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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
No. 11. report of Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations May 1-July 27, 1864. Hdqrs. Department and Army of the Tennessee, September 18, 1864. General: Having been assigned by the President of the United States, I assumed command of the Fourth Army Corps April 10, 1864. One division, Major-General Stanley's, was stationed, two brigades at Blue Springs, and one at Ooltewah; the Second Division, then under command of Brigadier-General Wagner, was at Loudon, and the Third Division, General Wood's, was still in the Department of the Ohio, near Knoxville. My first duty was to concentrate the corps near Cleveland. This was effected by the 25th of April. About one week's time was given to refit and prepare for the field. A portion of the command had just completed a trying winter campaign in East Tennessee, and was quite badly off in many respects, from shortness of transportation, clothing, and other supplies. The animals, in Ge
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
No. 14. report of Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-July 26. Hdqrs. Firt Division, Fourth Army Corps, 1864. I have the honor to state that at 12 m. on the 3d day of May the First Division, under my command, marched from its camp at Blue Springs, under orders to move to Catoosa Springs. The division took the main road to Dalton, and encamped the same night one mile south of Red Clay. Marching early the next morning, we reached Catoosa Springs at noon, near Dr. Lee's house. General McCook's cavalry, which was in advance of the infantry, exchanged shots with the rebel pickets, who ran away in the direction of Tunnel Hill. We remained in camp the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the?th marched for Tunnel Hill, this division leading. After passing Dr. Lee's house the main road leading down the base of Rocky Face was taken. Skirmishers were deployed, and the enemy's skirmishers were soon encountered. We found the ro
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
ty-first Kentucky, Colonel Price; Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Champion; Fortieth Ohio, Colonel Taylor; One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore; Fifty-first Ohio, Colonel Mc-Clain; Ninety-ninth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cummins commanding; Eighty-fourth Indiana, Col. A. J. Neff, and Thirty-fifth Indiana. Major Dufficy commanding, and the Fifth Indiana Battery, Lieut. A. Morrison commanding, numbering 155 commissioned officers and 2,875 enlisted men, making a total of 3,028-left Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., en route for Atlanta, Ga. On the evening of the 4th we reached Catoosa Springs, where we remained until the 7th, on which day we advanced on Tunnel Hill, the First Brigade of the division having the advance; it meeting with opposition near Tunnel Hill, my brigade was detailed to act on the left next to Rocky Face. The Twenty-first Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers, supported by the brigade, formed in two lines. We drove the enemy, composed of Wheeler's cavalry
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
ty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Waters; Eightieth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Kilgour; N inth Indiana, Colonel Suman; Thirty-sixth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Carey; Thirtieth Indiana, Captain Dawson; Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, Capt. J. J. Lawson, to which was attached Batltry B, Pennsylvania. Effective force, officers and men, about 2,900. By orders from Major-General Stanley, division commander, we marched with the balance of his command on the 3d day of May, 1864, from our camp at Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., to Red Clay, on the Georgia line, and camped for the night. May 4, marched with the division to Catoosa Springs, Ga. (with light skirmishing), for concentration with the army, where we rested until May 7, when we marched with the corps, drove the enemy from and took possession of Tunnel Hill, Ga. For several succeeding days we advanced upon and ineffectually endeavored to drive the enemy from Rocky Face Ridge in our front. My position was on the left of the rail
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
No. 31. report of Col. Thomas E. Rose, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry. Hdqrs. 77TH Regt. Pennsylvania Vet. Vol. Infty., In Camp, near Atlanta, Ga., September 14, 1864. Captain : The following is the report of the operations of my regiment during the campaign commencing on the 5th of May, 1864, and ending on the 8th of September, 1864: On the 3d of May, 1864, the regiment broke camp at Blue Springs, at 12 m., and moved out six miles to the Knoxville and Dalton Railroad, and encamped for the night. On Wednesday, May 4, we marched at 5 a. m. to Catoosa Springs, where we encamped for two days. On Saturday, May 7, marched south to Tunnel Hill. On Sunday, May 8, moved to Mill Creek Gap and Rocky Face Ridge. On Monday, May 9, near midnight, the regiment went on picket. On Tuesday, May 10, skirmished all day with the enemy; had 3 enlisted men wounded. On Wednesday, May 11, the regiment, with the Thirtieth Indiana, moved on to a ridge which commanded Mill Creek G
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
al Schofield, with three divisions of the Twenty-third Army Corps, arrived at Cleveland, Tenn., from Charleston at 10.30 a. m.; the head of his column arrived at 10 a. m. He passed through Cleveland, and camped for the night in the vicinity of Blue Springs. Being ordered to start from Cleveland upon the arrival of General Schofield, the Third Division, Fourth Corps, left Widow Tucker's at 12 m., the Second Division left Cleveland, and the First left Blue Springs at the same hour. General CruftBlue Springs at the same hour. General Cruft's brigade (First Brigade, First Division), being posted at Ooltewah, marched at 12 m. to join the Third Division and to march with it to Catoosa Springs, where it would join General Stanley's command. It camped this evening with General Wood. The Third Division marched to the intersection of the old Alabama road with the road that runs from Red Clay to Ooltewah, and there camped for the night. Made headquarters of the corps with this division. Along this route the roads in very good conditi
gaged in their treasonable work of stealing and destroying the property of the people, and carrying off cattle fattening for the army. With two hundred men, Colonel Lee pursued and drove him to Loudon, and captured fifty prisoners, among them two Yankee recruiting officers, and about seventy-five fine beef cattle.--Richmond Whig, October 10. A large and enthusiastic meeting of mechanics was held in Richmond, Va., at which the following resolution, among others, was adopted: Resolved, That, awakened to a sense of the abject posture to which labor and we who labor have been reduced, and to the privileges which as citizens and people the institutions of our country rest in us, we will not sleep again until our grasp has firmly clenched the rights and immunities which are ours as Americans and men, until our just demands have been met by the concessions of all opposing elements. The National forces under General Burnside defeated the rebels at Blue Springs, Tenn.--(Doc. 192.)
de's report. Knoxville, Tennessee, October 17, 1863. Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: On the eighth instant the enemy held down as far as Blue Springs, and a cavalry brigade of ours held Bull's Gap, supported by a small body of infantry at Morristown. I accordingly despatched a brigade of cavalry around by Rpt the enemy's retreat, and with a considerable force of infantry and artillery moved to Bull's Gap. On Saturday, the tenth, I advanced a cavalry brigade to Blue Springs, where they found the enemy strongly posted and offered a stubborn resistance. The skirmishing continued till the arrival of the infantry at about five o'clocat that place and five other bridges, and destroying three locomotives and about thirty-five cars. His advance is now ten miles beyond Bristol. Our loss at Blue Springs and in the pursuit was about one hundred killed and wounded. That of the enemy was considerably greater. About one hundred and fifty prisoners were taken. A.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Knoxville. (search)
on of cavalry in the extreme advance reached Cleveland, and the prospect for a junction was good until Chickamauga put an end to further movements in that direction, and Sweetwater became our outpost. Early in October a force of the enemy under General John S. Williams, coming from the eastward, moved down the railroad to the vicinity of Bull's Gap, and pressed heavily upon our forces in that quarter. With such troops as could readily be concentrated, General Burnside attacked them at Blue Springs on the 10th and drove them well back toward Bristol. On the 22d of October our outpost at Sweetwater and our reserve at Philadelphia were attacked successfully. Subsequent operations and reconnoissances resulted in the determination to abandon temporarily the Valley of the Tennessee south of Loudon. The troops were all withdrawn and the pontoon-bridge was transferred from London to Knoxville, where General Sanders's cavalry command crossed it to the south side of the river, on the 1s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
e town, and by superior numbers compelled the withdrawal of Colonel Carter's force. In the latter part of September, 1863, Brigadier-General John S. Williams assumed command of the Confederate forces in east Tennessee and advanced as far as Blue Springs. Burnside's forces occupied Bull's Gap, nine miles in front. Williams was ordered not to give up an inch of ground until driven from it. He had only about seventeen hundred effective men, with two batteries of artillery. Brigadier-General dred men, mostly recruits, was at Greenville. There was no other support within nearly one hundred miles. To maintain his ground against a force so largely superior, General Williams took a strong position on a ridge crossing the road east of Blue Springs. By multiplying camp-fires and beating drums he made an exhibition of force he did not possess. But this ruse de guerre did not hold the enemy in check. On the 10th of October they advanced in force and attacked General Williams's position.
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