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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 49 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Manchester, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Manchester, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1861., [Electronic resource], English Opinions on the Fort Sumter affair. (search)
The Mayor will have before him this morning two negroes, lately arrested here who were expelled from Manchester, named Richard and Jordan Smith. The people of Manchester, who ought certainly to know, regard them as dangerous fellows to the peace of a slaveholding community. In the possession of Richard Smith was found a number of letters from abolition localities, plainly showing his sympathy with that vile class of persons. These were seized by the Manchester authorities and detained.Manchester, who ought certainly to know, regard them as dangerous fellows to the peace of a slaveholding community. In the possession of Richard Smith was found a number of letters from abolition localities, plainly showing his sympathy with that vile class of persons. These were seized by the Manchester authorities and detained. As a sight of them would throw some insight on a case now pending against them before the Mayor, he requested a look, which one of the Manchester authorities promised to gratify this morning, by the production of the documents. May-be the revelations therein contained will serve to get the Smiths into the service of the State. Things tend in that direction.
Manchester. --Yesterday morning we were prompted to pay a visit to our neighboring town, Manchester, and, if for no other purpose, the contrast between the busy hum of our own streets and the soothing quiet pervading all sections of this enviabManchester, and, if for no other purpose, the contrast between the busy hum of our own streets and the soothing quiet pervading all sections of this enviable little place, would sufficiently compensate for the trouble and fatigue of the journey on the hottest day in summer. While we found all manifesting the utmost composure generally, we were not long in ascertaining that an enthusiastic and determinbly and speedily crown our efforts in the great struggle in which we are now engaged. In a military point of view, Manchester has no superior. Out of a voting population of a little over four hundred, more than two hundred have connected themseand attention at the present time. On Sunday evening last, a little boy named Orvis Avery, whose mother resides in Manchester, fell into the river while fishing, and out for the timely appearance of a gentleman passing, would have drowned. In t