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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 41 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) or search for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
upon his plan of campaign, and much depended upon the course pursued by the Federal army. As early as the 22d General Buell had established his headquarters at Decherd, on the Nashville Railroad, thirty miles north-west of Stevenson, and had all the supplies at Stevenson transferred to that place. On August 6th, during this advance from Stevenson to Decherd, Brig.-Gen. Robert L. McCook (of Thomas's division; brother to Alex. McD. McCook), who, being ill, was riding in an ambulance, was mortally wounded by the enemy's scouts near New Market.--editors. Two parallel mountain ranges, running north-east and south-west, separated him from Chattanooga. A rn's divisions, while the divisions of Schoepf, McCook, and Thomas L. Crittenden were near the Nashville and Stevenson Railroad within easy call of headquarters at Decherd. Buell seemed impressed with the belief that Bragg's objective point was Nashville, and that he would take the short route over the mountain by way of Altamont,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
ad for his supplies; or he might cross the mountains by direct roads toward middle Tennessee. In either case, Stevenson, on the south side of a declining spur of the Cumberland Mountains reaching to Huntsville, was unsuitable for our depot, and Decherd, on the north side, was adopted instead. On the 19th of August I received information from General McCook, who was at Battle Creek with his own and Crittenden's divisions, that the enemy was crossing in force at Chattanooga. My plans were alittle lower down, and united with the Thurman road further north. They had previously been provided with rockets and a signal code for communicating with each other and with the rest of the army. The same day I went to Battle Creek and then to Decherd to superintend the further concentration, for which general instructions had already been given. Altamont, in advance of McMinnville, was designated as the point of junction, though that could have been modified, if desirable, after an examinat