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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Blue Springs (Tennessee, United States) or search for Blue Springs (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
more to the eastward, so as to bar at Rheatown the retreat of the enemy. On the morning of the 10th the infantry by feints detained the latter in front of the Blue Springs pass. Finally, at five o'clock in the afternoon, Burnside, believing that Foster had accomplished his movement, caused Jones' position to be attacked by Ferre able to attempt to hold him. He left about a hundred and fifty prisoners in the hands of the Federals, who themselves had lost something like a hundred men at Blue Springs and nearly twenty at Henderson's Mill. Foster's guilty neglect had saved Williams. Burnside urged his infantry no farther. But Shackelford closely pursued Wox by several mountain-ranges, has not escaped the attention of the Southerners, who are burning to wreak vengeance upon Garrard for the repulse experienced at Blue Springs. General W. E. Jones and Colonel Giltner, successor to Williams, are designated to wreak this vengeance. Their two brigades together make up about two thousan