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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. You can also browse the collection for Centreville (Tennessee, United States) or search for Centreville (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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osition for the works to defend these rivers being at an advanced point, where the streams approached each other within three miles; and this opinion he had expressed in a conversation on the subject with his Chief of Staff, Colonel Jordan, at Centreville. In his interview with General Cooper, some days later, in the Adjutant-General's office, at Richmond, Colonel Jordan laid before him these radical strategic defects in the Confederate positions at Bowling Green, Forts Henry and Donelson, and classmate of his at the Academy at West Point, who afterwards distinguished himself on many a battle-field during the Confederate war. Exposure to the weather had produced upon General Beauregard's health the effect he had feared when leaving Centreville. He was then suffering from a severe cold, accompanied by fever, and the violent inflammation of the throat (laryngitis) which resulted therefrom, detained him at Bowling Green until its evacuation, and, for six months afterwards, caused him
rning; that the Federal army would, no doubt, be found intrenched to the eyes, and ready for our attack; that it was unwise to push, against breastworks, troops so raw and undisciplined as ours, badly armed and worse equipped, while their antagonists, besides the advantage of number, position, discipline, and superiority of arms, were largely composed of men lately victorious at Forts Henry and Donelson; that, from his experience in the war with Mexico and, more recently, at Manassas and Centreville, he considered volunteers, when well commanded and occupying strong defensive positions, equal to regulars, if attacked in front, as the Federals would be by us; General Sherman, in his Memoirs, says of the Federal position: The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a confluent (Owl Creek) to our right front, and Lick Creek, with a similar confluent, on our left, thus narrowing the space over which we could be attacked to one and a half
divided equally between the two places above mentioned. Yours very truly, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. C. S. A. Maj.-Genl. L. Polk, Comdg. forces, Columbus, Ky. Jackson, Tenn., Feb. 24th, 1862. General,—As I had anticipated, before leaving Centreville, I find that the troops at Columbus have not been regularly organized, according to longrecog-nized military usage founded on experience in all services. It is true there is a nominal organization into divisions formed of other subdivisionsthe general officers at Columbus are Major-General Polk, Brigadier-Generals Cheatham, McCown, and A. P. Stewart. Under these circumstances, I must respectfully recall the attention of the department to my letter, written just as I was leaving Centreville, touching the organization of this army. I would, however, so far qualify that letter as to say, that officers serving now with the troops at Columbus, who may have been recommended by Generals Polk and Johnston for the command of brigades, s