Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lewisburg (Tennessee, United States) or search for Lewisburg (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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February 25. General Henry Heth and staff have arrived at Lewisburgh, Va. He takes command of the forces of Kanawha. He was greeted with great applause by the troops, many of whom were in his old command, and all knew him by reputation. Great confidence is felt in this young and talented officer, and no one could have been sent who gives so universal satisfaction.--Richmond Dispatch, February 28. The Savannah Republican of this date says: A reconnoissance by the steamer Savannah, yesterday, brought to light all the movements of the enemy in our river. They have erected three batteries, which effectually cut off all communication with the Fort--one of four guns, on Venus's Point, one of the same number of guns on a small marsh, just above Long Island, and commanding the south channel, and the third on boats moored in Mud River. The three are located in the form of a triangle, and could not be passed by any vessel in our service. The guns are all of a heavy calibre, most
rs, was obliged to retreat to Fort Craig with the loss of three wounded.--Denver Herald. Portions of the army of the Potomac crossed the Chickahominy River in two places, at the Railroad Bridge and at Bottom's Bridge. The battle of Lewisburgh, Va., was fought this day. The rebel Colonel Heath attacked Col. Crook with three thousand infantry and cavalry, and six cannon. After a spirited fight of an hour, the rebels were put to flight in utter confusion, and their flight soon became a ond which they could not be pursued. Crook's victory was won only by hard fighting against greatly superior forces. The Nationals lost fourteen killed, sixty wounded, and five pickets captured. Some of the wounded were shot in the streets of Lewisburgh, as they were returning to the hospital, by the citizens of the town.--(Doc. 44.) The town of Grand Gulf, Miss., was shelled by the Union gunboats Richmond and Hartford. Considerable damage was done to the town, but no person was injured.
e made by the troops of General Howard, up a steep and difficult hill, over two hundred feet high, completely routing the enemy, and driving him from his barricades on its top, and the repulse by General Geary's command of greatly superior numbers, who attempted to surprise him, will rank among the most distinguished feats of arms of this war. --A sharp fight occurred at Stevensburgh, Virginia, between General Kilpatrick's cavalry and a party of rebels, who were defeated. The battles of Rappahannock Station and Kelly's Ford, Virginia, were fought this day, resulting in the retreat of the rebels across the Rappahannock River.--(Doc. 10.) General Duffie, in command of the National forces, occupied Lewisburgh, Virginia, this morning; the rebels had passed through in their retreat from General Averill, just previous to his arrival. General Duffie captured the rebel camp, tents, provisions, and one cannon, many prisoners and one hundred head of cattle.--General Kelley's Despatch.
December 12. General Scammon attacked General Echols at Lewisburgh, Va., routing him effectually, killing and wounding quite a number of the rebels, and capturing many prisoners. General Kelley's Despatch.
te at Richmond, Va., a resolution was passed approving the action of the government with regard to the outlawry of General Butler, and the determination of the rebel authorities to hold no communication with him.--A party of rebel guerrillas made their appearance on the bank of the river opposite Memphis, Tenn., but were driven off by a gunboat, without effecting any damage.--Lieutenant-Colonel Fuller, of the Third Arkansas cavalry, received the following from the major of his regiment, at Lewisburgh: Captain Hamilton has had a fight with a portion of Wells's command, and killed six, and wounded as many more. Hamilton lost six, and but one or two killed; the balance missing. The command opposing him were under Captain Thompson, numbering nearly one hundred. Hamilton killed Thompson, and brought his horse, equipments, revolvers, and papers in with him. The rebels were dressed in Federal uniforms. Hamilton is here with me. --Newmarket, Tenn., was occupied by the rebels belongin