Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) or search for Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 4 document sections:

William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
gned to reach the sea-coast first at Savannah or Port Royal, South Carolina, and even kept in mind the alternative of Pensacof which we found General Foster. He had just come from Port Royal, expecting to find Admiral Dahlgren in Ossabaw Sound, anfind vessels of light draught to carry our supplies from Port Royal to Cheeves's Mill, or to King's Bridge above, whence thefficult work. General Foster then concluded to go on to Port Royal, to send back to us six hundred thousand rations, and alur enemy of them. All these animals I will have sent to Port Royal, or collected behind Fort McAllister, to be used by Genethreaten the State of Georgia than from the direction of Port Royal. Besides, I would much prefer not to detach from my reghe James River as soon as General Easton (who is gone to Port Royal for that purpose) reports to me that he has an approxima the negroes, prisoners of war, sick, etc., en route for Port Royal. In relation to Savannah, you will remark that General
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
He will retain possession of all cotton here, and ship it as fast as vessels can be had to New York. I shall immediately send the Seventeenth Corps over to Port Royal, by boats, to be furnished by Admiral Dahlgren and General Foster (without interfering with General Easton's vessels), to make a lodgment on the railroad at Poc there was danger of national bankruptcy, and he appealed to me, as a soldier and patriot, to hurry up matters so as to bring the war to a close. He left for Port Royal about the 15th of January, and promised to go North without delay, so as to hurry back to me the supplies I had called for, as indispensable for the prosecutiond to carry with him clothing and furniture for the use of himself, his family, and servants, and will be transported within the enemy's lines, but not by way of Port Royal. These rules will apply to all parties, and from them no exception will be made. I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant, W. T. Sherman, M
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
cess than I anticipated, for it seems that the rebs conceived Stono to be a feint, and the real object at Bull's Bay, supposing, from the number of steamers and boats, that we had several thousand men. Now came an aide from General Gillmore, at Port Royal, with your cipher-dispatch from Midway, so I steamed down to Port Royal to see him. Next day was spent in vain efforts to decipher — finally it was accomplished. You thought that the state of the roads might force you to turn upon Charleston; Port Royal to see him. Next day was spent in vain efforts to decipher — finally it was accomplished. You thought that the state of the roads might force you to turn upon Charleston; so I went there on the 15th, but there was no sign yet of flinching. Then I went to Bull's Bay next day (16th), and found that the troops were not yet ashore, owing to the difficulties of shoal water. One of the gunboats had contrived to get up to within shelling range, and both soldiers and sailors were working hard. On the evening of the 16th I steamed down to Stono to see how matters were going there. Passing Charleston, I noticed two large fires, well inside — probably preparing to leave<
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
ed by General Schofield, and the right and left wings were ordered to march under their respective commanding generals North by easy stages to Richmond, Virginia, there to await my return from the South. On the 29th of April, with a part of my personal staff, I proceeded by rail to Wilmington, North Carolina, where I found Generals Hawley and Potter, and the little steamer Russia, Captain Smith, awaiting me. After a short pause in Wilmington, we embarked, and proceeded down the coast to Port Royal and the Savannah River, which we reached on the 1st of May. There Captain Hosea, who had just come from General Wilson at Macon, met us, bearing letters for me and General Grant, in which General Wilson gave a brief summary of his operations up to date. Ie had marched from Eastport, Mississippi, five hundred miles in thirty days, took six thousand three hundred prisoners, twenty-three colors, and one hundred and fifty-six guns, defeating Forrest, scattering the militia, and destroying ev