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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 150 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 49 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 26 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
hich they could have indefinitely defended with ease. Ford tried in vain to recapture it; his soldiers were unable to climb the acclivities, which their comrades had descended so rapidly, under the enemy's fire. He nevertheless remained in possession of Maryland Heights, while his adversaries, not profiting by the advantage thus acquired, suffered the rest of the day to pass without seriously molesting him. McLaws was unwilling to advance too far without being sure that Jackson was before Bolivar. It was well he acted thus; for during the night he was informed by Lee of McClellan's march, and received orders to dispute the mountain passes with the Federals. He therefore sent Cobb with a large portion of his forces to Crampton's Gap, where we have seen him contending with Franklin on the 14th, and he remained in person to watch Harper's Ferry with but the number of troops strictly necessary to occupy the heights he had so easily carried the day before. Meanwhile, by a strange coin
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
ackson to Grand Junction, near the village of Bolivar. Abandoning Grand Junction, the Federals hng altogether to about eight thousand men, at Bolivar, and his left, formed by the army of Rosecranit could easily be conveyed by rail either to Bolivar or Corinth. The extreme left of Rosecrans ex to receive him, made a detour to the west of Bolivar, and crossed the Hatchie lower down, in orderdoned all intention of attacking his right at Bolivar, and that his efforts would be directed againeady made a demonstration in the direction of Bolivar. The two Confederate generals needed, first battle of the 16th. Entertaining fears for Bolivar as well as Corinth, he had divided the main bin Corinth had thrown up a new redoubt on the Bolivar road, which was called Fort Richardson; in sh track of the Jackson Railway it followed the Bolivar road; this road ascended a gentle acclivity, just as the battle was closing. Finding the Bolivar road, upon which he was marching, occupied by[5 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
ing again the great river at Columbus. In order to defend this long railway track, all the secondary lines would have been abandoned, as well as the stations of Bolivar, Jackson in Tennessee, Iuka, and even the fortifications of Corinth, whose works would have been destroyed, and the depots evacuated. Halleck did not approve of ber, Grant had put five divisions in motion, which swelled the number of his active forces to more than thirty thousand men. Three of these divisions started from Bolivar, the other two came from Corinth, and all proceeded toward Grand Junction. On the 4th the Federal army occupied this point, as well as Lagrange, while the cavalrable number of wounded upon the ground. Being always in search of some new weak point, he presented himself successively before Cold Water Bridge, Middleburg and Bolivar, but found everywhere the small Federal garrisons so well prepared to receive him that he did not venture to attack any of them seriously. While Van Dorn was o