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E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart's report of operations after Gettysburg. (search)
mmand, by the enemy having occupied our late ground before my command could be informed of the change. None, however, were either lost or captured. During the 4th, which was quite rainy, written instructions were received from the Commanding General as to the order of march back to the Potomac, to be undertaken at nightfall. In this order, one brigade of cavalry was ordered to move, as heretofore stated, by way of Cash Town, guarding that flank and bringing up the rear on the road via Greenwood to Williamsport, which was the route designated for the main portion of the wagon trains and ambulances, under the special charge of Brigadier-General Imboden, who had a mixed command of artillery, infantry and cavalry. Previous to these instructions, I had, at the instance of the Commanding General, instructed Brigadier-General Robertson, whose two brigades (his own and Jones') were now on the right near Fairfield, Pennsylvania, that it was essentially necessary for him to hold the Jac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
having occupied our late ground before my command could be notified of the change; none, however, were either lost or captured. During the 4th, which was quite rainy, written instructions were received from the Commanding-General as to the order of march back to the Potomac, to be undertaken at nightfall. In this order two brigades of cavalry (Baker's and Hampton's) were ordered to move, as heretofore stated, by way of Cashtown, guarding that flank, bringing up the rear on the road via Greenwood to Willamsport, which was the route designated for the main portion of the wagon trains and ambulances, under the special charge of Brigadier-General Imboden, who had a mixed command of artillery, infantry and cavalry (his own). Previous to these instructions I had, at the instance of the Commanding-General, instructed Brigadier-General Robertson, whose two brigades (his own and Jones') were now on the right near Fairfield, Pennsylvania, that it was essentially necessary for him to hold
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
, halting one day at Chambersburg to secure supplies. The marching was as rapid as the weather and the detours made by Major-General Early and Brigadier-General George H. Steuart would admit. Early, having marched parallel with us as far as Greenwood, there turned off towards Gettysburg and York. At Carlisle General George H. Steuart, who had been detached to McConnellsburg from Greencastle, rejoined the corps, bringing some cattle and horses. At Carlisle, Chambersburg, and Shippensburg rrg. Agreeably to the views of the General commanding, I did not burn Carlisle barracks. Expedition to York and Wrightsville. Colonel E. V. White's cavalry battalion reported to me at Chambersburg, and was sent to General Early, then at Greenwood. Arriving at Cashtown, General Early sent Gordon's brigade with White's cavalry direct to Gettysburg, taking the rest of the division by the Mummasburg road. In front of Gettysburg White charged and routed the Twenty-Sixth regiment Pennsylv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. A. Early's report of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ade, the regimental ordnance wagons, one wagon with cooking utensils for each regiment (including the officers), and fifteen empty wagons to use in gathering supplies, and carrying no other baggage, I moved towards Gettysburg. Before leaving Greenwood I had the iron-works of Mr. Thaddeus Stevens, near that place, burned and destroyed, as the enemy had made it an invariable rule to burn all such establishments wherever he had gone in the Confederacy. On reaching the forks of the road, on the dingly at daylight, on the morning of the 30th, I put my whole command in motion, taking the route with the main body through Weigalstown and East Berlin, in the direction of Heidlersburg, from which place I could move either to Shippensburg or Greenwood by the way of Arendtsburg, as circumstances might require. I, at the same time, sent Colonel White's cavalry on the turnpike from York towards Gettysburg, to ascertain if any force of the enemy was on that road. At East Berlin a small squad o
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
e to Cashtown, and was followed by Longstreet with Hood and McLaws from Chambersburg as far as Greenwood, about 11 miles. Here they bivouacked about 2 P. M. Lee accompanied this march, and also bivouacked at Greenwood. Pickett's division was left at Chambersburg to guard the rear until Imboden's cavalry should arrive, and Law's brigade was detached from Hood's division and sent to New Guilford htown at 5 A. M., and become engaged at Gettysburg about 10. Soon after Anderson had passed Greenwood, Hood and McLaws were starting to follow, when they encountered Johnson's division of the 2d cden back from his interview with Lee to meet his troops, who, about 4 P. M., marched from near Greenwood with orders to come to Gettysburg, 17 miles. About midnight they bivouacked four miles from thWashington artillery and Alexander's battalion), which was ordered to follow the infantry from Greenwood at midnight, was much detained upon the road by passing trains, and did not reach the field un
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 18: Gettysburg: third day (search)
ceased to fall, but the sky remained threatening. About 6 A. M., we took our place in the column, and marched 19 hours until 1 A. M. that night. Then we bivouacked until four near Monterey Springs on the Blue Ridge. We then marched again for 14 hours, and bivouacked about 6 P. M. two or three miles beyond Hagerstown. Ewell's corps, moving behind ours, did not leave the vicinity of Gettysburg until about noon on the 5th. The wagon-train under Imboden moved on roads to our right, via Greenwood to Williamsport. It made better speed than our column of infantry and artillery, but at a cost of human suffering which it is terrible to contemplate. Some of the wounded were taken from the wagons dead at Williamsport, and many who were expected to recover died from the effects of the journey. Among these, it was said, were Gens. Pender and Semmes, neither of whom had been thought mortally wounded. Imboden gives a harrowing account of the movement of the train, as follows:— Afte
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
omac at Shepardstown on the 22d, marched along the western base of South Mountain, and reached Greenwood on the 24th. Resuming his march on the 26th, and proceeding by way of Cashtown, Mummasburg, ay way of Berlin toward Heidlersburg, so as to be able to move thence either to Shippensburg or Greenwood, as circumstances might demand, and encamped that night about three miles from Heidlersburg. emy. General Longstreet, with two divisions, followed General Hill, on the 30th, and was at Greenwood that night. He left his Third Division (Pickett's) at Chambersburg, guarding the trains, to a) at Fayetteville. General Longstreet, with two of his divisions (McLaw's and Hood's), was at Greenwood; his Third Division (Pickett's) at Chambersburg. General Ewell, with Rodes's division, was aty Hill, and which seemed unoccupied. Johnson's division had passed the night of the 30th at Greenwood, and had moved forward during the day by the road thence to Gettysburg. Before Johnson could
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 24: the battle of Gettysburg begun (search)
ucceeded in reaching Heidelsburg, about ten miles north of Gettysburg, the evening of the 30th, but Johnson's division, obeying the same orders, had gone from Carlisle back toward Chambersburg. He, however, took a left-hand road by the way of Greenwood, and encamped the same night near Scotland, a hamlet west of the mountain. The other two corps-Longstreet's and Hill'swere not far in advance of Ewell's; for, though they had shorter distances they had fewer routes from which to choose. Hill's corps led, and was at or near Cashtown the evening of the 30th. Longstreet, with two divisions, remained that night near Greenwood, at the west entrance to Cashtown Gap. One division only — that of Pickett-caring for Lee's transportation, remained behind, at Chambersburg. The Confederate commander then had, the night of June 30th, the bulk of his army-probably between 50,000 and 60,000 men-within fifteen miles of Gettysburg. His leading division I (Heth's of Hill's corps) had already enc
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Grace Greenwood-Mrs. Lippincott. (search)
he risk of scepticism, and to feel is to invite sentimentalism, it is charming to meet a girl who is not ashamed to laugh and cry, and sold and joke, and love and worship, as her grandmother did before her. But this is not a review of Grace Greenwood's writings. Litera scripta manet. Those who wish to see the cream of our magazine writings from 1845 to 1852., will find it in Greenwood leaves, first and second series. About this time, her Poems were published. To say that they are beautifful falsehood, fair and fatal enchantress, sovereign sorceress of the world I the end is not yet, and the day may not be far distant when thou shalt lay the asp to thine own bosom, and die. Since her marriage to Leander K. Lippincott, Grace Greenwood's pen has been employed chiefly in writings for the young. She edits the Little Pilgrim, a monthly devoted to the amusement, the instruction, and the well-being of little folks. Its best articles are her contributions. These have been collec
ly gone. Having no knowledge of the direction he had taken, Stuart continued to Carlisle, and thence, by a wide circuit, his men well-nigh exhausted, to Gettysburg, where he appeared on Lee's left. A. P. Hill's advance, under Pettigrew, reached Cashtown, where by its orders it should have awaited the concentration of Lee's army, its mission being the taking and holding of Lee's chosen defensive position. Unfortunately, on the 30th, while Longstreet was still west of the mountains, at Greenwood, and before even Hill's corps was closed up, Pettigrew's brigade, of Heth's division, was allowed to march over the eight miles from Cashtown to Gettysburg in search of shoes. In the vicinity of that town it came in collision with Buford's Federal cavalry, and the great battle of Gettysburg was thus unwittingly and unordered begun, though but in a skirmish. Pettigrew hastened back to Cashtown, late in the day, and on the morning of July 1st, at 5 a. m., A. P. Hill, always ready and anxio
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