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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 7 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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er before the enemy appeared. Floyd proposed to withdraw Buckner's troops from Donelson to Cumberland City, where the railroad diverged from the river, whence a retreat might be easily made to Nashvhat is absolutely necessary for the fort, I think (General Buckner concurs), ought to be at Cumberland City, whither we go from all directions. At 10.30 P. M., February 12th, General Johnston agahe best disposition to make of the troops on this line was to concentrate the main force at Cumberland City-leaving at Fort Donelson enough to make all possible resistance to any attack which may be Nashville, without any obstruction whatever. He proposed, therefore, to concentrate at Cumberland City, and threaten the flank of any force attacking the fort; while, as the railroad diverged frw styles it, began at dawn on the 13th. Floyd arrived before daylight with the troops from Cumberland City; but, before they had taken position, the fighting had begun. Thursday morning, the 13t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
lines and to offensive movements for crippling the enemy's lines — of communication and to prevent his detaching any considerable force to send south. Subordinate reports of operations against Petersburg and Richmond from August 1 to December 31, 1864, will appear in Vol. XLII. By the 7th of February our lines were extended to Hatcher's Run, and the Weldon railroad had been destroyed to Hicksford. General Sherman moved from Chattanooga on the 16th of May, with the Armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Ohio, commanded, respectively, by Generals Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, upon Johnston's army at Dalton; but finding the enemy's positions at Buzzard Roost, covering Dalton, too strong to be assaulted, General McPherson was sent through Snake [Creek] Gap to turn it, while Generals Thomas and Schofield threatened it in front and on the north. This movement was successful. Johnston, finding his retreat likely to be cut off, fell back to his fortified position at Resaca, wher
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 8 (search)
by the 1st of May, when the campaign commenced, the field artillery of your armies, in equipment, outfit, and general supply and condition, was well provided, and in all respects ready for the rough and active service to which it was subsequently subjected. To Brigadier-General Brannan, Colonel Taylor, and Brigadier-General Tillson (the latter succeeded about the commencement of the campaign by Lieutenant-Colonel Schofield), the respective chiefs of artillery of the Armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Ohio, much credit is due for the intelligence, energy, and zeal displayed in perfecting the preparatory arrangements and in the work of reorganizing and refitting their field batteries generally. Brigadier-General Brannan had nearly completed his share of the labor when I entered upon my duties. The entire artillery force that took the field with the active portion of your forces in Northern Georgia, on the 5th of May, 1864, was as follows: Army.Batteries.Officers.Guns.H
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
on, to such weak men as Gideon J. Pillow and John B. Floyd, who were successively placed in chief command of Fort Donelson, at that time. But so it was. Pillow had arrived there on the 10th of the month, Feb., 1862. and with the aid of Major Gilmer, General Johnston's chief engineer, had worked diligently in strengthening the defenses. On the 13th he was superseded by Floyd, who, as we have observed, had fled from Virginia with his followers. See page 102. He had been ordered from Cumberland City by General Johnston, to hasten to Fort Donelson, and take chief command. He arrived there, with Virginia troops, on the morning of the 13th. General Simon B. Buckner was there at the head of re-enforcements from Bowling Green, and he was the only one of the three possessed of sufficient ability and military knowledge to conduct the defense with any hope of success; yet he was subordinate to the other two, until, as we shall observe presently, their fears overcame their honor, and in th
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C., October 16, 1863. Major-General U. S. Grant, Louisville. General: You will receive herewith the orders of the President of the United States, placing you in command of the Departments of the Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee. The organization of these departments will be changed as you may deem most practicable. You will immediately proceed to Chattanooga, and relieve General Rosecrans. You can communicate with Generals Burnside and Sherman by telccurred, which I must note here, to a proper understanding of the case. General Grant had been called from Vicksburg, and sent to Chattanooga to command the military division of the Mississippi, composed of the three Departments of the Ohio, Cumberland, and Tennessee; and the Department of the Tennessee had been devolved on me, with instructions, however, to retain command of the army in the field. At Iuka I made what appeared to me the best disposition of matters relating to the department,
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
he 17th, if possible. Disposing of all matters then pending, I took a steamboat to Cairo, the cars thence to Louisville and Nashville, reaching that place on the 17th of March, 1864. I found General Grant there. He had been to Washington and back, and was ordered to return East to command all the armies of the United States, and personally the Army of the Potomac. I was to succeed him in command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, embracing the Departments of the Ohio, Cumberland, Tennessee, and Arkansas. General Grant was of course very busy in winding up all matters of business, in transferring his command to me, and in preparing for what was manifest would be the great and closing campaign of our civil war. Mrs. Grant and some of their children were with him, and occupied a large house in Nashville, which was used as an office, dwelling, and every thing combined. On the 18th of March I had issued orders assuming command of the Military Division of the Mississippi,
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
nooga to Kenesaw. March, April, and May, 1864. On the 18th day of March, 1864, at Nashville, Tennessee, I relieved Lieutepant-General Grant in command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, embracing the Departments of the Ohio, Cumberland, Tennessee, and Arkansas, commanded respectively by Major-Generals Schofield, Thomas, McPherson, and Steele. General Grant was in the act of starting East to assume command of all the armies of the United States, but more particularly to give directort by two other divisions that were on their veteran furlough, and were under orders to rendezvous at Cairo, before embarking for Clifton, on the Tennessee River. On the 10th of April, 1864, the headquarters of the three Armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Ohio, were at Chattanooga, Huntsville, and Knoxville, and the tables on page 16, et seq., give their exact condition and strength. The Department of the Arkansas was then subject to my commnand, but General Fred Steele, its comman
hat satisfactory explanation may be made, I have directed, upon the exhibition of the case as presented by the two senior Generals, that they should be relieved from command, to await further orders whenever a reliable judgment can be rendered on the merits of the case. Jefferson Davis. Report of John B. Floyd. Camp near Murfrersboro, February 27, 1862. General A. S. Johnston: sir: Your order of the twelfth of this month, transmitted to me by telegraph from Bowling Green to Cumberland City, reached me the same evening. It directed me to repair at once, with what force I could command, to the support of the garrison at Fort Donelson. I immediately prepared for my departure, and effected it in time to reach Fort Donelson the next morning, thirteenth, before daylight. Measures had been already taken by Brig.-General Pillow, then in command, to render our resistance to the attack of the enemy as effective as possible. He had, with activity and industry, pushed forward the
the battle above the clouds. The day had been one of dense mists and rains, and much of General Hooker's battle was fought above the clouds, which concealed him from our view, but from which his musketry was heard.--General Meigs to Secretary Stanton. By the banks of Chattanooga watching with a soldier's heed, In the chilly autumn morning, gallant Grant was on his steed: For the foe had climbed above him with the banners of their band, And the cannon swept the river from the hills of Cumberland. Like a trumpet rang his orders: “Howard, Thomas, to the bridge! One brigade aboard the Dunbar! Storm the heights of Mission Ridge, On the left the ledges, Sherman, charge and hurl the rebels down! Hooker, take the steeps of Lookout and the slopes before the town!” Fearless, from the northern summits, looked the traitors, where they lay, On the gleaming Union army, marshalled as for muster-day, Till the sudden shout of battle thundered upward its alarms, And they dropped their idle glass
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
ore, along with those at Pensacola, went to arm the Confederacy. With immense energy on the part of the Southern officers, the Merrimac was raised, her upper decks removed, and the ship reconstructed as an armored vessel. Her advent in Hampton Roads, March 8, 1862, where in the first moment were but some wooden ships, among them the large steam frigate Minnesota and the sailing frigates Congress and Cumberland, brought on a memorably heroic fight, in which the Congress was burned and the Cumberland sunk with her colors flying. That night came almost providentially the Monitor, with her heroic commander, Lieutenant Worden, and her equally courageous first lieutenant, S. Dana Greene. The fight of the next day, its outcome, the withdrawal of the Merrimac, her later destruction by the Confederates, and the effect upon the world, we all know. Besides saving to the Union the possession of Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay, it saved a possible appearance of what, up to that moment, was an
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