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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 12 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fort Thompson (South Dakota, United States) or search for Fort Thompson (South Dakota, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Madrid, siege of (search)
miles above it, almost 1,000 miles above New Orleans by the river channel, constituted the key to the navigation of the lower Mississippi, in the early part of the Civil War, and consequently were of great importance to the large commercial city towards its mouth. To this place Confederate General Polk transferred what he could of munitions of war when he evacuated Columbus. Gen. Jeff. M. Thompson was in command at Fort Madrid of a considerable force and a strong fortification called Fort Thompson. When the garrison there was reinforced from Columbus, it was put under the command of General McCown. Against this post General Halleck despatched Gen. John Pope and a considerable body of troops, chiefly from Ohio and Illinois. He departed from St. Louis (Feb. 22, 1862) on transports, and landed first at Commerce, Mo., and marched thence to New Madrid, encountering a small force under General Thompson on the way, and capturing from him three pieces of artillery. He reached the vici
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Newbern, capture of (search)
alry, with three batteries of field-artillery of six guns each. These occupied a line of intrenchments extending more than a mile, supported by an immense line of rifle-pits and detached works. On the river-bank. 4 miles below Newbern, was Fort Thompson, armed with thirteen heavy guns. The Nationals made the attack at 8 A. M. on the 14th. Foster's brigade bore the brunt of the battle for about four hours. General Parke supported him until it was evident that Foster could sustain himself, w pursued by Foster to the verge of the Trent. The Confederates burned the railroad and turnpike bridges over that stream behind them (the former by sending a blazing raft against it) and escaped. The gunboats had compelled the evacuation of Fort Thompson. Large numbers of the inhabitants of Newbern fled from the town. Foster's troops took possession of the place, and the general was appointed military governor of Newbern. The Nationals lost 100 killed and 498 wounded. The Confederate loss