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he recent glorious victory of our arms in Tennessee. Resolved, That the death of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, the commander of our forces, while leading his troops to victory, cannot but temper our exultation with a shade of sadness at the loss of so able, skilful, and gallant an officer. Resolved, That, in respect to the memory of Gen. Johnston--the Senate concurring — Congress do now adjourn until twelve o'clock to-morrow.--Richmond Whig, April 8. A skirmish took place at Lawrenceburgh, Tenn., between two companies of Federal and rebel cavalry, the latter being put to flight with a loss of four men wounded. Four horses were captured, and carried into the Union lines late in the evening. One of the horses belonged to a Lieut. Polk, of Columbia, Tenn., the left side of the saddle being covered with blood.--Brig.-Gen. Lucius J. Polk, C. S. A., gave himself up to Gen. Negley, in command at Columbia, Tenn. He was released on parole. At Edenburg, Va., to-day, the rebels o
November 3. Colonel Fitzgibbon, of the Thirteenth Michigan infantry, overtook the combined forces of Cooper, Kirk, Williams, and Scott, numbering four hundred men, this morning, at Lawrenceburgh, thirty-five miles south of Columbia, Tenn. After a severe hand-to-hand fight, he defeated them with a loss on his part of three men wounded, and eight horses killed. The rebel loss was eight killed, seven wounded, and twenty-four prisoners, among them one captain and two lieutenants. General Bragg's forage-train, sent up Lookout Valley, in front of his position, was captured. The train was sent to camp. The train-guard was also captured.--Official Report. General Saxton issued a circular to the freedmen of South-Carolina, authorizing them to locate in the lands in that department which were about to be sold by the Tax Commissioners, not exceeding twenty acres for each head of a family. The description of the land, when located, to be accompanied by the deposit of the Governm
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
ceeding day Lee's corps marched to the front about ten miles on the Chisholm road, between the Lawrenceburg and Waynesboro' roads. On the 20th of November, Stewart's corps having crossed the Tennessee and bivouacked several miles beyond on the Lawrenceburg road, orders were issued that the entire army move at an early hour the next morning. Lee's and Stewart's corps marched upon the Chisholm and the Lawrenceburg roads, and Cheatham's upon the Waynesboro' road. Early dawn of the 21st found the Lawrenceburg roads, and Cheatham's upon the Waynesboro' road. Early dawn of the 21st found the army in motion. I hoped by a rapid march to get in rear of Schofield's forces, then at Pulaski, before they were able to reach Duck River. That night headquarters were established at Rawhide, twelve miles north of Florence, on the Waynesboro' road. The march was resumed on the 22d and continued till the 27th, upon which date the troops, having taken advantage of every available road, reached Columbia, via Mount Pleasant. Forrest operated in our front against the enemy's cavalry, which he ea
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
way to join Sherman. The Confederate army in three corps (S. D. Lee's, A. P. Stewart's, and B. F. Cheatham's) began its northward march from Florence on the 19th of November, in weather of great severity. It rained and snowed and hailed and froze, and the roads were almost impassable. Forrest had come up, with about six thousand cavalry, and led the advance with indomitable energy. Hatch and Croxton made such resistance as they could; but on the 22d the head of Hood's column was at Lawrenceburg, some 16 miles due west of Pulaski, Tennessee and on a road running direct to Columbia, where the railroad and turnpike Major-General George H. Thomas. From a photograph. to Nashville cross Duck River, and where there were less than 800 men to guard the bridges. The situation at Pulaski, with an enemy nearly three times as large fairly on the flank, was anything but cheering. Warned by the reports from General Hatch, and by the orders of General Thomas, who, on the 20th, had direct
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
ng out from Columbia, saw his peril, and met it as usual. Paroling the thousand prisoners he had captured, he destroyed five miles of the railroad southward from the Duck River, and then pushing across the country by way of Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, he escaped over the Tennessee Oct. 6, 1864. at Bainbridge, with very little loss. Thomas's Headquarters, this is a view of the fine mansion of Mr. Cunningham, 15 high Street, Nashville, occupied by Generals Buell and Thomas, and other and turned his face toward the sea, Hood threw the remainder of his army over the Tennessee Nov. 17, 1864. on a pontoon bridge at Florence, and two days afterward, moved on parallel roads in the direction of Nashville, through Waynesboroa and Lawrenceburg, driving General Hatch from the latter place. Nov. 22. Thomas had hoped to meet Hood in battle south of Duck River, but the two divisions under General A. J. Smith, coming from Missouri, See page 280. had not arrived, and he did not fe
. My purpose was to call again your attention as I did yesterday: 1st. To the necessity of guarding well your left flank, and rear, in advancing towards Lawrenceburg and Pulaski, against a sudden offensive movement of the enemy from Huntsville or Athens, across the Elk river. 2d. To securing against the passage of the ed their homes. G. T. Beauregard, General. On the 20th of November, Stewart's Corps having crossed the Tennessee and bivouacked several miles beyond on the Lawrenceburg road, orders were issued that the entire Army move at an early hour the next morning. Lee's and Stewart's Corps marched upon the Chisholm and the LawrenceburgLawrenceburg roads, and Cheatham's Corps upon the Waynesboroa road. Early dawn of the 21st found the Army in motion. I hoped by a rapid march to get in rear of Schofield's forces, then at Pulaski, before they were able to reach Duck river. That night headquarters were established at Rawhide, twelve miles north of Florence, on the Waynes
nce and upon their right flank. The enemy's forces at this time were concentrated at Pulaski, with some force also at Lawrenceburg. I hoped to be able to place the Army between these forces of the enemy and Nashville, but he evacuated Pulaski upon the 23d, hearing of our advance (our cavalry having furiously driven off their forces at Lawrenceburg), and moved rapidly by the turnpike and railroad to Columbia. The want of a good map of the country, and the deep mud through which the Army marc, and upon their right flank. The enemy's forces at this time were concentrated at Pulaski, with some force also at Lawrenceburg. I hoped to be able to place our Army between these forces of the enemy and Nashville, but he evacuated Pulaski upon the 23d, hearing of our advance (our cavalry having previously driven off their forces at Lawrenceburg), and moved rapidly by the turnpike and railroad to Columbia. The want of a good map of the country, and the deep mud through which the Army mar
April 4, 1862.-skirmish at Lawrenceburg, Tenn. Report of Brig. Gen. Milo S. Hascall, U. S. Army. Hdqrs. Fifteenth Brigade, Army of der Lieutenant-Colonel Murray, of that regiment, and marched for Lawrenceburg. The general had been informed that about 500 of the enemy's caroops had passed. My instructions were to proceed cautiously to Lawrenceburg, a distance of about 14 miles from our camp, and capture the ene every house we passed, to prevent any one taking information to Lawrenceburg of our approach, but when getting about 2 miles from there we hag and returning, my command being everywhere received (except at Lawrenceburg) with every demonstration of joy and treated with the utmost kinremainder of the cavalry, with myself and staff, bivouacked near Lawrenceburg the night of the 4th, and having procured wagons in the neighbortant. This latter part concerning the march after the affair at Lawrenceburg, though not strictly speaking part of this report, I have nevert
Oct. 3. over the Tennessee at Brown's ferry. Forrest had now enemies enough encircling him to have eaten all his horses; but, destroying five miles of the railroad, and paroling his prisoners, he sped south-west through Mount Pleasant and Lawrenceburg, and got safely across the Tennessee at Bainbridge; having inflicted much injury, kept busy many times his number of men, worn out a good many of our shoes, taken at least 1,000 prisoners, and escaped with very little loss. Hood, who had meeached Hood, still at Florence, Ala., where he had a pontoon bridge, with part of his force on either side of the river, than the crossing of his remaining corps commenced; Nov. 17. while his van, already over, moved through Waynesboroa and Lawrenceburg on Nashville. Thomas says: Had the enemy delayed his advance a week or ten days longer, I would have been ready to meet him at some point south of Duck river. Hood's army was organized in three corps, under Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lt.
errilla chiefs and pursued them to Centreville, Dickman County, where Hawkins made another stand, attacking our forces while crossing the river. Hawkins was again routed and pursued until his forces dispersed. Rebel loss from fifteen to twenty killed and sixty prisoners; our loss, one severely and several slightly wounded. Again, on November fourth, that Major Fitzgibbon, Fourteenth Michigan infantry, came upon the combined forces of Cooper, Kirk, Williams, and Scott, (guerrillas,) at Lawrenceburgh, thirty-five miles from Columbia, and after a severe hand-to-hand fight, defeated them, killing eight, wounding seven, and capturing twenty-four prisoners; among the latter are one captain and two lieutenants. Our loss, three men slightly wounded and eight horses killed. He reports the enemy four hundred strong, and his force one hundred and twenty. November thirteenth, Captain Cutter, with one company of mounted infantry and a portion of Whittemore's battery, (mounted,) belonging to
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