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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
ho changed the wail of despair of the American people into shouts of victory, were from Virginia. Two future Presidents of the United. States, of Southern birth, were in that battle, one of whom was wounded. The only general officer there slain, was from Fredericksburg, Virginia, and he was commanding Southern troops. The retreat at White Plains would have been a terrible disaster, but for the charge of Southern troops that drove back, for a time, the British, flushed with victory. At Germantown, a Southern brigade gained deathless honor, and the life-blood of a North Carolina general was poured out. After the massacre by the Indians in the valley of Wyoming, 1776, George Rogers Clark, of Virginia, with a brigade of his countrymen, penetrated to the upper Mississippi, chastised tile savage butchers, captured the British Governor of Detroit and seized £ 10,000 sterling, a most seasonable addition to our scanty currency. The Virginia troops bore the brunt of the battle of Brandywin
urhood to ascertain the force there. They brought word that a strong body of infantry and artillery was at Centreville; Colonel Wyndham's brigade of cavalry at Germantown, a mile from Fairfax; and toward the railroad station another brigade of infantry. Fairfax thus appeared to be inclosed within a cordon of all arms, rendering he party had to steal off with their captures, if any were made, or cut their way through, and on that black night no uniform was discernible. Mosby approached Germantown by the Little River turnpike; but fearing Wyndham's cavalry, obliqued to the right, and took to the woods skirting the Warrenton road. Centreville was thus, with its garrison, on his right and rear, Germantown on his left, and Fairfax, winged with infantry camps, in his front. It was now raining heavily, and the night was like pitch. The party advanced by bridle-paths through the woods, thus avoiding the pickets of the main avenues of approach, and the incessant patter of the rain dr
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. (search)
d here my sketch might end. I will add, however, a somewhat curious incident which occurred a day or two after the battle. General Stuart followed the enemy on Sunday, and coming up with his rear at the bridge over Cub Run, had a slight artillery engagement, and took many prisoners. The bridge was destroyed and the cavalry turned to the left, and making a circuit came into the Little River turnpike, at the mouth of the Frying Pan road. Proceeding down the turnpike in the direction of Germantown, a squadron captured a company of the enemy's cavalry; and advancing further to a small tavern on the roadside, took prisoners another company who were feeding their horses in fancied security at the place. This cavalry formed a portion of that which had operated in the battles around Groveton; and in possession of one of the men was found Hardeman Stuart's coat, captured with his horse and accoutrements on the mountain. There was no trouble at all in identifying the coat. In the
d here my sketch might end. I will add, however, a somewhat curious incident which occurred a day or two after the battle. General Stuart followed the enemy on Sunday, and coming up with his rear at the bridge over Cub Run, had a slight artillery engagement, and took many prisoners. The bridge was destroyed and the cavalry turned to the left, and making a circuit came into the Little River turnpike, at the mouth of the Frying Pan road. Proceeding down the turnpike in the direction of Germantown, a squadron captured a company of the enemy's cavalry; and advancing further to a small tavern on the roadside, took prisoners another company who were feeding their horses in fancied security at the place. This cavalry formed a portion of that which had operated in the battles around Groveton; and in possession of one of the men was found Hardeman Stuart's coat, captured with his horse and accoutrements on the mountain. There was no trouble at all in identifying the coat. In the
il the middle of July, when it came away with unseemly haste. In fact, a column of about fifty-five thousand blue-coats were after it; and the Third detachment, with their gun, had a narrow escape. They were posted, solus, near the village of Germantown, with the trees cut down, four hundred and thirty yards by measurement, in front to afford range for the fire. Here they awaited with cheerfulness the advance of the small Federal force, until a horseman galloped up with, Gentlemen! The enemythe rear. The odds of fifty-five thousand against twenty-five was too great for the Third; and they accordingly limbered to the rear, retiring with more haste than dignity. A friend had seen the huge blue column passing from Flint Hill toward Germantown, and had exclaimed with tragic pathos that the present historian was gone. He was truly gone when the enemy arrived-gone from that redoubt and destined to be hungry and outflanked at Centreville. The Revolutionnaires had but an insignifica
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 16: second Manassa's. (search)
into the Little River turnpike, which leads eastward, and intersects the Warrenton road at Fairfax Court House, far in the rear of Centreville. No sooner was this movement perceived by the enemy, than they resumed a hasty retreat. But as their crowded column approached Fairfax Court House, they found Jackson at hand, prepared to strike their line of march from the side. They therefore detached a strong force to make head against him, and posted it upon a ridge near the little hamlet of Germantown. As soon as Jackson ascertained the position of this force, he threw his infantry into line of battle, Hill on the right, Ewell in the centre, and his old division on the left, and advanced to the assault. The enemy, knowing that the salvation of their army depended upon them, made a desperate resistance, and the combat assumed a sudden fury in the front of Hill, equal to that of any previous struggle. The enemy were encouraged by a momentary success in breaking Hayes' brigade, but his
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 4: details of the battle of Manassas. (search)
mmand of General McDowell. Jas. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant General. This order deserves to be exhumed from the oblivion into which it seems to have fallen, and is in strong contrast with the subsequent practice under Butler, Pope, Milroy, Hunter, Sheridan, Sherman, etc. This war order of McDowell's might well have been commended to the consideration of military satraps set, to rule over the people of the South in a time of peace. It did not prevent the burning of the entire village of Germantown, a few miles from Fairfax Court-House, but the citizens agreed that McDowell had made an honest effort to prevent depredations by his troops; and it gives me pleasure to make the statement, as it is the last time I will have occasion to make a similar one in regard to any of the Federal commanders who followed him. Pursuit of the enemy was not made after the battle in order to capture Washington or cross the Potomac, and as this omission has been the subject of much comment and critici
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
19, 20, 29, 186 Gardner, Lieutenant Colonel, 27 Garland, General S., 12, 158 Garnett, Lieutenant, 8 Garnett's Expedition, 336 Gayle's House, 357 General Conscription, 64 Georgetown, 42, 134, 387 Georgetown Pike, 387, 389, 390, 391 Georgia Troops, 27, 49, 50, 67, 78, 81, 95, 97, 98, 99, 107, 109, 111, 115, 116, 118, 124, 125, 127, 131, 153, 173-77, 180, 185, 190, 193, 259, 280, 333, 336, 349, 362, 388, 390, 393, 468 Germana Ford, 317, 319, 324, 325, 344, 346 Germantown, 40 Gettysburg, 254-58,264, 266,267,271, 272, 275, 276, 278, 279, 282, 286- 288, 290, 478 Gibbon, General (U. S. A.), 198, 206, 209, 225 Gibson, Captain, 28 Gibson, Colonel, 153 Gilmor, Major H., 333-34, 338, 340, 383, 394, 460 Gilmore, General (U. S. A.), 393 Gloucester Point, 59, 61 Godwin, Colonel, 249, 274-75, 311- 314 Godwin, General, 423, 427 Goggin, Major, 449, 451 Goldsborough, Major, 243 Goodwin, Colonel, 385 Gordon, General J. B., 192, 209-11, 22
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
in Virginia. The English volley lighted patriotic fires in the hearts of the colonists with the rapidity electricity flies in this age from the touch of the button. The sword was substituted for the law book in the hands of Henry Lee, and we find him, at the age of nineteen, after the battle of Lexington, a captain of cavalry, being nominated for that position by Patrick Henry, the orator of American liberty. He rose rapidly in his new career. In the Northern Department at Brandywine, Germantown, Springfield, and in the operations in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, his address, cool courage, great ability, and unceasing activity as an outpost officer speedily drew the attention of his superiors. Congress recognized his services, promoted him, and gave him an independent partisan corps. Ever thereafter his position in the war was near the flashing of the guns. His duties kept him close to the enemy's lines, and his legion was what cavalry should be — the eyes and ears of
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 9: Second battle of Manassas. (search)
fax Court House. As soon as this movement was perceived Pope abandoned Centreville. Hooker was immediately ordered to Fairfax Court House to take up a line on the Little River pike to prevent Lee's troops getting in his rear at the point where it joins the Warrenton pike, the movement to be supported by the rest of his army. As his troops reached the vicinity of Fairfax Court House, Jackson determined to attack them, and moved at once upon the force which had been posted on a ridge near Germantown for the purpose of driving them before him, so he could be in a position to command the pike from Centreville to Alexandria, down which Pope's troops must pass on their retreat. A sanguinary battle ensued just before sunset, terminated by darkness. The battle of Oxhill, as it was called, was fought in the midst of a thunderstorm. Longstreet's troops came on the field toward its conclusion. The loss on both sides was heavy, the Federals losing two of their best generals, Kearny and Ste
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