Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) or search for Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
on the islands surrounding it. War seemed inevitable, and the whole State, as one man, was firmly resolved to meet it. The legislature had passed a bill on December 17th providing for the organization of ten regiments for the defense of the State, and the convention had ordered the formation of a regiment for six months service, to be embodied at once, the governor to appoint the field officers. This last was Gregg's First regiment, which was organized in January, 1861 , and on duty on Sullivan's and Morris islands by the 1st of February following. The governor appointed Maxcy Gregg, of Columbia, colonel; Col. A. H. Gladden, who had been an officer of the Palmetto regiment in the Mexican war, lieutenantcol-onel; and D. H. Hamilton, the late marshal of the United States court in South Carolina, major. On March 6, 1861 , the adjutant-general of the State reported to Gen. M. L. Bonham, whom the governor had commissioned major-general, to command the division formed. under the act o
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ted to a greater test of the depth and strength of their sentiments, or put to a severer trial of their patriotism, than were the planters and their families, who abandoned their houses and estates along the coast of South Carolina, and retired as refugees into the interior, all the men who were able entering the army. At the time of the fall of Forts Walker and Beauregard, Charleston harbor was defended by Forts Moultrie and Sumter, Castle Pinckney and Fort Johnson, and by batteries on Sullivan's and Morris islands. All these were to be strengthened, and the harbor made secure against any attack in front. To prevent the occupation of James island, the mouth of Stono river was defended by forts built on Cole's and Battery islands, and a line of defensive works built across the island. No attempt had been made to erect forts or batteries in defense of the inlets of Worth or South Edisto, but the harbor of Georgetown was protected by works unfinished on Cat and South islands, for t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
and fall of 1860 roused the military spirit of the people, and the First regiment of Rifles was organized in Charleston, of which Lieutenant Capers was unanimously elected major. He served with this regiment at Castle Pinckney, and on Morris, Sullivan's, James and John's islands. His regiment also constituted a part of the army under Beauregard during the attack on Fort Sumter. He continued to serve in the vicinity of Charleston until November, when he resigned the rank of lieutenant-colonel any of the famous battles. He was a member of the convention of 1860 which determined upon the secession of the State, and then became colonel of the First North Carolina regiment, enlisted for six months service, with which he was on duty on Sullivan's and Morris islands during the reduction of Fort Sumter, and afterward in Virginia. Previous to the battle of Manassas he was stationed at Centreville, and then near Fairfax Court House, and commanded the infantry in the action at Vienna. At t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
the morning the vessel was fired on. He served on Morris and Sullivan's islands until after the fall of Fort Sumter and then enlised in CompaFort Pulaski and Tybee islands, at Port Royal, at Charleston, and Sullivan's and James' islands, at Wilmington, N. C., on Masonboro sound, andafter the fall of Fort Sumter, serving as a riding vidette on Sullivan's Island at the firing of the first gun, and was one of twelve men whony which he had organized, and with this command he served on Sullivan's Island. In June, 1861, his company having become a part of the Fiftumerous engagements, notably before Savannah and on James and Sullivan's islands, and after the close of hostilities he resumed the affairs ofn appointed quartermaster of the Twentieth regiment and served at Sullivan's and Morris islands until 1864, when the command was ordered to ViPomcotaligo, Morris Island, Battery Wagner, Battery Marshall (Sullivan's Island), Fort Johnson (James Island), Olustee, Fla., Walthall Juncti