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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 10 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for Centreville (Tennessee, United States) or search for Centreville (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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on preparations for a final advance on both sides arrival of Johnston's reenforcements total rout of the enemy. From various causes, I was destined to enjoy but little sleep, and was on the move nearly all night. The great lights around Centreville seemed to die out about midnight, but then arose a low murmuring noise, as if large bodies of men had thus early risen, and were marching through country west of the river. Soon afterwards, being sent to the outposts, my ear quickly detected when all were afoot and ready for moving. The sun had risen in more than usual splendor, and as I stood on a hill across McLean's Ford, gazing upon the distant landscape, the effect was beautiful. To our right and eastward, on the heights of Centreville, Porter's artillery was deliberately shelling Blackburn's and McLean's Fords, the smoke, in the most beautiful and fantastically formed volumes, curling away from the cannon's mouth. Westward, rose the dark outline of the Blue Ridge, which in
ithin a short time it was definitely settled that we should move up the country to Leesburgh — a stone's throw from the Potomac and Maryland. What our ultimate destination might be, none knew or cared. Any thing to get away from Manassas and Centreville, any place where we could have a change of scene, and find butter, eggs, and poultry procurable for money, all such articles having been consumed where we then were, or so few remaining that fabulous prices were asked for them. A couple of cht by their journals that Johnston was in chief command of our troops, and had not less than from thirty to forty thousand men. The truth is, that Johnston and Beauregard were manoeuvring around Fairfax Court-House with the main army, while Centreville and Manassas were being impregnably fortified; the total force with which we made so great a show numbering only some three thousand infantry, with four light field-pieces, and a squadron of cavalry. Evans, however, moved us about continually
cupied the point crossing a hill, and placed our pieces in position, ready for a determined stand. The enemy perceived that we had taken up a strong position, and over-estimating our force, retired without firing a shot. While bivouacked that night, a courier came dashing towards us, and brought the stirring news that McCall, with a heavy force, was marching from Drainsville to cut off Evans at Leesburgh. The latter, therefore, had hastily retreated to Goose Creek, ten miles nearer Centreville, and we were ordered to follow in his track, and if the enemy had really entered the town, a courier would inform us of it on the road, and give time to branch off towards Winchester, to get under the protection of Ashby. This indeed was startling news. The men had travelled much, and were excessively weary. The colonel decided not to call them up for a few hours, but give them rest. Towards twilight all were quietly awakened and informed of the state of things; the men good-humoredly