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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 56 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 54 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 42 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 32 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 12 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 10 0 Browse Search
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l. The Tennessee flows northwest for some distance, until a little west of Hamburg, a point nineteen miles from Corinth, it takes its final bend to the north. Hampy bottom that here fringes the Tennessee. It was three or four miles below Hamburg, six or seven above Savannah, the Federal depot on the right bank, and twenty- On the 3d of April Buell suggested that he had better cross the Tennessee at Hamburg, and Halleck replied, directing him to halt at Waynesboro, thirty miles from SFrom Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Saanding4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg tHamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 From Pittsburg to Crump's Landing4 From Crump's Landing to Coffee8 From Coffee to Chalk-Bluff Landing2 From Chalk-Bluff Landing to Saltillo12 From Saltillo to Decatur Furnace18
either in the direction of Mickey's or Pratt's house, on the direct road to Pittsburg — if that road is found practicable-or in the direction of the Ridge road to Hamburg, throwing all its cavalry on the latter road as far as its intersection with the one to Pittsburg, passing through Grier's Ford, on Lick Creek. This cavalry will throw well forward advanced guards and videttes toward Grier's Ford, and in the direction of Hamburg, and, during the impending battle, when called to the field of combat, will move by the Grier's Ford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The Reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under the command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V.-General Bragg will detach the Fifty-first and Fifty-second Regiments, Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama, and D
and advanced to support the left of Bragg's corps and line of battle when menaced by the enemy, and the other two brigades were directed to advance by the road to Hamburg, to support Bragg's right; and at the same time Maney's regiment, of Polk's corps, was advanced by the same road to reinforce the regiment of cavalry and battery e and there, and was getting ragged, gave way under this hammering process on front and flank, and fell back across a ravine to another strong position behind the Hamburg and Purdy road in rear of Shiloh. But they were not allowed to get away unmolested. The blood of their assailants was up, and they were pursued, driven, and slacavalry on his right flank, and thus they swept down the left bank of Lick Creek, driving in pickets, until they encountered Stuart's brigade on the Pittsburg and Hamburg road, supported by McArthur's brigade. Stuart was strongly posted on a steep hill near the river, covered with thick undergrowth, and with an open field in front
rd. The pressure on that wing, moreover, was relieved by the direction given to Nelson's column, which was moved toward Hamburg. General Beauregard says: About 2 P. M. the lines in advance, which had repulsed the enemy in their last fierce ae, under Beauregard's direction, Breckinridge had formed Statham's brigade at the junction of the roads to Monterey from Hamburg and from Pittsburg, about a mile and a half in the rear of Shiloh Church, and this brigade, with the Kentucky Brigade anh, which drenched the troops in bivouac; hence our forces did not reach the intersection of the roads from Pittsburg and Hamburg, in the immediate vicinity of the enemy, until late Saturday afternoon. It was then decided that the attack should bs corps and line of battle when menaced by the enemy, and the other two brigades were directed to advance by the road to Hamburg, to support Bragg's right; and, at the same time, Maney's regiment, of Polk's corps, was advanced by the same road to r
ers. This, I think, is Carl Schurz's first battle; an unfortunate beginning for him. May, 9 The arrest of Vallandingham, we learn from the newspapers, is creating a great deal of excitement in the North. I am pleased to see the authorities commencing at the root and not among the branches. I have just read Consul Anderson's appeal to the people of the United States in favor of an extensive representation of American live stock, machinery, and manufactures, at the coming fair in Hamburg. Friend James made a long letter of it; and, I doubt not, drank a gallon of good Dutch beer after each paragraph. May, 11 The Confederate papers say Streight's command was surrendered to four hundred and fifty rebels. I do not believe it. The Third Ohio would have whipped that many of the enemy on any field and under any circumstances. The expedition was a foolish one. Colonel Harker, who knows Streight well, predicted the fate which has overtaken him. He is brave, but deficient in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
which the Confederates had made repeated charges the day before, so covered with dead that it would have been possible to walk across the clearing, in any direction, stepping on dead bodies, without a foot touching the ground. On our side National and Confederate were mingled together in about equal proportions; but on the remainder of the field nearly all were Confederates. On one part, which had evidently not been plowed for several years, probably because the land was Ford where the Hamburg road crosses Lick Creek, looking from Colonel Stuart's position on the federal left. Lick Creek at this point was fordable on the first day of the battle, but the rains on Sunday night rendered it impassable on the second day. poor, bushes had grown up, some to the height of eight or ten feet. There was not one of these left standing unpierced by bullets. The smaller ones were all cut down. Contrary to all my experience up to that time, and to the experience of the Army I was then c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
quarters of a mile from the river at the east end of the Lick Creek hills; the Hamburg and Purdy road, which branches from the River road a mile and two-thirds in a ross the River road two-thirds of a mile apart, and also cross or run into the Hamburg and Purdy road nearly Map showing the Union camps at Shiloh. Obtained frod W. H. L. Wallace mortally wounded. At the fork of the River road and the Hamburg and Purdy road, is the camp of Sherman's Second Brigade, commanded by Colonel division. On both sides of the eastern Corinth road, half a mile south of the Hamburg and Purdy road, is Prentiss's division (the Sixth) of 2 brigades. It is not sf the Third Brigade is at the point where the western Corinth road crosses the Hamburg and Purdy road, 500 yards from the church, and the left is 200 yards from Hild running through the center of McClernand's camp, and nearly parallel with the Hamburg and Purdy road. This swinging back of the enemy's left, and the direction of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
sful charge on Prentiss's line. The whole Federal front, which had been broken here and there, and was getting ragged, gave way under this hammering process on front and flank, and fell back across a ravine to another strong position behind the Hamburg and Purdy road in rear of Shiloh. Sherman's route of retreat was marked by the thick-strewn corpses of his soldiers. At last, pressed back toward both Owl Creek and the River, Sherman and McClernand found safety by the interposition on their left and Sherman's shattered division on the right. General Johnston had pushed Chalmers to the right and front, sweeping down the left bank of Lick Creek, driving in pickets, until he encountered Stuart's Federal brigade on the Pittsburg and Hamburg road. Stuart was strongly posted on a steep hill near the River, covered with thick undergrowth, and with an open field in front. McArthur was to his right and rear in the woods. Jackson attacked McArthur, who fell back; and Chalmers went at
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
with his recent signal successes, would be left free at any moment to move up the Tennessee to Hamburg or, indeed, to Eastport, and thus, by seizing the Memphis and Charleston railroad, effectually ay establish himself at so unfavorable a base of operations as Pittsburg Landing rather than at Hamburg, which was really about to be made the Federal base of operations when the battle of Shiloh int one hundred thousand men. Unquestionably, it was upon this report that Pittsburg, rather than Hamburg, was made the Federal base; for Hurlbut's and Sherman's divisions were immediately ordered ashotay the retrograde, and the Federal right was forced back to the line of the road from Purdy to Hamburg. There a foothold was gained on a thickly wooded ridge, with a ravine in front, from which twoediate rear of a line which Hurlbut formed along the edge of a field on favorable ground on the Hamburg road, southward of the position last taken up by McClernand. Meanwhile (9:30 A. M.) I had adva
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
ch 14th, to assume command of the Army of the Tennessee, were as follows: General Sherman occupied the extreme front at Shiloh church; Generals Prentiss and Hurlbut lay on the left-; Generals McClernand and W. H. L. Wallace on the right and rear. The form of4he encampment was a semi-circle with its greater arc on the left. Two roads led from the landing to Corinth, distant twenty miles--one by the way of the church, and the other through General Prentiss' camp, intersecting the road from Hamburg, seven miles further up the river. These troops, particularly the advance division under Sherman, were mostly fresh from the recruiting camps, and wholly unpracticed, even in the simplest company maneuvres. Many of the regiments were not supplied with arms until their departure up the Tennessee. This was the case with my own regiment. With such disadvantages we went into the great battle of Sunday. At gray dawn, on the morning of the 6th, Lieutenant Burriss, of Captain Sisson's comp
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