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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 41 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) or search for Decherd (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
ens, touches at Tullahoma, descends into the valley of Elk River, which it crosses at Estell Springs, and meets again at Decherd the line to Fayetteville. Then, following from Cowan the gorge of Boiling Creek, it goes through a tunnel under a dividirecting him to destroy the railroad-bridge built across that stream near Estell Springs, while he (Wilder) moves toward Decherd. Monroe cannot carry out the instructions given him: a brigade belonging to Withers' division, brought up by the railroon Elk River, he falls back upon Hillsborough. Wilder is more fortunate. At eight o'clock in the evening he arrives at Decherd, puts to flight the guard which defends the post, and immediately undertakes to destroy the railroad track. But toward roach. A regiment of cavalry despatched on the 28th to Hillsborough encounters Beatty's brigade, and Withers reports at Decherd the presence of Wilder. These circumstances do not yet reveal any serious movement on the part of the enemy. In fact,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
p the right bank a distance of fifty-six miles, as far as Fayetteville, where a stone bridge offers him at last, on the 8th, an easy crossing. A detachment of the Twelfth corps occupies at this point the terminus of the branch which diverges at Decherd from the Nashville and Stevenson line. Sherman is thus in direct communication with Grant. Hence on his arrival he finds detailed orders and, what is better appreciated by his soldiers, about a hundred thousand rations. In order easily to subsist his troops Grant advises him to divide them into several columns. He therefore starts out with two divisions as far as Decherd, where the Fourth takes the Anderson and Stevenson road, while the Third moves on Bridgeport via the village of University. Meantime, Blair with the two other divisions takes, by way of New Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, a road which is longer, but traverses a country not so poor. Sherman reaches Bridgeport in the evening of the 13th, but he has with him