hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 70 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 48 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 14 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) or search for Sumterville (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 9 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Washington on the Eve of the War. (search)
ted in their organization. Those volunteers were citizens of the Federal District, and therefore had not at the time, nor have they ever had since the powerful stimulant of State feeling, nor the powerful support of a State government, a State's pride, a State press to set forth and make much of their services. They did their duty quietly, and they did it well and faithfully. Although not mustered into the service and placed on pay until after the fatal day when the flag was fired upon at Sumter, yet they rendered great service before that time in giving confidence to the Union men, to members of the national legislature, and also to the President in the knowledge that there was at least a small force at its disposition ready to respond at any moment to his call. It should also be remembered of them, that the first troops mustered into the service were sixteen companies of these volunteers; and that, during the dark days when Washington was cut off from communication with the North
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., From Moultrie to Sumter. (search)
ent at the bombardment, was absent when the photograph was taken. Lieutenant Talbot had been sent to Washington, and had returned with a message from President Lincoln announcing to Governor Pickens that the Government would attempt to provision Sumter; he was not permitted to rejoin Anderson. The picture, though dim, has the value of a fac-simile. came. The Secretary of War would not let us have a man in the way of reenforcement, the plea being that reenforcements would irritate the people. rson would not allow us to return the fire, so the transport turned about and steamed seaward. Anderson asked for an explanation of the firing from Governor Pickens, and announced that he would allow no vessel to pass within range of the guns of Sumter if the answer was unsatisfactory. Governor Pickens replied that he would renew the firing under like circumstances. I think Major Anderson had received an intimation that the Star of the West was coming, but did not believe it. He thought Gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Inside Sumter: in 1861. (search)
Inside Sumter: in 1861. James Chester, Captain Third Artillery, U. S. A. Toward the close of , except that some soldiers must have got into Sumter. But they blew their alarm-whistle all the san condition than it would to mount the guns of Sumter. On the parade were quantities of flag-sto open on them at this time, the bombardment of Sumter would have had a very different termination. icy and instructions. The heaviest guns in Sumter were three ten-inch columbiads-considered verywithin range. Although the full armament of Sumter was not on hand, there were many more guns tha Fortunately, we had officers of experience in Sumter, and fortunately, too, we had very few instrumGeneral Beauregard would open his batteries on Sumter. The men waited about for some time in expe embrasures were thus closed was not known in Sumter till after the bombardment. It explained whatan accident. There was no special distress in Sumter, and no signal to that effect was intended. [6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
ery on Morris Island, manned by South Carolina troops; the other just before the bombardment of Sumter, April 12th. The feeling of the Confederate authorities was that a peaceful issue would finallyr the firing of the gun, and laid on its oars, about one-third the distance between the fort and Sumter, there to witness the firing of the first gun of the war between the States. It was fired from nderson and his gallant garrison; this feeling was shown by cheers whenever a gun was fired from Sumter. It was shown also by loud reflections on the men-of-war outside the harbor. These vessels, t he had done his duty as a soldier holding a most delicate trust. This first bombardment of Sumter was but its baptism of fire. During subsequent attacks by land and water, it was battered by th from Secretary Stanton, the same flag that was lowered, April 14th, 1861, was raised again over Sumter, by Major (then General) Anderson, on April 14th, 1865, the day President Lincoln was shot. Of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes on the surrender of Fort Sumter. (search)
should not have surrendered when he did. The fire only consumed the officers' and men's quarters; the two magazines were uninjured, only one man had been wounded, the walls were secure, and he still had provisions which would have sustained his small command until the fleet could both have provisioned and reinforced him. I was present with Captain Hartstene during the evacuation, and was astonished to see barrels of pork Captain J. G. Foster in his report says that the supply of bread in Sumter failed April 10th, and that the last of the damaged rice was served at breakfast on the 13th. The want of provisions, he adds, would soon have caused the surrender of the fort, but with plenty of cartridges [referring to the lack of material for cartridge-bags] the men would have cheerfully fought five or six days, and, if necessary, much longer, on pork alone, of which we had a sufficient supply.--editors. being rolled out and shipped on board the Isabel, the steamer furnished by General B
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., War preparations in the North. (search)
and the teacher's pulpit. The windy, cheerless night was a long one, but gave place at last to a fickle, changeable day of drifting showers and occasional sunshine, and we were roused by our first reveille in camp.. A breakfast was made from some cooked provisions brought with us, and we resumed the duty of organizing and instructing the camp. With the vigorous outdoor life and the full physical and mental employment, the depression which had weighed upon me since the news of the guns at Sumter passed away, never to return. New battalions arrived from day to day, the cantonments were built by themselves, like the first, and the business of instruction and drill was systematized. The men were not yet armed, so there was no temptation to begin too soon with the manual of the musket, and they were kept industriously employed in marching in single line, by file, in changing direction, in forming column of fours from double line, etc., before their guns were put into their hands.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
coln, March 4th, the secession movement had spread through the cottonbelt and delegates from the secession States had met as a congress at Montgomery, Alabama, February 4th. On the 8th they had organized the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of Simon Cameron, Secretary of War from March 4, 1861, until Jan. 15, 1862. from a photograph. America, and on the 9th had elected Jefferson Davis President and Alexander H. Stephens Vice-President. When the news of the firing upon Sumter reached Washington, President Lincoln prepared a proclamation, and issued it April 15th, convening Congress and calling forth 75,000 three-months militia to suppress combinations against the Government. The Federal situation was alarming. Sumter fell on the 13th of April, and was evacuated on the 14th. Virginia seceded on the 17th, and seized Harper's Ferry on the 18th and the Norfolk Navy Yard on the 20th. On the 19th a mob in Baltimore assaulted the 6th Massachusetts volunteers as it p
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Wilson's Creek, and the death of Lyon. (search)
0 were ill-armed and undisciplined Home Guards. The organized troops were in all 5868, in four brigades. By the 9th. of August these were reduced to an aggregate of about 5300 men, with the 500 Home Guards additional. Of these troops, the 1st Iowa regiment was entitled to discharge on the 14th of August, and the 3d and 5th Missouri, Sigel's and Salomon's, at different periods, by companies, from the 9th to the 18th of August. All except the regulars had been enrolled since the attack on Sumter in April, and but little time had been possible for drill and instruction. They had been moved and marched from St. Louis and points in Kansas, taking part in Cavalryman of the United States regulars. In 1861. several spirited but minor engagements, and were ill-provided with clothing and food, but their spirits were undaunted, and they were devoted to their leader. The latter part of July was spent by Lyon in drilling his troops and procuring supplies, the mills in the neighborhood
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
reeze and a smooth sea. Several others of the small steamers with the Seneca were following in the wake of the flag-ship. In obedience to signal, I went on board that vessel, and received orders to be delivered to Captain Lardner of the Susquehanna, the senior officer blockading Charleston, distant about thirty miles. These directed certain vessels to rendezvous off Port Royal entrance, but not to leave the line of blockade until after nightfall. No sooner was the Seneca fairly in sight of Sumter than the signal guns were fired, to announce the arrival of the avant-courier of the fleet that they knew was intended for the attack of Port Royal. After passing Bull's Bay, I had the belief that we were bound for Port Royal, but no actual knowledge of the fact until going on board of the Wabash, as my orders were marked Confidential — not to be opened unless separated from the flag-ship. At the very time we were weathering the gale, the following telegram was sent: Richmond, Nov. 1, ‘61.