more than a hundred guns at the town, and commenced an earth-shaking cannonade; the smoke and flame from their pieces on the Stafford Heights were so great that it seemed as if the earth was vomiting forth sulphurous lava. Houses fell, timbers crashed, dust rose, flames ascended, and, from our position as spectators in the boxes of this amphitheatre, it seemed as if we were innocently gazing at some noisy and smoky episode of Napoleon's wars, as often represented on the French stage. The whole town seemed alive; one ran here, another there. Unlucky citizens, who remained too long, or had screened themselves in hopes of the enemy's speedy arrival, now came forth from their hiding-places, and not a few Dutch Jews were observed panting under heavy loads of tobacco, which they had secreted. Shells of every size and form were screaming and whizzing through the air, and their explosion was always attended by a sudden uprisi
them. And as for my position here, I believe we have been together in hotter places before. The great hero then calmly resumed his writing, cannon-shot ploughing up the ground all around him and covering his Ms. with dust, so that, like one of Napoleon's generals under similar circumstances, he was in no need of sand to dry up his ink. In the mean time the trains had been saved, and the bold Yankees that had attacked our rear had been driven back with fearful loss, leaving the greater part of rse-artillery. It had been reported to General Lee that the enemy had massed large forces opposite to his centre, or the lower part of the little valley just described, which induced him to suppose that General Pope had determined to try one of Napoleon's manoeuvres de force, and would attempt, by overwhelming numbers, to break through the centre in a sudden attack, trusting to dispose of the two wings easily thereafter. Our noble leader had not been deceived, and his measures to frustrate the
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 10: (search)
was so near at hand was thus left for the enemy, by whom it was afterwards used to the greatest advantage. The importance, nay the necessity, in a war of such magnitude, carried on over so vast and thinly-populated a territory, of establishing great magazines for the collection and storage of provisions for the army, very often occurred to me during the struggle in America, and I have, on several occasions, expressed my opinion with regard to it. Had the Confederate authorities, following Napoleon's example, established at the beginning of the war (when it might easily have been done) large depots of army-supplies at points not exposed, like Richmond, to raids of cavalry, I am convinced that it would have had a material influence on the final issue of the great conflict. The difficulties that were experienced during the last two years of the war in supporting the army, and the terrible privations to which men and animals were subjected in consequence of early maladministration and n
ed ability. His mind was naturally shrewd, and, except in some marked instances, he appeared to possess an instinctive knowledge of men. But the processes of his brain, on ordinary occasions, exhibited rather activity and force than profoundness of insight. His mental organization seemed to be sound and practical rather than deep and comprehensive. He read little when I knew him, and betrayed no evidences of wide culture. His education was that of the gentleman rather than the scholar. Napoleon's Maxims, a translation of Jomini's Treatise on War, and one or two similar works, were all in which he appeared to take pleasure. His whole genius evidently lay in the direction of his profession, and even here many persons doubted the versatility of his faculties. It will remain an interesting problem whether he would have made a great infantry commander. He was confident of his own ability; always resented the dictum that he was a mere cavalry officer; and I believe, at one time, it w
Such things were common with Mosby, who seemed to enjoy them greatly; but in the spring of 1862 the tables were turned upon the partisan. General Stuart sent him from the Chickahominy to carry a confidential message to General Jackson, then in the Valley. He was resting at one of the wayside stations on the Central Railroad while his horse was feeding, when a detachment of Federal cavalry surprised and captured him-making prize also of a private note from Stuart to Jackson, and a copy of Napoleon's Maxims accompanying it. Mosby was carried to the Old Capitol, but was soon exchanged; and chancing to discover on his route down the bay that General Burnside was going soon to reinforce General Pope in Culpeper, he hastened on his arrival with that important information to General Lee, who telegraphed it, doubtless, to General Lee, who telegraphed it, doubtless, to General Jackson at Gordonsville. It is probable that the battle of Cedar Run, where General Pope was defeated, was fought b
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. (search)
s to love him; and since his death even strangers have spoken of him in terms of the warmest affection, so deeply had he impressed all who saw him. He was scarce twenty-one when he died, and in the flush of youth and joy and hope. He was a native of the great State of Mississippi, where hearts are warm and tempers impulsive. The bright sun of the farthest South seemed to have fired his blood; and on the battle-field he fought with the gallantry and nerve, the vigour and elan of one of Napoleon's young heroes of the grand armee. His laughing face looked out on the world with an exquisite frankness; the lips were mobile, joyous, and expressive; the large, honest eyes met your own with smiles in their blue depths, which spoke the real character of the youth. I was first attracted toward the youthful stranger by the dash and nerve of his behaviour on the field. It was in the battle of Cold Harbour, where he served as a volunteer upon the staff of General Stuart. He was the mo
s to love him; and since his death even strangers have spoken of him in terms of the warmest affection, so deeply had he impressed all who saw him. He was scarce twenty-one when he died, and in the flush of youth and joy and hope. He was a native of the great State of Mississippi, where hearts are warm and tempers impulsive. The bright sun of the farthest South seemed to have fired his blood; and on the battle-field he fought with the gallantry and nerve, the vigour and elan of one of Napoleon's young heroes of the grand armee. His laughing face looked out on the world with an exquisite frankness; the lips were mobile, joyous, and expressive; the large, honest eyes met your own with smiles in their blue depths, which spoke the real character of the youth. I was first attracted toward the youthful stranger by the dash and nerve of his behaviour on the field. It was in the battle of Cold Harbour, where he served as a volunteer upon the staff of General Stuart. He was the mo
s character, everybody has had an opportunity of forming an opinion upon the subject-at least of his military character. Some persons, I know-Captain Quattlebum for instance, who is a man of no great brains himself, however, confidentially speaking-say that Lee is not a great general, and compares him to Napoleon, who, they say, won greater victories, and followed them up to better results. Such comparisons, to my thinking, are foolish. I am no great scholar, but I have read enough about Napoleon's times to know that they were very different from General Lee's. He, I mean Napoleon, was at the head of a French army, completely disciplined, and bent on glory. They wanted their general to fight on every occasion, and win more glory. If he didn't go on winning glory he was not the man for them. The consequence was that Napoleon, who was quite as fond of glory as his men, fought battles whenever he could get at the enemy, and as his armies were thoroughly disciplined, with splendid eq
wd, and see if you cannot tell him from the family likeness. Following this suggestion, my gaze all at once was arrested by a plainly clad person in the midst of the cortege — a farmer apparently, for he wore a brown linen coat and common straw hat, with nothing whatever to indicate the soldier or dignitary in his appearance. But his dress disappeared from view and was speedily forgotten; the face absorbed attention from the first moment; that face was the most startling reproduction of Napoleon's — the first Emperor's. There was no possibility of making a mistake in this-every one who was familiar with the portraits of Napoleon recognised the prince at a glance. He was taller and more portly than the Man of destiny; but the family resemblance in feature and expression was absolutely perfect. I needed no one to say This is a Bonaparte. The blood of the Corsican was there for all to recognise; this was a branch of that tree whose boughs had nearly overspread a continent. Soon
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
with a few thousand men, we hurled the whole Federal army back, crippling and demoralizing it, with trifling loss to our own troops; and Chancellorsville as an instance of an offensive battle, where we dislodged the Federals, it is true, but at such a terrible sacrifice that half a dozen such victories would have ruined us. It will be remembered that Stonewall Jackson once said that we sometimes fail to drive the enemy from a position. They always fail to drive us. I reminded him, too, of Napoleon's advice to Marmont, to whom he said, when putting him at the head of an invading army, Select your ground, and make your enemy attack you. I recall these points, simply because I desire to have it distinctly understood that, while I first suggested to General Lee the idea of an offensive campaign, I was never persuaded to yield my argument against the Gettysburg campaign, except with the understanding that we were not to deliver an offensive battle, but to so maneuvre that the enemy shoul
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