Your search returned 76 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
h the utmost celerity, directing his march over the road on the top of the mountain. He had, with great prudence, already moved his trains back to the rear of Little River on the mountain, but unfortunately, being ignorant of the mountain road, moved down the mountain at Winston's Gap, down Lookout Val. ley to Cooper's Gap, up th Springs, and crossed Lookout Mountain, encamping at the base, near Henderson's. Sheridan's division marched at five A. M. from Stearn's Mills, and encamped at Little River, about two miles and a half from the western crest. Headquarters of the corps were moved to near Alpine, Ga. On arriving at Alpine, I discovered that the et of the thirteenth, and on the night of the fourteenth it was again encamped in Lookout Valley, except the division guarding the trains, which was encamped at Little River, on the mountains. Sheridan's division marched down Lookout Valley to Johnson's Creek, and encamped at the base of the mountain. Being informed that a good
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
s view he had bidden Burnside to hold on to Knoxville with a firm grasp, as long as possible, until he should receive succor in some form. Longstreet, meanwhile, was pressing rapidly forward. By a forced march he struck the Tennessee River at Hough's Ferry, a few miles below Loudon, crossed it on a pontoon bridge there, and pressed on toward the right flank of Burnside, at Lenoir Station. At the same time Wheeler and Forrest were dispatched, with cavalry, by way of Marysville, across Little River, to seize the heights on the south side of the Holston, which commanded Knoxville, the grand objective of Longstreet — the key to East Tennessee. Perceiving the danger threatened by this flank movement, and in obedience to his instructions, Burnside sent out a force on the Loudon road, under General Ferrero, to watch and check the foe, and secure the National trains, and, at the same time, ordered the whole force to fall back as rapidly as possible to Knoxville. A portion of the Ninth C
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
s of columns communicated at Marysville, where I met Major Van Buren (of General Burnside's staff), who announced that Longstreet had the night before retreated on the Rutledge, Rogersville, and Bristol road, leading to Virginia; that General Burnside's cavalry was on his heels; and that the general desired to see me in person as soon as I could come to Knoxville. I ordered all the troops to halt and rest, except the two divisions of General Granger, which were ordered to move forward to Little River, and General Granger to report in person to General Burnside for orders. His was the force originally designed to reenforce. General Burnside, and it was eminently proper that it should join in the stern-chase after Longstreet. On the morning of December 6th I rode from Marysville into Knoxville, and met General Burnside. General Granger arrived later in the day. We examined his lines of fortifications, which were a wonderful production for the short time allowed in their selection o
he heads of columns communicated at Marysville, where I met Major Van Buren, of General Burnside's staff, announcing that Longstreet had the night before retreated on the Rutledge, Rodgersville, and Bristol road, leading to Virginia; that General Burnside's cavalry was on his heels; that the General desired to see me in person as soon as I could come to Knoxville. I ordered all the troops to halt and rest, except the two divisions of General Granger, which were ordered to move forward to Little River, and General Granger to report in person to General Burnside for orders. His force was originally designed to reenforce General Burnside, and it was eminently proper that it should join in the stern chase after Longstreet. On the morning of December sixth, I rode from Marysville into Knoxville and met General Burnside. General Granger arrived later in the day. We examined his lines of fortifications, which were a wonderful production for the short time allowed in the selection of was
moved out, crossed the river on the pontoon — the same bridge we had at Loudon — marched to Rockford, a small town on Little River, and camped for the night. November second, crossed Little River and marched to Maryville; went into camp and remaiLittle River and marched to Maryville; went into camp and remained there till the morning of the seventh, during which time we scoured the country as far down as Little Tennessee River, where Lieutenant McAdams, of the First Kentucky cavalry, gained a glorious victory by drowning, killing, capturing, and completely routing twice his own number. On the morning of the seventh, General Sanders's cavalry corps fell back across Little River to Rockford, where we remained till the morning of the fourteenth. November fourteenth, early in the morning, the rebelfrom Frenche's bridge, across Stock Creek, on the Martin Gap road, along the creek to its mouth, where it empties into Little River; a distance of about five miles. November fifteenth, early in the day, the enemy made his appearance along our line
he army moved on the old Alabama road, and took up a position on Little River, throwing a strong advance-guard across the river, toward Blue Py-eighth. In the mean time, however, a bridge was thrown across Little River, and Woods's and Hazen's divisions of the Fifteenth corps, with passing Taylor's Ridge, in the different valleys, down as far as Little River. Vann's Valley is very fertile, and was filled with corn, sweet edgeville, via Eatonton, Geary's division rejoining the corps at Little River. The corps reached Milledgeville on the twenty-second of Novembivision rejoined the column on the twenty-first, before reaching Little River. The other two divisions, with the trains of the corps, moved On the twenty-first, marched through Eatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or three miles of the Eatonton Branch Railroad were destroych. On the twenty-second, having laid the pontoon-bridge over Little River, the corps crossed and moved forward to the suburbs of Milledgev
royed. A wagon-bridge over that river and several mills and factories were also burned. The division rejoined the column on the twenty-first, before reaching Little River. The other two divisions, with the trains of the corps, moved through Madison, and encamped four miles beyond. About six miles of railroad were destroyed btieth, moved forward and encamped near Eatonton. The afternoon was rainy and the roads heavy. On the twenty-first, marched through Eatonton, encamping near Little River. Two or three miles of the Eatonton Branch Railroad were destroyed on the march. On the twenty-second, having laid the pontoon-bridge over Little River, theLittle River, the corps crossed and moved forward to the suburbs of Milledgeville. Two regiments under Colonel Hawley, Third Wisconsin volunteers, (appointed commandant of the post,) were sent to occupy the town. The First and Second divisions were encamped on the east side of the Oconee, and the Third division on the west side, near the bridge.
r Creek, marching ten miles. November seventeenth, moved at seven A. M. through Lithonia to Couzens, seventeen miles, and destroying five miles of railroad. November eighteenth, marched at daylight, crossing Yellow River by Covington, to Ulcafouhatchie River, fifteen miles, destroying three miles railroad. November nineteenth, marched at daylight, passing through Newburn, to Shadydale, nineteen miles. November twentieth, left camp at seven A. M., marching to Etonton Factory or Little River, (15) fifteen miles. November twenty-first, marched at daylight, crossing Mud Creek, and camping at Cedar Creek, marching eighteen miles. November twenty-second, in camp. November twenty-third, moved at daylight, and camped near Milledgeville, fifteen miles. November twenty-fourth, left camp at ten A. M., passing through Milledgeville and crossing the Oconee River, and camping at Town Creek, nine miles. November twenty-fifth, moved at daylight, crossing Buffalo Creek, and camp
d Station, the other to Waller's Ferry, at the mouth of Little River. A very heavy cold rain fell all day, and marching wasned that it would be impossible for my command to cross Little River below the crossing of the railroad, there being no bridvisions just passing. Moved on in rear of the train to Little River, where I received orders to advance immediately to Mill marched (November twenty-second) along the railroad to Little River, and from there to Milledgeville, through which we passten miles of Milledgeville; camped in pine woods on the Little River. November 22.--First and Second divisions, with trai from the latter place. Encamped at three P. M. on the Little River, ten miles from Milledgeville. November twenty-seconin camp until nearly night, when we moved out, crossing Little River (a branch of the Oconee) on pontoons; guarding train. on. Marched thence south-east through Eatonton, across Little River to Milledgeville, where we halted one day. Crossed the
n accordance with orders received, I moved my train out on the Decatur road, reporting to Brigadier-General Williams, commanding Twentieth army corps. I remained with this corps during the campaign. I had no bridging to do until we reached Little River, twelve miles north of Milledgeville. 20th. We put a pontoon-bridge across Little River, of ten boats, making two hundred and twenty feet of bridge, during the night of the twentieth November. 24th. We put a pontoon-bridge across the Little River, of ten boats, making two hundred and twenty feet of bridge, during the night of the twentieth November. 24th. We put a pontoon-bridge across the channel of Buffalo Creek. This bridge took three boats, and was eighty feet in length. I also repaired five bridges at this point, by repairing the trestles that had been burned off, and using balk and chess for covering. These bridges were three hundred and sixty feet in length. I also repaired two bridges at the same flat or swamp, one hundred and twenty feet in length, using timber procured from the woods, making the whole length of bridging at this point five hundred and sixty feet. 2
1 2