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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 12 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Thompson (South Dakota, United States) or search for Fort Thompson (South Dakota, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
, had been much strengthened by Jeff. Thompson, See page 58. who had occupied it for some time, and had strong military works there, one of which was called Fort Thompson. This was an irregular bastioned work, mounting fourteen heavy guns, and situated about half a mile below New Madrid. There was another similar, but smalle62. and at dawn the next morning (thirty-five hours after they left Bird's Point, on the Cairo and Fulton Railway) they were in position, within half a mile of Fort Thompson. These guns were carried twenty miles by railway, and dragged on trucks (such as is delineated in the engraving) twenty miles farther, over a miry road mostred with information that the place was abandoned. When the fact was certified, Hamilton sent Captain Mower and his artillerists to plant the national flag on Fort Thompson. At almost the same hour, March 14, 1862. Commodore Foote left Cairo with a powerful fleet, composed of seven armored gun-boats, one not armored, and ten mor
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
a mile, and terminating in a two-gun redoubt. On the river-bank and covering their left was Fort Thompson, four miles from New Berne, armed with thirteen heavy guns; and other works and appliances, ense of the river-channel against the passage of gun-boats, were numerous. A little below Fort Thompson was Fort Dixie, four guns. Between Fort Thompson and the city were Forts Brown, Ellis, and Fort Thompson and the city were Forts Brown, Ellis, and Lane, each mounting eight guns ; and a mile from New Berne was Union Point Battery, of two guns, manned by a company of public singers. In the channel of the Neuse were twenty-four sunken vessels, ssoon dissipated. Foster, with the first brigade, marched up the main country road to attack Fort Thompson and the Confederate left. Reno, with the second brigade, followed nearer the line of the ra The National squadron, in the mean time, had co-operated with the army in the attack on Fort Thompson, and in driving the Confederates from the other batteries on the shore. When these were O