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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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ro, upon being released, reiterated his former expression, and an attempt was made to whip him again. But he escaped, jumped into the river and was drowned. The old negro preacher on the plantation where the above occurred, told me that his master cursed de Yankees cause dey made ‘im loss a fifteen-hundred-dollar nigger. In the canal at Columbia were found several boats loaded for Richmond with baled hay and commissary stores, all bearing the stencil mark of C. S. A. Another boat from Lynchburgh arrived during the day. The torch was applied to the boats; bridges across the canal — of which there were several — and a large quantity of medical and commissary goods found in a ware-house, were either burned or thrown into the river. The bank of the canal was cut at several points within five miles, and the locks destroyed. At Columbia the canal crosses the James River in a massive stone aqueduct. No one seems to have known of this structure; at all events nothing was brought along <
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
t, on James island, and at Battery Wagner, where he lost his arm. Returning home he entered Wofford college at Spartanburg, S. C., which he attended but a short time. After farming in Sumter county until 1885, he removed to Darlington county and engaged in farming and merchandising at Doverville, in which business he is still engaged (1898). He served as justice of the peace in Darlington county from 1893 to November, 1897. He was married in January, 1870, to Miss Jane B. Spencer, of Lynchburg, S. C. They have no children, but one adopted daughter, Anna S. Witherspoon, now at Winthrop, S. C., attending school. He is a member of Camp Darlington, No. 785, at Darlington, S. C. James Colwell Cullum James Colwell Cullum was born in Lexington county, S. C., December 3, 1845. He received his education in the schools of his native county, and was attending school at the beginning of the war. He entered the Confederate service in October, 1862, enlisting as a private in Company E, Se