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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 5: the week of flying fights. (search)
n to push things, --some of these things being ourselves. But the manifest results on others helped our spirits to sustain the wear and tear of body. The constantly diminishing ratio of the strength of Lee's army compared with ours made it clear that we should soon overcome that resistance and relieve Virginia of the burden of being the head of the Confederacy, and from that must follow the downfall of the Confederacy itself. In this race, the 8th of April found the Fifth Corps at Prospect Station on the Southside Railroad, nearly abreast of Lee's hurrying column, ten miles north of us at New Store, across the Appomattox,--Meade with his two corps close upon his rear. We had been now a week in hot pursuit, fighting and marching by sharp turns, on a long road. At noon of this day we halted to give opportunity for General Ord of the Army of the James to have the advance of us upon the road. He had come across from his successful assault on the center of the enemy's entrenchment
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
o the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia; but as far as your proposal may affect the Confederate States forces under my command and tend to the restoration of peace, I should be pleased to meet you at ten A. M. to-morrow on the old stage road to Richmond, between the picket lines of the two armies. R. E. Lee, General. The enemy's movements of the day were impressive of his desire to get by our left flank and make a strong stand across the route of our head of column. At Prospect Station, General Sheridan was informed of four trains of cars at Appomattox Station loaded with provisions for General Lee's army. He gave notice to Merritt's and Crook's cavalry, and rode twenty-eight miles in time for Custer's division to pass the station, cut off the trains, and drive back the guard advancing to protect them. He helped himself to the provisions, and captured besides twenty-five pieces of artillery and a wagon and hospital train. At night General Lee made his Headquarte
the infantry could overtake him, I directed everything on Appomattox depot, recalling Crook the night of the 7th to Prospect Station, while Merritt camped at Buffalo Creek, and Mackenzie made a reconnoissance along the Lynchburg railroad. At break of day, April 8, Merritt and Mackenzie united with Crook at Prospect Station, and the cavalry all moved then toward Appomattox depot. Hardly had it started when one of the scouts-Sergeant Whiteinformed me that there were four trains of cars at th and had no difficulty in accomplishing his mission. About five or six miles from Appomattox, on the road toward Prospect Station near its intersection with the Walker's Church road, my adjutant-general, Colonel Newhall, met General Grant, he hav-General U. S. Grant, Commanding Armies of the U. S. General: I marched early this morning from Buffalo Creek and Prospect Station on Appomattox Station, where my scouts had reported trains of cars with supplies for Lee's army. A short time befor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penobscot. (search)
operty. The French fortified the place, and were so strongly intrenched that the expedition was abandoned. The Plymouth people never afterwards recovered their interest at Penobscot. The first permanent English occupation of the region of the Penobscot—to which the French laid claim—was acquired in 1759, when Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, with the consent of the legislature, caused a fort to be built on the western bank of the Penobscot (afterwards Fort Knox), near the village of Prospect, which was named Fort Pownall. An armed force from Massachusetts took possession of the region, built the fort, cut off the communications of the Eastern Indians (the only ones then hostile to the English), and so ended the contest for the Penobscot region by arms. In 1799 a British force of several hundred men from Nova Scotia entered eastern Maine and established themselves in a fortified place on the Penobscot River. Massachusetts sent a force to dislodge the intruders. The expediti
Boneyard and duty there till November. Little Bear Creek November 28 and December 12. Duty at Corinth till March, 1863. Expedition against Forest December 18, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Moved to Bethel, Tenn., March 1863, and duty there till June 1. Moved to Corinth June 1; thence to Moscow and duty there till August. At LaGrange till October. March to Pulaski October 30-November 11 and duty there till March, 1864. Veterans on furlough January and February. At Prospect, Tenn., till April. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstration on Resaca May 8-13. Sugar Valley May 9. Battle of Resaca May 13-14. Ley's Ferry, Oostenaula River, May 15. Rome Cross Roads May 16. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Mill July 3-4. Chattahoochie R
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
on September 16. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-12. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November 2, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Duty at Corinth till April, 1863. Dodge's Expedition to Northern Alabama April 15-May 2. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., May 13, and duty there till October 18. At Iuka, Miss., till November. Moved to Prospect, Tenn., and duty there till March, 1864. At Decatur, Ala., till May. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Sugar Valley, near Resaca, May 9. Near Resaca May 13. Battle of Resaca May 14-16. Advance on Dallas May 18-25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
th till October. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Hatchie River October 5-12. Duty at Corinth till April, 1863. Dodge's Expedition to Northern Alabama April 15-May 8. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Expedition to Tupelo, Miss., May 2-8. King's Creek, near Tupelo, May 5. At Corinth, Moscow and Lagrange till October. March to Pulaski, Tenn., October 30-November 11, and duty there till March, 1864. At Prospect, Tenn., till April. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Sugar Valley May 9. Battle of Resaca May 13-14. Ley's Ferry, Oostenaula River May 15. Rome Cross Roads May 16. Battles about Dallas May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Ruff's Mill July 3-4. Chattahoochie River July 5-7. Battle of Atlanta July 22. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 2
Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., till October, and at Prospect, Tenn., till February, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Sugar Va Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., till October, and at Prospect, Tenn., till February, 1864. Re-enlisted at Prospect December 26, 1863. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8, Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., till October, and at Prospect, Tenn., till February, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September, 1864. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. S April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., till October 18. Movement to Prospect, Tenn., October 18-November 30, and duty there till January, 1864. Veterans absent on furlough January 2 to February 28,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Duty at Corinth till September. Battle of Iuka September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Hatchie River October 5-12. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central Railroad November 2, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Duty at Corinth, Miss., till May, 1863, and at Memphis, Tenn., till October. Movement to Prospect, Tenn., October 18-November 13. Duty there and at Decatur, Ala., till April, 1864. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1 to September 8. Demonstrations on Resaca May 8-13. Battle of Resaca May 13, 14 and 15. Battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 9-July 2. Assault on Kenesaw June 27. Nickajack Creek July 2-5. Ruff's Mills July 3-4. Chattahoochie River July 5-17. Battle of Atlan
order, for it appears that Gen. Humphreys had ordered a halt at sunset, which continued two hours. See his Report of Operations, p. 12. The march was then resumed in the hope of coming up with the main body of the enemy, whose cavalry pickets had already been met with; but there seeming no probability of doing so, and the men being much exhausted from want of food and fatigue, a halt was ordered at midnight. The fighting we had heard was due to a dash made by the gallant Custer upon Prospect Station, where he seized four trains of supplies there awaiting Lee's army, and sent them puffing back towards Farmville for safe-keeping. With Gen. Sheridan in Lee's Last Campaign. As the artillery was marching in the rear of the corps, it was the last to pitch camp, which we did not do this night until into the small hours. It was now definitely affirmed that Grant had given Lee the choice of surrendering or receiving the shock of the whole Union army. The actual correspondence in relati
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