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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 2 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for Arlington Heights (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Arlington Heights (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
I did so, and was called upon to explain the proposition to General Scott. But he bade it wait, as I supposed he would, and the movement was never made, although it was very earnestly pressed upon the President and Cabinet by Mr. Chase. Scott did not consent to have our armies cross the Potomac until the movement in which Ellsworth was killed, on the 24th of May, the day after the vote on the ordinance of secession. On that occasion we marched into Alexandria to take a position at Arlington Heights, within short cannon shot of Washington. It may not be improper to state that I was sustained in my view of the importance of the occupation of Manassas Junction by the Committee on the Conduct of the War. That committee made a very full and stringent report upon the subject, in which it characterized the omission to seize Manassas Junction at this time as the great error of the campaign. There would have been this advantage at any rate if we had intrenched ourselves at Manassas