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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
caused the destruction of the most important naval station in the United States. The greatest misfortune to the Union caused by the destruction of the Navy Yard, was the loss of at least twelve hundred fine guns, most of which were uninjured. A number of them were quickly mounted at Sewell's Point to keep our ships from approaching Norfolk; others were sent to Hatteras Inlet, Ocracocke, Roanoke Island and other points in the sounds of North Carolina. Fifty-three of them were mounted at Port Royal, others at Fernandina and at the defences of New Orleans. They were met with at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Island No.10, Memphis, Vicksburg, Grand Gulf and Port Hudson. We found them up the Red River as far as the gunboats penetrated, and took possession of some of them on the cars at Duvall's Bluff, on White River, bound for Little Rock. They gave us a three hours hard fight at Arkansas Post, but in the end they all returned to their rightful owners, many of them indented with Union sh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
ountry will be safe in their hands. The trained officers who are at present in the Navy would be a mere handful in case of a foreign war. They would serve as a nucleus and as instructors to those taken from the commercial marine. The cry of demagogues that the Navy is overburdened with officers, is as shallow as it is false, and should be treated with the contempt such misrepresentations deserve. There was comparatively little opportunity during the year 1861, except at Hatteras and Port Royal, for the Navy to exhibit the zeal, courage and ability which it manifested at a later period. Yet in his report for that year, Mr. Secretary Welles pays the highest tribute of praise to the officers and men of the service. The Honorable Secretary says:--To the patriotic officers of the Navy and the brave men who in various scenes of naval action have served under them, the Department and the Government justly owe an acknowledgement even more earnest and emphatic. Courage, ability, unf
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. Commander Rodghe choice of harbors lay between Bull's Bay, Port Royal, Brunswick and Fernandina. The latter, for d in the opinion of Flag Officer Dupont that Port Royal contained all the required advantages. PoPort Royal is one of the finest harbors in the United States, with water sufficient for the largest veThe bar or shoalest water at the entrance of Port Royal extended ten miles out to sea. All buoys andnd capture of forts Walker and Beauregard at Port Royal entrance by the naval expedition under Flag l affairs in comparison with the defences of Port Royal, and Commodore Stringham's force was comparaght be more difficult places to conquer than Port Royal, but no man could hereafter decline to attac war vessels. From the experience gained at Port Royal there could be no difficulty in estimating h credit for their gallantry in the affair of Port Royal; but for these particulars we must refer the[7 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
es burn saw-mills and other property. Dupont returns to Port Royal. planting batteries on Tybee Island. the Navy take pargainst the enemy. Until the battle of Cape Hatteras and Port Royal occurred, it was not supposed that the Navy would take st had ever been known. These guns, as they were used at Port Royal, gave an example of the manner in which our heavily-armeld to the Dahlgren guns. One result of the victory at Port Royal was our obtaining possession of the famous sea islands, Army had also occupied Beaufort, a pleasant village near Port Royal, where many wealthy land-holders resided during the hot Having done all that was necessary in the vicinity of Port Royal, Flag Officer Dupont turned his attention towards Fernanoats to guard the harbors and inlets, Dupont returned to Port Royal in the Wabash. Dupont found that during his absence from Port Royal, the Army had planted batteries of rifled guns and Columbiads on Tybee Island for the purpose of reducing For
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
hip of the blacks for the Union cause. expeditions to various points. Admiral Dupont consults with Gen. Thomas W. Sherman. a joint expedition. engagement at Port Royal and Seabrook Ferry. Confederates dispersed. effect of co-operation of the Army and Navy. reports of officers of the fleet. expedition of fleet Captain C. Hlly destroyed, though on these occasions the rebels always managed to carry off the guns. Having obtained all the necessary information the vessels returned to Port Royal. Another expedition, under Commander C. R. P. Rodgers, left Tybee Roads on the 11th of December, 1861, with the Ottawa, Pembina, Seneca and Henry Andrew. witzers of the Wabash, to serve as a section of light artillery, under Lieutenant Irwin. The troops and gun-boats engaged the enemy (who was on the alert) at Port Royal and Seabrook Ferries. The Confederates also appeared in force, in line of battle, on the right of the Federal troops, but were dispersed with some loss by the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
tion; both performed their duties in the most admirable manner, and worked together most harmoniously. The casualties among the naval vessels were few in number, which is considered strange when the light character of these steamers is taken into account and the number of guns (56) which were brought to bear upon them by the enemy; but the fire from the eight and nine-inch shell guns and rifles of the fleet was so vigorously kept up and accurately aimed that it was the same old story of Port Royal — hearts of oak in wooden ships. The military forces had some hard fighting on shore, and the attack was conducted with great skill. The entire force of the enemy stationed in the batteries and as sharpshooters was 4,000. Governor H. A. Wise had a force in reserve at Nag's Head, but retreated when he heard of the fate of the two forts. The enemy's troops were well posted and their batteries well masked, so that the Federal forces were really fighting an unseen foe. Over 150 offic
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
d Admiral Dupont. Admiral Dupont retires to Port Royal. combined attack of Army and Navy on Buffin Powhatan and Canandaigua, had to proceed to Port Royal for coal, leaving some lighter vessels to coin the war, and had shown so much ability at Port Royal as to entitle him to the full confidence of F. Dupont, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. President Lincoln was greatly disturbting into Savannah soon after the capture of Port Royal. She had since been closely watched, and fiF. Dupont, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. South Atlantic Squadron, January, 18odgers. United States Steamer Wabash, Port Royal, Nov. 10, 1861. Sir-Although I know that : On Monday, the 4th, this vessel entered Port Royal, and sounded the channel until within three gh. United States Gunboat Curlew, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 17, 1861. Sir-It affords me greof your dispatches announcing the victory at Port Royal, the Department issued the enclosed general [4 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
from the gale of Friday night so badly as not to be able to enter Port Royal until the morning of the 7th. He reached the scene of action abo-Commander C. R. P. Rodgers. United States Steamer Wabash, Port Royal, Nov. 10, 1861. Sir-Although I know that the conduct of the ofCommander Daniel Ammen. United States Gun-Boat Seneca, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir-In obedience to your order of this dat the following report: On Monday, the 4th, this vessel entered Port Royal, and sounded the channel until within three miles of Bay Point, wnant-Commander Watmough. United States Gunboat Curlew, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 17, 1861. Sir-It affords me great pleasure to speak Government and the country for the brilliant success achieved at Port Royal. In the war now raging against the Government in this most causeess. On the receipt of your dispatches announcing the victory at Port Royal, the Department issued the enclosed general order, which, with th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
rasted. Boynton's criticisms, etc. Rear-Admiral Dahlgren succeeded Rear-Admiral DuPont, at Port Royal, on July 4th, 1863, the latter having been relieved at his own request, owing to a difference as any in the Navy, at home and abroad, for skill and bravery. The attack upon and capture of Port Royal had given DuPont a foreign reputation in addition to that he bore at home, and European office with the long-drawn-out battle at Alexandria against forts only a trifle superior to those at Port Royal. and the palm will be given to the American squadron as an exhibition of skill. That affair would only entail a loss of men and material, if not a loss of naval prestige. The victory at Port Royal had settled the question of the future usefulness of Charleston and Savannah to the Confederats effectually as if we had actual possession of them, which we now know fully. The capture of Port Royal included in its direct consequences all that was essential to the occupation of adjacent place
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
n Charleston harbor than to depend on the Monitors alone. The New Ironsides was off Charleston bar, two Monitors were at Edisto, one at Stono River, three at Port-Royal, and one at Ossabaw. General Gillmore having arrived. arrangements were immediately made between him and Rear-Admiral Dahlgren for a descent on Morris Island,d of operations. But as this expedition only required the presence of the Navy while the troops were disembarking, Rear-Admiral Dahlgren soon after returned to Port Royal, leaving a sufficient force of gun-boats in the St. John's River to co-operate with the Army if necessary. The Confederates were not slow to take advantage o next day, the Sonoma, Commander George H. Cooper, and Nipsic, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson, were sent as outside cruisers to cover the blockade south of Port Royal, where it was weakest, and where the chief effort was to be made. A plan was laid between General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to make a diversion by cutting
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