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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 150 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 49 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 26 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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cClellan. headquarters army of the Potomac, Bolivar, Sept. 15-10 A. M. To H. W. Halleck, General-ess of the attacking force doubly hazardous. Bolivar, a village boasting of six or eight dwellingshing off from the turnpike at the right, near Bolivar, and proceeded to the foot of the mountains. the village, our entire force was mustered on Bolivar preparatory to stacking arms and delivering orning, and should they attempt to move toward Bolivar, will follow to that place. Gen. Hurlbut ittack was to take the direction of Jackson or Bolivar, via Bethel, were so rife, and the fortificateadquarters Third Iowa infantry, camp near Bolivar, Tenn., October 8, 1862. Capt. H. Scofield, Assiseadquarters at Corinth. Gen. Ord returned to Bolivar, and Gen. Grant to Jackson, Tennessee. Gen. Rthem all the geographical data they require — Bolivar and Jackson being kept in view as adjuncts ofe east of the railroad, moving sternly up the Bolivar road in column by divisions. Directly it ope[9 more...]
to press their retreat to the utmost. George B. McClellan. headquarters army of the Potomac, Bolivar, Sept. 15-10 A. M. To H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: Information this moment received, comn to the party in possession, and making the progress of the attacking force doubly hazardous. Bolivar, a village boasting of six or eight dwellings, is situated on the main road, between Middletown and the Gap, and about one and a half miles from the latter place. At Bolivar, a road branches off from each side of the main road, the two roads taking a circuitous course to the mountains, and gras first formed, was on a piece of rising ground on the right and left of the main road between Bolivar and the mountains. As the day advanced and our forces moved forward, the position was changed,to reenforce Reno. The column took the road branching off from the turnpike at the right, near Bolivar, and proceeded to the foot of the mountains. All along the line the utmost enthusiasm was mani
at which any Northern beggar would consider an insult to have offered him, and in his general appearance was in no respect to be distinguished from the mongrel, bare-footed crew who follow his fortunes. I had heard much of the decayed appearance of the rebel soldiers, but such a looking crowd! Ireland in her worst straits could present no parallel, and yet they glory in their shame. The force surrendered. As soon as Jackson returned from the village, our entire force was mustered on Bolivar preparatory to stacking arms and delivering over generally. They comprised the following: Twelfth N. Y. State Militia, from New-York,600 Thirty-ninth New-York,530 One Hundred and Eleventh New-York--raw troops,1,000 One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York--raw troops,1,000 One Hundred and Twenty-fifth New-York--raw troops,976 One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New-York--raw troops,1,000 Thirty-second Ohio,650 Sixtieth Ohio,800 Eighty-seventh Ohio--three months regiment,850 Ninth Vermont,80
ies and the impetuous attacks of Jackson's men rendered their intrenchments on Bolivar Heights too warm for the enemy, and late in the evening they fell back to Camp Hill, one mile in the rear of the Bolivar fortifications. Here they had their heavy guns planted and strong intrenchments thrown up, but within easy range of the batteries of McLaws and Anderson on the opposite heights. Night coming on, the struggle ceased, Jackson's forces occupying the deserted intrenchments on the hills of Bolivar. That night old Stonewall sent a message to Gen. Walker that his forces were in possession of the enemy's first line of intrenchments, and that with God's blessing, he would have Harper's Ferry and the Federal forces early next morning. At daylight the next morning, (Monday,) the fight was renewed, the enemy still offering an obstinate resistance, until about seven o'clock A. M., when their colors were struck and a capitulation proposed. Of the terms of this capitulation we have learne
sued the retreating enemy this morning, and should they attempt to move toward Bolivar, will follow to that place. Gen. Hurlbut is at the Hatchie River, with five or vice versa. Rumors that the attack was to take the direction of Jackson or Bolivar, via Bethel, were so rife, and the fortifications of Corinth were so well know the south about four o'clock this afternoon; our infantry, which started from Bolivar at three o'clock A. M. yesterday, marching twenty-nine miles, and to-day fightColonel Trumbull's report. headquarters Third Iowa infantry, camp near Bolivar, Tenn., October 8, 1862. Capt. H. Scofield, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: I he death of the First Lieutenant, all through the battle, and until we reached Bolivar, though suffering from a painful but not a severe wound. Lieuts. McMurtrie anisting and repelling the onslaught of the rebel hosts at Corinth, another from Bolivar, under Major-General Hurlbut, was marching upon the enemy's rear, driving in t
rtook the forces of Price again at Hickory Flats, about eighteen miles from this place, thence to this point, the enemy having stopped at Ripley. I have omitted in the proper place to mention the fine cavalry force under Col. Jackson, belonging to Lovell's division. They performed every duty assigned them with promptness and energy, and deserve a place in the page when the history of the fight is written. Of the loss of our gallant little army, I am unable to speak positively. The loss in Gen. Lovell's division, killed and wounded, is three hundred and eighty. Men never fought more gallantly, nor more willingly, and I am pleased to say that as far as my observation extends, old prejudices among them have been effaced. Holly Springs, Tuesday, October 14. Two thousand one hundred of Rosecrans's wounded have arrived at Jackson, Tenn., and one thousand one hundred at Bolivar. A large number still at Corinth. Nearly all their dead buried by us were breast-plated. ramrod.
Doc. 195.-fight near Bolivar, Tenn. Colonel Crocker's report. headquarters Second division, District of Jackson, Bolivar, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of SBolivar, Tenn., August 30, 1862. Captain A. K. Ryan, A. D.C. and Chief of Staff: Colonel Leggett, commanding first brigade, was sent out by me this morning on the Grand Junction road with one regiment of his brigade, four companies of the Second Illinois cavalry, commandeer, Colonel Thirteenth Iowa Volunteers, Commhanding Second Division, District of Jackson, at Bolivar, Tenn. Report of Colonel Leggett. headquarters First brigade, Bolivar, Tenn., September 1,Bolivar, Tenn., September 1, 1862. Colonel M. M. Crocker, Commanding Post: I have the honor to report, that about seven o'clock A. M., of August thirtieth, I received from you, orders to take a portion of my command, one sectnfantry deployed in a piece of woodland on the Van Buren road, about five and a half miles from Bolivar, and briskly skirmishing with the enemy. I immediately discovered that we had been deceived as
y-first of August I received a dispatch from Col. M. M. Crocker, commanding at Bolivar, that that post was threatened by a large force, advancing from the south, andhad been asked for and sent forward. Feeling that an attack was being made on Bolivar, I took the first train to that place. On arriving I ascertained that a severe skirmish had taken place four miles south of Bolivar, between the forces under Col. Leggett, consisting of the Twentieth and Seventy-eighth regiments of Ohio voluormed the telegraph-wires were cut and railroad bridges fired between here and Bolivar, and that four companies of the Forty-fifth Illinois volunteers at Medon, unden the vicinity of Medon Station: Immediately after the repulse of the enemy at Bolivar, large bodies of his cavalry attacked the different detachments stationed alonng a number of prisoners. As soon as I was informed of the demonstration on Bolivar, I ordered the force stationed at Estaualya, under command of Col. Dennis, of