Browsing named entities in John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. You can also browse the collection for Lawrenceburg (Tennessee, United States) or search for Lawrenceburg (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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. My purpose was to call again your attention as I did yesterday: 1st. To the necessity of guarding well your left flank, and rear, in advancing towards Lawrenceburg and Pulaski, against a sudden offensive movement of the enemy from Huntsville or Athens, across the Elk river. 2d. To securing against the passage of the ed their homes. G. T. Beauregard, General. On the 20th of November, Stewart's Corps having crossed the Tennessee and bivouacked several miles beyond on the Lawrenceburg road, orders were issued that the entire Army move at an early hour the next morning. Lee's and Stewart's Corps marched upon the Chisholm and the LawrenceburgLawrenceburg roads, and Cheatham's Corps upon the Waynesboroa road. Early dawn of the 21st found the Army in motion. I hoped by a rapid march to get in rear of Schofield's forces, then at Pulaski, before they were able to reach Duck river. That night headquarters were established at Rawhide, twelve miles north of Florence, on the Waynes
nce and upon their right flank. The enemy's forces at this time were concentrated at Pulaski, with some force also at Lawrenceburg. I hoped to be able to place the Army between these forces of the enemy and Nashville, but he evacuated Pulaski upon the 23d, hearing of our advance (our cavalry having furiously driven off their forces at Lawrenceburg), and moved rapidly by the turnpike and railroad to Columbia. The want of a good map of the country, and the deep mud through which the Army marc, and upon their right flank. The enemy's forces at this time were concentrated at Pulaski, with some force also at Lawrenceburg. I hoped to be able to place our Army between these forces of the enemy and Nashville, but he evacuated Pulaski upon the 23d, hearing of our advance (our cavalry having previously driven off their forces at Lawrenceburg), and moved rapidly by the turnpike and railroad to Columbia. The want of a good map of the country, and the deep mud through which the Army mar