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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter25: invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
till the 27th, and rested two days at Chambersburg, in Pennsylvania. The cavalry under General Imboden, ordered on General Ewell's left, was due as far north as McConnellsburg, but had halted at Hancock. On the 28th, General Lee issued orders for the march upon Harrisburg. General Ewell had marched his main column through Chambersburg to Carlisle. His column, intending to move east of the mountains through Emmitsburg and Gettysburg, had marched parallel to the main column as far as Greenwood, when orders were renewed for it to march east through Gettysburg. General Early, commanding, ordered Gordon's brigade and a detachment of cavalry through Gettysburg; but his other troops marched north through Mummasburg. The failure of the Imboden cavalry on his left caused General Ewell to send General George H. Steuart through McConnellsburg as guard of that flank. Steuart's command rejoined him at Carlisle. As General Ewell marched he sent us three thousand head of beef cattle and
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 26: Gettysburg-First day. (search)
ns of Army of Northern Virginia, night of June 30. General Lee's Headquarters, Greenwood. First Corps, Chambersburg, twenty-four miles to Gettysburg; part at Greenwood, sixteen miles. Second Corps and Jenkins's cavalry, Heidlersburg, ten miles; part near Green Village, twenty-three miles (Johnson's division and trains). Third Corps, near Greenwood, sixteen miles, and Cashtown, eight miles. Stuart's cavalry, circling between York and Carlisle, out of sight. Robertson's cavalry, in Virginia, beyond reach. Imboden's cavalry, at Hancock, out of sight. The Confederates not intending to precipitate battle. Positions of Army of the Potomac. his reserve artillery with Anderson's division at Fayetteville. The armies on the night of June 30 stood thus: The Confederate: First Corps, two divisions at Greenwood (except one brigade detached under orders from Headquarters at New Guilford) ; Pickett's three brigades at Chambersburg, left under orders from Headquarters to