hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 41 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) or search for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

a raft of an old saw-mill, and floated his mountain howitzer over, towing it by our picket-ropes. Every body was in a good humor, and had lots of fun over our gunboat, as the boys called the raft. He had sent Colonel Munroe (One Hundred and Twenty-third Illinois) with his regiment to destroy the railroad bridge over Elk River in the rear of Tullahoma, but Withers's division of infantry got there three hundred yards ahead of him. He then returned to Hillsboro. Wilder's command moved on to Dechard that night, and after a sharp skirmish with the garrison of about eighty men in a stockade, drove them out — they escaped in the dark. He destroyed the telegraph-wire, capturing the instruments, and burning the depot, which was full of commissary goods; also the water-tanks and railroad bridge on the Winchester road, and tore up and destroyed three hundred yards of the Chattanooga railroad track. This could not be done very fast on account of the darkness. At twelve o'clock, midnight, si
and extend in a southwesterly direction toward the line of the Cossa, the general direction of which, from the crossing of the Atlanta road to Rome and thence to Gadsden, is south-west. From the position of our army at McMinnville, Tullahoma, Decherd, and Winchester, to reach Chattanooga, crossing the Tennessee above it, it was necessary, either to pass north of the Sequatchie Valley, by Pikesville or Kingston, or to cross the main Cumberland and the Sequatchie Valley by Dunlap or Thurman anull of barren oak ridges, sparsely settled, and but a small part of it under cultivation. Prelimiinary operations of the army. The first step was to repair the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, to bring forward to Tullahoma, McMinnville, Dechard, and Winchester needful forage and subsistence, which it was impossible to transport from Murfreesboro to those points over the horrible roads which we encountered on our advance to Tullahoma. The next was to extend the repairs of the main stem
econd division. The enemy showed himself in force, the Seventh Pennsylvania skirmished with him a short time. Camped one mile south of the river, the Fourth Michigan remaining on the north side to guard Stokes's battery. July 3.--Marched to Decherd, the Fourth Michigan making a dash into that place, but finding that the rebs had removed, camped a mile and a half from Decherd. July 4.--In camp, Fourth Michigan sent to Tullahoma for rations. July 5.--In camp, rejoined by Third Indiana.Decherd. July 4.--In camp, Fourth Michigan sent to Tullahoma for rations. July 5.--In camp, rejoined by Third Indiana. July 6.--Marched to within five miles of Salem and went into camp. July 7.--In camp. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Robt. H. G. Minty, Colonel Commanding. General Wheeler received a severe wound (shot through the body a little above the left groin) while crossing the river. One hundred and eighteen dead rebels have been taken out of the river. Fifteen were buried on the field, and in every house was left from one to four too badly wounded to be moved.
d about seven miles, toward Tullahoma, Tenn., and encamped for the night. June 29.--Remained in camp all day. Lieutenant Corbin was sent to the front with one section of the battery for picket. Left camp at six P. M. June 30.--Lieutenant Corbin returned to camp with the section at seven A. M. July 1.--Marched to Tullahoma. The enemy were gone, evidently having left in great haste. We encamped one mile south of the town. July 2.--Marched from Tullahoma in the direction of Decherd, Tennessee. Arrived at Stearns's Mill at ten o'clock A. M., where we halted to await orders. General Negley soon ordered me to the front on double-quick. Arriving at the front. I found that the position which I was to occupy was filled by two batteries from his own division. In compliance with General Beattey's order I remained in the road, directly in their rear, until General Thomas ordered me to rejoin the First brigade, which I did, and with it moved to the upper ford on Elk River, where
progressing, I determined to cut, if possible, the railroad in Bragg's rear. Wilder's brigade was sent to burn Elk River bridge and destroy the railroad between Decherd and Cowan, and Brigadier-General John Beatty, with a brigade of infantry, to Hillsboro, to cover and support his movements. General Sheridan's division came innd the enemy at Elk Bridge, with a brigade of infantry and a battery, which prevented him from destroying that bridge; but he had damaged the road considerably at Decherd, where his appearance with his mountain howitzers created great consternation, and within three hours brought down some heavy trains of infantry. Meanwhile we enemy during the night burned the bridge and retired before morning. General Turchin, with a small brigade of cavalry, had pushed forward from Hillsboro, on the Decherd road, and found the enemy's cavalry at the fords of Elk, near Morris Ferry; engaged them coming up, and, reenforced by the arrival of General Mitchell, they force