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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Evacuation of Richmond. (search)
ral Kershaw, who had only been a few days under my command, behaved with his usual coolness and judgment. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. S. Ewell, Late Lieutenant-General, C. S. A. Report of General J. B. Kershaw. Camden, S. C., October 9th, 1865. Major,—On the morning of Monday, the 3d of April last, I moved in obedience to the orders of Lieutenant-General Ewell, from my position on the lines near Fort Gilmer, through Richmond to Mayo's Bridge, reporting in pers these just encomiums the little command of Lieutenant-Colonel Barham, and especially that officer. I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. B. Kershaw, Late Major-General C. S. A. Major Campbell Brown, Richmond, Virginia. Camden, April 29, 1867. my Dear Major:—Your favor covering copy of my report came to hand this day, and you will please accept my thanks for the same. You are correct in your recollection of the position at Sailor's Creek; Simms was on the right of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's method of making war. (search)
mbia on or before February 21. This letter purports to be dated Camp near Camden, S. C., February 26, 1865. Camden is at least thirty miles east of Columbia, andCamden is at least thirty miles east of Columbia, and on the opposite side of the Catawba river. By the roundabout course pursued by the army, it is double that distance. The crossing of the river occupied several days, and was effected twenty or thirty miles north of Camden. The waters were very high, and once across, there was no such thing as returning. Everybody and everythpidly as possible. Only a small part of Sherman's army marched through or near Camden. The knowledge or consideration of these facts shows how improbable, if not abircumstances, that any letter written by one of Sherman's Bummers, near Camden, South Carolina, could afterwards have found its way to the streets of Columbia. It y regiments of Sherman's army which might have passed on the march near Camden, South Carolina, but a single one—a New Jersey regiment—was from the Middle States. Al