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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
Fort Walker and the other on Bay Point as Fort Beauregard. On Nov. 15th, 1861, General T. W. Shet Welles (after Secretary Welles), and of Fort Beauregard to Fort Seward (after the Secretary of Sts to pass up midway between Forts Walker and Beauregard, receiving and returning the fire of both, tand conscious strength. Bay Point and Fort Beauregard, after capture. From a war-time sketch. tle of the Union fleet with Forts Walker and Beauregard. 2.-hoisting the Stars and Stripes over Fortvailed themselves of the occasion to give Fort Beauregard the benefit of their broadsides. Meantim loud that they startled the defenders of Fort Beauregard. Captain Stephen Elliott, Jr., who waotal, 23 guns. Twenty guns were found in Fort Beauregard, one of which was a 6-inch rifle, burst, f the true soldier. Of the attack upon Fort Beauregard, General Drayton says: The attack upon thVolunteers. Of the above, 149 garrisoned Fort Beauregard, under the immediate command of Capt. Ste[4 more...]
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, May, 1863. (search)
more beautiful was the scenery. At 4 P. M. we were assured by a citizen on the bank that the gunboats really had retreated; and at 5.30 our doubts were set at rest, to our great satisfaction, by descrying the Confederate flag flying from Fort Beauregard, high above the little town of Harrisonburg. After we had landed, I presented my letter of introduction from General Hebert to Colonel Logan, who commands the fort. He introduced me to a German officer, the engineer. They gave me an account of the attack and repulse of the four Federal gunboats under Commodore Woodford, and supposed to have been the Pittsburg ironclad), the General Price, the Arizona, and another. Fort Beauregard is a much more formidable looking work than I expected to see, and its strength had evidently been much underrated at Munroe. A hill 190 feet high, which rises just in rear of Harrisonburg, has been scarped and fortified. It is situated at an angle of the river, and faces, a long reach of
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
n to the so-called Irish patriot, who is editor of one of the Richmond newspapers. From the summit of Fort Sumter a good general view is obtained of the harbor, and of the fortifications commanding the approach to Charleston. Castle Pinckney and Fort Sumter are two old masonry works built on islands-Pinckney being much closer to the city than Sumter. Between them is Fort Ripley, which mounts — heavy guns. Moultrieville, with its numerous forts, called Battery Bee, Fort Moultrie, Fort Beauregard, &c., is on Sullivan's Island, one mile distant from Fort Sumter. There are excellent arrangements of--, and other contrivances, to foul the screw of a vessel between Sumter and Moultrie. On the other side of Fort Sumter is Fort Johnson, on James Island, Fort Cummins Point, and Fort Wagner, on Morris Island. In fact, both sides of the harbor for several miles appear to bristle with forts mounting heavy guns. The bar, beyond which we counted thirteen blockaders, is nine miles from
man to the Union fleet, was of great importance, opening, as it did, the way for a succession of victories in the interior waters of North Carolina early in the following year. A more formidable expedition, and still greater success soon followed. Early in November, Captain DuPont assembled a fleet of fifty sail, including transports, before Port Royal Sound. Forming a column of nine war-ships with a total of one hundred and twelve guns, the line steamed by the mid-channel between Fort Beauregard to the right, and Fort Walker to the left, the first of twenty and the second of twenty-three guns, each ship delivering its fire as it passed the forts. Turning at the proper point, they again gave broadside after broadside while steaming out, and so repeated their circular movement. The battle was decided when, on the third round, the forts failed to respond to the fire of the ships. When Commander Rodgers carried and planted the Stars and Stripes on the ramparts, he found them utt
xpedition arrived off Port Royal harbor, S. C., last Sunday evening, Nov. 3. The next morning, the Vixen and Mercury, with several gunboats, entered the harbor to take soundings, and were attacked by the rebel battery on Bay Point, known as Fort Beauregard, assisted by five rebel steamers, under command of Commodore Josiah Tatnall. A skirmish ensued, lasting till darkness came on. The following morning, Nov. 5, the whole National fleet went inside, and seven gunboats went up to make a reconnonfavorable, and a council of war decided to wait a little longer. This morning, at nine o'clock, the fleet got under way, and soon after the rebels opened fire. The Wabash gave one broadside to Fort Walker, on Hilton Head, and another to Fort Beauregard, on Bay Point. The rebel navy also opened fire, but kept at a distance from the big guns of the National ships. The Wabash, Susquehanna, and Bienville swept down in line, and delivered their compliments at Hilton Head, in the shape of ten-
rise, this morning, he took possession of Fort Johnston at Leesburg, which was christened by the officers Fort Geary. He then entered the town, with flags flying and bayonets fixed. The rebel troops, who had thought this one of their greatest strongholds, could be discerned through a glass retreating. Gen. Hill, the rebel officer in command, fell back on Middleburg. The command took many prisoners and stores, and are in possession of the bank, post-office, and public buildings. Forts Beauregard and Evans were also taken. The battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, was ended after three days severe fighting, between the Unionists under Gen. Curtis, and the rebels led by Ben. McCulloch. On Thursday, the sixth, the rebels commenced the attack on Gen. Curtis's right wing, assailing and pursuing the rear-guard of a detachment under Gen. Franz Sigel, to the Union main lines on Sugar Creek Hollow, but withdrew and ceased action, at about four o'clock in the afternoon, when the Union r
nged our position. We were called upon to go to the assistance of the Louisiana troops, which we did under a heavy fire. We took our position to the left of Fort Beauregard. May 23.--The firing was confined principally to heavy skirmishing. They have gained some very advantageous positions for artillery. Our confidence is striver; we were then ordered out of the ditches. About four o'clock we took up the line of march, moved to the centre, and took our position in the ditches at Fort Beauregard, to the left of the Jackson road, where we were exposed to a very heavy artillery fire, the first that we have been in in the ditches. May 28.--The enemy hd took our position in the hollow as reserves, in rear of the Third Louisiana, and to the left of the Jackson road, to reenforce, if necessary, what is called Fort Beauregard, which point the enemy are undermining. We made ourselves safe by digging holes in the ground for protection. We hear that three divisions of the Federal ar
nclosed within its defences, attempted an assault. Though bravely and vigorously made, it was nevertheless unsuccessful. He thereupon sat down before the fortifications, to reduce them by the less bloody but sure methods of siege. Pemberton made a gallant defence, hoping for relief from Johnston. Strenuous efforts were made by the chiefs at Richmond to enable Johnston to render that assistance. They detached and sent to him troops from Bragg's army on the frontier of Alabama, and from Beauregard's command in South-Carolina, and in doing this they endangered both those armies. All the capable free men of Mississippi were called to the rescue of the capital of their State, and to save the stronghold of the treasonable Confederacy which was besieged within their limits. Moreover, the besieged post was in the very centre of the slave population of that Confederacy, and the President's proclamation of freedom would be sounded in their hearing if the stronghold should fall. But the e
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
entrance, 120. capture of forts Walker and Beauregard at Port Royal entrance, 121. Landing of Natat Bay Point, Phillip's Island, was named Fort Beauregard, and that on the southern side, near Hilt Beaufort Volunteer Artillery, garrisoned Fort Beauregard,. under the immediate command of Captain s to pass up midway between Forts Walker and Beauregard (which were about two miles apart), receivinr, which was instantly followed by one at Fort Beauregard. The Wabash immediately responded, and wsignalled that the fort was abandoned. Fort Beauregard was also silent and abandoned. The garri they embarked for Savannah. So too at Fort Beauregard the retreat had been hasty. General Drayr safety. Leaving an infernal machine in Fort Beauregard for a murderous purpose, The fair famen were killed in Fort Walker, but none in Fort Beauregard. On the evening succeeding the battle, a the next morning, and took possession of Fort Beauregard. The victory was now complete, and the u[1 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
se tree, in the edge of a wood on the farm of E. B. Willis, about three miles northeast from Vicksburg, and there he issued his orders for assault. Grant ordered the attack to be commenced at two o'clock in the afternoon of the 19th. May, 1863. It was begun by Sherman's corps, which was nearest the works on the northeastern side of the city, which lay on both sides of the old Jackson road, the one on the right, in approaching the town, known as Fort Hill, and the one on the left as Fort Beauregard. The attack was directed upon the former. Blair's division took the lead, followed by Tuttle's as a support. As it moved, it occupied both side of the road. The ground was very rough, and was cleft by deep chasms, in which were trees standing and trees felled; and along the entire front of the Confederate works was such a tangle of hills and obstacles that the approach was excessively difficult and perilous. Grant's Headquarters at Vicksburg. this is a view of the place of Gra
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