hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 7 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
e Federal General George W. Morgan, was at Cumberland Gap; a division with 6411 for duty, under Geneors. and 635 artillery. The occupation of Cumberland Gap, June 18th, by a Federal division, and theFederal General G. W. Morgan, who occupied Cumberland Gap. General Smith started on the 14th en roututting off the supplies of the garrison at Cumberland Gap, but learning that they were well provisioeorge W. Morgan (Federal), who was left at Cumberland Gap with 8682 men, seeing these active movemenn returns for June, deducting the force at Cumberland Gap, showed 56,706 present for duty, and his Oined to retreat to Knoxville by the way of Cumberland Gap. It was evident that Buell's large army weard of General Bragg's withdrawal through Cumberland Gap, and could not easily be convinced of the against General [G. W.] Morgan in front of Cumberland Gap. Should he be successful, and our well-grstores, and 2000 horses. We had recovered Cumberland Gap and redeemed middle Tennessee and north Al
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
f General Smith, the command was then divided for separate service. I was ordered to proceed with 600 men of the 2d Kentucky to the vicinity of Covington, whence General Heth, who had threatened Cincinnati, was then retiring. Colonel Morgan was ordered, with the remainder of the regiment, Gano's squadron, and all the cavalry recruits then organized, to march to the assistance of General Marshall in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. The Federal general, George W. Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap, and followed by Stevenson, who had been instructed to observe and pursue him if he moved, was making his way to the Ohio. It was intended that Marshall and Morgan should intercept and arrest his march until Stevenson could overtake him and attack him in rear. The detachment under my command became immediately very actively engaged with the enemy, who, in considerable numbers, had crossed the river and advanced to Walton, twenty-five miles south of Covington. For several days, skir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
ish a junction promptly with the force under G. W. Morgan operating against Cumberland Gap, and give actual possession of east Tennessee, which the mere occupation of were answered with orders from Washington to first open communication with Cumberland Gap, where General G. W. Morgan was not in danger, and had abundant supplies foW. Morgan in command of the Seventh division of the army, to operate in the Cumberland Gap road from Kentucky to east Tennessee, and required him to take the Gap if phe meantime Kirby Smith with his troops should attack and capture Morgan at Cumberland Gap. The strength of Morgan's fortified position, however, with 8000 good troo arrival Nelson reported a force of 30,000 raw troops. General Morgan at Cumberland Gap was promptly aware of Kirby Smith's movement, and informed me of it on the ed for a year; but that is not substantially true, except with reference to Cumberland Gap, and as to that, it is to be remarked that it had been held at a greater co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
ord with orders from General Buell to take Cumberland Gap, fourteen miles to the southward, and occuted to. A few days after our occupation of Cumberland Gap, June 18th, General Spears, without authort direction. About four miles south of Cumberland Gap is a narrow defile formed by an abrupt mouer, through which passes the State Road to Cumberland Gap, and on the edge of the defile was an abannel J. E. Rains to cover the evacuation of Cumberland Gap, The Confederate forces covering the mock south-eastward to the Clinch Mountains. Cumberland Gap was ours without the loss of a single lifeconsin Plan of the Confederate works at Cumberland Gap, June 14, 1862. from a drawing by Captainate of the roads, were now sent forward to Cumberland Gap with a large supply of ammunition, and magbluegrass region through the wilderness to Cumberland Gap. Colonel De Courcy and Captain Joseph EBragg on our left, and Humphrey View of Cumberland Gap from the South, Sept. 14, 1862. from a Li[6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
dquarters were established at Chattanooga on the 29th. On the 30th Major-General Kirby Smith visited General Bragg at that point, and it was arranged that Smith should move at once against the Federal forces under General George W. Morgan in Cumberland Gap. In this interview General Bragg was very certain that he would begin his forward move in ten or fifteen days at latest, and if Kirby Smith was successful in his operation against Morgan he would be on his offensive against Buell. Kirby Smit was abandoned at Rock Castle, that officer was engaged over twenty-six times. His vigilance was so well known by the infantry that they never feared a surprise. Hard marching, stony roads, and deep fords lay before us until we had crossed Cumberland Gap. But at last almost all that had been taken out of Kentucky was safely conveyed to Morristown, Tenn. About the 31st of October, 1862, General Bragg, having made a short visit to Richmond, there obtained the sanction of the Confederate Gov
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
o look after the remainder of my new command. Burnside was in about as desperate a condition as the Army of the Cumberland had been, only he was not yet besieged. He was a hundred miles from the nearest possible base, Big South Fork of the Cumberland River, and much farther from any railroad we had possession of. The roads back were over mountains, and all supplies along the line had long since been exhausted. His animals, too, had been starved, and their carcasses lined the road from Cumberland Gap, and far back toward Lexington, Kentucky. East Tennessee still furnished supplies of beef, bread, and forage, but it did not supply ammunition, clothing,, medical supplies, or small rations, such as coffee, sugar, salt, and rice. Stopping to organize his new command, Sherman had started from Memphis for Corinth on the 11th of October. His instructions required him to repair the road in his rear in order to bring up supplies. The distance was about 330 miles through a hostile country
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Knoxville. (search)
nion sentiments were known to exist to a very considerable extent. It was accordingly arranged that Rosecrans should move from Murfreesboro' against Bragg, while a force should be organized in central Kentucky to move toward Knoxville in cooperation. The latter movement was intrusted to General Burnside, who occupied Knoxville on the 2d of September, 1863, with part of the Twenty-third Corps, and on the 9th received the surrender of the Confederate force under General John W. Frazer at Cumberland Gap. The greater portion of General Burnside's force was now expected to move down the Valley of the Tennessee to a connection (possibly a junction) with Rosecrans, then at Chattanooga or its vicinity. This involved leaving Knoxville to be held by a small force, and rendered it necessary to fortify the place. Accordingly, as chief engineer, I was instructed to arrange for a garrison of 600 men, intended only to hold the place against a cavalry dash. During the enemy's occupation of K