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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders.. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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nes to evacuate Kentucky. retreat through Cumberland Gap. disappointment at Richmond. errours of Tennessee, was Buell's army, and occupying Cumberland Gap, was Gen. Morgan. Early in August four e used to operate upon the enemy's left at Cumberland Gap, and he was requested to confer with Brig.large detached commands at McMinnville and Cumberland Gap. Having crossed the river at Chattanooga,heastern Tennessee, and gained the rear of Cumberland Gap, held by the enemy in strong force well fovance, been cut off with his detachment at Cumberland Gap, effected his retreat to Cincinnati; the fern Tennessee and Kentucky, to and through Cumberland Gap, would then become utterly impassable to aer Polk and Smith, on the 13th October for Cumberland Gap. After a rapid march, with some privationTennessee, and had recovered possession of Cumberland Gap, the gateway to the heart of the Confedera Confederacy. In four weeks after passing Cumberland Gap, Bragg's army was found, with serried rank[1 more...]
nt of the distinguished captive and his officers. surrender of Cumberland Gap. President Davis' commentary on this event. recoil of seriousnside's invasion of East Tennessee. Gen. Frazier in command at Cumberland Gap. his correspondence with Gen. Buckner. the defences of the Ga to shoot an invader wherever they can see one. Surrender of Cumberland Gap. In the month of September occurred the surrender of CumberlCumberland Gap --a misfortune which President Davis declared laid open Eastern Tennessee and Southwestern Virginia to hostile operations, and broke t a close investigation of the subject; and it will be seen that Cumberland Gap is but another instance in which such charges, on a detail of fKentucky into Tennessee at Big Creek Gap, forty miles south of Cumberland Gap, which latter position was held by Gen. Frazier for the Confede Gen. Frazier surrendered unconditionally. The occupation of Cumberland Gap gave Burnside an uninterrupted line of communication from Knoxv
ters at Rogersville. He had hoped to find his railroad communications with Virginia open; but at this time Averill's raid had cut the railroad, compelling Longstreet to fall back upon his own resources, and completely isolating him in a wild and difficult country. The weather was bitterly cold; the mountains were covered with snow; more than half of the men were barefooted; and the cavalry was engaged in daily skirmishes with the enemy, while gleaning supplies east of a line drawn from Cumberland Gap to Cleveland. In February, 1864, the lines of communication with Virginia were repaired; but it was not until the rigour of winter broke that the hardy soldiers under Longstreet united again with Gen. Lee in Virginia, and were on the old ground about Gordonsville. Operations in Virginia in the fall of 1863. While such was the train of disaster that followed the brilliant but ill-starred victory of Chickamauga, the record of the operations of the Army of Northern Virginia was compa