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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 41 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) or search for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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army now rested a little, while reconnoissances were made to ascertain the position of the enemy, and Wilder was sent to strike tile railroad in Bragg's rear near Decherd, burn Elk river bridge, and do whatever other execution he might. He failed in this — the bridge being too strongly held — but damaged the railroad a little, andmber; while the Government property destroyed must have been worth millions of dollars. Roddy, who crossed Oct. 11. the Tennessee at Guntersville, threatening Decherd, retreated on learning that Wheeler had done so, and escaped without loss. Gen. Grant, having assumed Oct 18. at Louisville command of his new department, nd the Elk unbridged and unfordable, and was compelled to move up its right bank to Fayetteville, crossing there on a stone bridge, and marching by Winchester and Decherd to Bridgeport; Nov. 13. whence lie forthwith reported in person to Grant at Chattanooga, Nov. 15. being at once made acquainted with the plans of the Genera
es prior to the arrival of the 18th Michigan and 102d Ohio to reenforce him; compelling them also to succumb, after a sharp contest. Forrest now raided north to Pulaski, destroying the railroad and capturing a fortified post by the way; skirmishing heavily all day Sept. 27. at Pulaski; but Gen. Roussean was here, and had hastily collected such a force that an assault would have been madness; so Forrest drew off eastward and struck the Chattanooga railroad Sept. 29. near Tullahoma and Decherd, doing it some damage; but Rousseau had moved rapidly around by rail through Nashville, and again confronted him at Tullahoma; while Gen. Steedman, leading 5,000 men, crossed the Tennessee from northern Georgia, and advanced upon him from the south-west; Morgan's division of the 14th corps moving simultaneously from Atlanta to cooperate in enveloping and crushing him. All in vain. Forrest turned on his track, and pushed south-east to Fayetteville; there dividing his forces and sending B