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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ssignment to command occupation of Bowling Green by General Buckner General Zollicoffer at Cumberland Gap General Polk holds left wing at Columbus Federal advance from Louisville John H. Morgan ashville railroad crosses Green river. General Zollicoffer having previously been ordered to Cumberland Gap, the line of defense was thus established, with Columbus as the left, Bowling Green the center and Cumberland Gap the right. This was a line which from the topography of the country presented many serious difficulties, there being no direct communication by rail between the center and eitheormidable force collecting in his front from Louisville; and General Zollicoffer, at or near Cumberland Gap, had about 5,000 of all arms in a country scant of supplies and with no railroad base nearerions. To his other expedients he added the construction of fortifications at Bowling Green, Cumberland Gap and at Forts Donelson and Henry—the latter respectively on the Cumberland and Tennessee rive
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
y, looking to the shortening of lines and the greater concentration of troops in the direction of Bowling Green. General Thomas, who had been operating toward Cumberland Gap, was moved to Somerset and also occupied points on the upper Green river upon General Johnston's right flank. Preparations were also made for an advance upon the latter's front by repairing the Green river bridge at Munfordville. The condition of the roads on the Cumberland Gap line rendering movements there by either army impracticable, General Zollicoffer's command was transferred to Monticello, placing him in closer connection with General Johnston and looking to the better protecd position and putting Green river at his back. He had great difficulty in resisting importunities from Washington to push Thomas into East Tennessee through Cumberland Gap, and adhered to his own plan in his operations, which resulted in the defeat of Crittenden. Mr. Lincoln, barring his eagerness to please Brownlow and Andrew
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
. It would also please me to see General Preston along, but I fear to make too great a draft on your command. If agreeable to yourself and General Van Dom you have no time to lose. We only await our train and the capture of the forces at Cumberland Gap, both of which we hope to hear from very soon. Our prospects were never more encouraging. Most respectfully and truly yours, Braxton Bragg. General Breckinridge was eager to go into Kentucky, but said that even if Van Dorn would gi would have recruited them to a maximum, and might have given or left for us a different history of that period. As it was, vexatious delays still further detained him, and it was not until October 14th that he was able to leave Knoxville. When he had reached within twenty-eight miles of Cumberland Gap on the 17th, he received an order from General Bragg written at Barboursville, Ky., October 14th, directing him to return to Knoxville. His further operations will appear in a later chapter.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
Reduction of East Tennessee General G. W. Morgan's advance on Cumberland Gap its final occupation by him General Bragg Succeeds General Been. George W. Morgan had already been sent with his division to Cumberland Gap, to co-operate by a movement upon Knoxville from that point. An, of Buell's army, had already moved with his division against Cumberland Gap, and by flanking it through gaps to the south, had reached the regard for aid, stating that his department was threatened from Cumberland Gap and Middle Tennessee. Beauregard replied that it would be fatao other infantry nearer than that confronting General Morgan at Cumberland Gap. A vigorous movement on Chattanooga would have resulted in itse says: General Buell's column is moving toward Chattanooga and Cumberland Gap. If the enemy should have evacuated East Tennessee and CumberlCumberland Gap, as reported, Buell will probably move on Atlanta. It will probably take some time to clean out the guerrilla parties in West Tenness
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
done. While thus hampered, neglected, and overwhelmed with the magnitude of the work before him and the responsibility of protecting a line of 300 miles from Cumberland Gap to Corinth, Gen. John H. Morgan spread consternation throughout Kentucky and Tennessee by his great raid into the former State. Leaving Knoxville on the 4th rned two long buildings of commissary stores, consisting of upward of 500 sacks of coffee and a large amount of other supplies in bulk, marked for the army at Cumberland Gap. I also destroyed a very large amount of clothing, boots, etc. I burned the hospital buildings, which appeared to have been recently erected and fitted up, t regiments of cavalry, directed General Boyle to send two regiments and a squadron of cavalry to Mount Sterling and Lexington; notified Gen. Geo. W. Morgan at Cumberland Gap of the danger to his line of supplies and hoped he could send a regiment, and assured General Boyle that although he had not a man to spare from his work, he
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
mn Smith's column General Smith's bold plan its successful execution Cumberland Gap turned, and Eastern Kentucky occupied Scott's cavalry battle of Richmond t of East Tennessee with headquarters at Knoxville. With the occupation of Cumberland Gap by Gen. Geo. W. Morgan a few days after this, and the demonstration made byservice. He is opposed by General Morgan, occupying a strong position near Cumberland Gap, with four brigades estimated at 10,000 effectives. General Heth commands d that General Smith shall move at once against General Morgan, in front of Cumberland Gap. Should he be successful and our well-grounded hopes be fulfilled, our entity has offered them no protection. Both Buell at Bridgeport and Morgan at Cumberland Gap are now and have been for some days on short rations, owing to the exhaustimber of wagons loaded with quartermaster and commissary stores destined for Cumberland Gap. On the 23d he attacked Col. Leonidas Metcalfe, of the Seventh Kentucky c
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
Even courier service was doubtful on account of bushwhacking home guards. He was confronted with a problem requiring prompt solution. A study of the map will show to the military student, judging by abstract rules, and not by the light of after occurrences, that his movement to Bardstown, where he could obtain immediate supplies, be in position to effect early junction with Kirby Smith for advance upon Louisville, and to connect himself with his new line of communication south, via Cumberland Gap, was the best alternative. He had been delayed by the Munfordville affair nearly a week in his direct movement toward Lexington, and had to make his plans conform to his necessities. That the morale of the army was, notwithstanding the capture of Munfordville, affected by this movement, which had some of the features of retreat, cannot be doubted; for there were, besides, other reasons of disappointment. The reports which had reached the South represented that the people of Kentuck
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
agg, fearing that he would seize upon his depot of supplies at Bryantsville, twelve or fourteen miles east of Harrodsburg, or cut off his communications with Cumberland Gap, instead of following him marched for Bryantsville on the morning of the 11th, and by the time he reached that point the enemy occupied Harrodsburg. The rerious enemy free to move at will in any direction. In view of this situation, the council with one exception, concurred in the propriety of a retreat through Cumberland Gap while the route was open and the roads were yet good. Gen. Humphrey Marshall, who simultaneously with General Bragg's advance into Kentucky had come through nia by way of Pound Gap. General Bragg so far acceded to his proposition as to permit his return the same way. And so it was resolved to evacuate Kentucky. Cumberland Gap had been abandoned on September 17th by Gen. Geo. W. Morgan, who had made his way through the mountains by way of Manchester, Beattyville and West Liberty to
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
ral Smith's column at Big Hill Buell Draws off from pursuit and Prepares to return to Nashville Confederate forces Reunite at London and pass safely through Cumberland Gap Breckinridge with his Kentuckians turned back and sent to Murfreesboro General Buell Congratulated by General Halleck, and directed to take East Tennessee eneral Bragg was conducted without further incident, the roads and weather fortunately being favorable, and on the 20th the advance of the army passed through Cumberland Gap. Yet it was an arduous retreat. The change from a country of plenty, with high hopes of wintering in Kentucky, to hard marches with scant food and disappoinoorly clad and shod to encounter a severe snow storm upon entering East Tennessee. Gen. John C. Breckinridge, having been turned back on the 17th when nearing Cumberland Gap, as already related, had moved into Middle Tennessee, and on the 28th of October arrived at Murfreesboro with 2,000 men as the advance guard of the army of oc
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
nfederate soldier; for the heart of the private soldier throbbed with the same pride of birth and name as that of the commanding general. Private Hodge, the Confederate congressman, was soon made a captain and acting adjutant-general of Breckinridge's division. For gallantry at the battle of Shiloh he was promoted to major, with commission bearing date of May 6, 1862. Continuing to act as adjutant-general he was promoted to colonel, May 6, 1863. He was for a while inspector-general at Cumberland Gap, and commanded Preston's cavalry in various operations in east Tennessee. Coming to north Georgia with the forces under Buckner, he participated in Wheeler's raid in middle Tennessee, after Chickamauga, and was commended by Wheeler for his good conduct in command of a cavalry brigade. On August 2, 1864, he was commissioned brigadier-general and put in command of the district of Southwest Mississippi and East Louisiana, remaining in that position until the end of the war. He then return